Toyota K platform

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The Toyota K platform, informally known as the Toyota Camry platform, is a front-wheel drive automobile platform (also adaptable to four-wheel drive) that has underpinned various Toyota and Lexus models from the mid-size category upwards[1] since November 2000, starting with the Highlander (XU20).[2][3][4][5] This platform sits above the front-wheel-drive MC and New MC platforms, but below the N and New N platforms designed for rear-wheel drive applications.[1] Starting with the XV70 Toyota Camry (2017), the K platform is part of the Toyota New Global Architecture.[citation needed]

Features[edit]

  • It is a front-wheel drive platform, with optional four-wheel drive.
  • Four-wheel drive variants use either:
    • V-Flex II system, which is a viscous-coupling torque-on-demand unit (on most models); or
    • Symmetric full-time four-wheel drive (on Lexus RX and Highlander)
    • e-FOUR system (rear wheels are driven by electric motors) on hybrid models.
  • Engines are mounted transversely.
  • MacPherson struts are used in suspension at all four corners with the exception of the Sienna, which uses a twist-beam rear suspension.

Applications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Akita, Masahiro; Shiohara, Kunihiko (11 June 2012). "Observations on TNGA: How will Toyota's plans to make better cars affect suppliers". Credit Suisse. pp. 2, 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on 17 June 2014.
  2. ^ "Affiliates (Toyota wholly-owned subsidiaries)-Toyota Motor Kyushu, Inc". Toyota Motor Corporation. 2012. Retrieved 18 July 2014.
  3. ^ a b Whitfield, Kermit (1 September 2001). "Toyota Pursues the Elusive 'Triple WOW'". Automotive Design & Production. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Kim, Liz (28 August 2001). "2002 Toyota Camry First Drive". Edmunds.com. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Sherefkin, Robert (20 August 2001). "He put Camry on track". Automotive News. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
  6. ^ a b c Hayashi, Tatsuhiko (27 January 2009). "New Lexus SUVs Come with Smooth Luggage Compartment". Nikkei Technology Online. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
  7. ^ Phelan, Mark (24 June 2012). "Mark Phelan: Toyota's North American staff pitches in with Avalon redesign for 2013". Detroit Free Press. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
  8. ^ Eisenstein, Paul A. (24 August 2011). "First Drive: 2012 Toyota Camry". The Detroit Bureau. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
  9. ^ Booth, David (10 August 2011). "Car Review: 2004 Toyota Camry Solara Coupe". Canwest News Service. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
  10. ^ a b Riches, Erin (31 October 2008). "2009 Toyota Venza First Drive". Edmunds.com. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
  11. ^ Mathioudakis, Bryon (28 March 2013). "Super Kluger!". Wheels. Archived from the original on 25 November 2014.
  12. ^ Dubow, Charles (10 March 2005). "2005 Toyota Sienna XLE Limited AWD". Forbes. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
  13. ^ Filipponio, Frank (18 December 2009). "First Drive: 2011 Toyota Sienna tries to make the minivan cool". Autoblog.com. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
  14. ^ Vasilash, Gary S. (1 December 2008). "Venza Revealed". Automotive Design & Production. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
  15. ^ Wood, Colum (3 March 2015). "Toyota Venza Axed". AutoGuide.com. Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  16. ^ Wilson, Greg (19 May 2006). "First Drive: 2007 Lexus ES 350". Autos.ca. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
  17. ^ Harley, Michael (24 January 2014). "2013 Lexus ES350". Autoblog.com. Retrieved 17 June 2014.