Toyota New Global Architecture

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Toyota New Global Architecture
2016 Toyota Prius (ZVW50R) Hybrid liftback (2016-04-02) 01.jpg
Fourth-generation Toyota Prius, the first vehicle to use the Toyota New Global Architecture platform
Overview
ManufacturerToyota
Production2015–present
Body and chassis
Platform
  • TNGA-B
  • TNGA-C
  • TNGA-F
  • TNGA-K
  • TNGA-L
  • e-TNGA
Chronology
Predecessor

The Toyota New Global Architecture (abbreviated as TNGA) are modular automobile platforms that underpin various Toyota and Lexus models starting with the fourth-generation Prius in late 2015.[1] TNGA platforms accommodate different vehicle sizes and also front-, rear- and all-wheel drive configurations.[2]

The platforms were developed as part of a company-wide effort to simplify the vehicles being produced by Toyota. Before the introduction of the TNGA, Toyota was building roughly 100 different platform variants.[3] As of 2020, the five TNGA platforms underpin more than 50% of Toyota vehicles sold worldwide and is expected to underpin about 80% by 2023.[4]

Each platform is based on a standardized seat height that allows for sharing of key interior components such as steering systems, shifters, pedals, seat frames and airbags.[5] These components are often less visible, allowing for cars that share platforms to have unique interiors. Compared to Toyota's older platforms, TNGA costs 20 percent less to produce while offering increased chassis stiffness, lower centers of gravity for better handling and lower hood cowls for better forward visibility.[3]

The TNGA platform was developed alongside the Dynamic Force engine, which similarly is replacing more than 800 engine variants with a much simpler lineup of 17 versions of nine engines.[3] Toyota is also simplifying its lineup of transmissions, hybrid systems, and all-wheel drive systems.

Applications[edit]

TNGA-B (GA-B)[edit]

The TNGA-B platform underpins unibody vehicles in the B-segment or subcompact car, and subcompact crossover SUV categories. The platform is offered in both front-wheel drive and all-wheel drive variants and is paired with a transverse engine.[6][7] The platform also supports a wheelbase length of 2,550–2,560 mm (100.4–100.8 in). TNGA-B replaces the older B platform.

Vehicles using platform (calendar years):

TNGA-C (GA-C)[edit]

The TNGA-C platform underpins unibody vehicles in the C-segment or compact car, and subcompact/compact crossover SUV categories. The platform is offered in both front-wheel drive and all-wheel drive variants and is paired with a transverse engine. The platform also supports a wheelbase length of 2,640–2,750 mm (103.9–108.3 in). TNGA-C replaces the older MC/New MC platform.

Vehicles using platform (calendar years):

TNGA-F (GA-F)[edit]

The TNGA-F platform underpins body-on-frame vehicles in the full-size SUV and full-size pickup truck category. The platform is expected also underpin future mid-sized pickup trucks as well as mid-sized SUVs.[18]

Vehicles using platform (calendar years):

TNGA-K (GA-K)[edit]

The TNGA-K platform underpins unibody vehicles in the D-segment/E-segment or mid-size/full-size car, and compact/mid-size crossover SUV categories. The platform is offered in both front-wheel drive and all-wheel drive variants and is paired with a transverse engine. The platform also supports a wheelbase length of 2,690–3,060 mm (105.9–120.5 in). TNGA-K replaces the older K platform.

Vehicles using platform (calendar years):

TNGA-L (GA-L)[edit]

The TNGA-L platform underpins unibody vehicles in the E-segment/F-segment/S-segment or mid-size/full-size luxury car/grand tourer categories. The platform is offered in both rear-wheel drive and all-wheel drive variants and is paired with a longitudinal engine. The platform also supports a wheelbase length of 2,870–3,125 mm (113.0–123.0 in). TNGA-L replaces the older N platform.

Vehicles using platform (calendar years):

e-TNGA[edit]

e-TNGA is a modular platform dedicated to battery electric vehicles, which was announced in October 2019.[41] The platform will enable offering various type and size of vehicles, different battery capacity and with front-wheel drive, rear-wheel drive or dual motor all-wheel drive. This vehicle architecture is partitioned into five modules. These are the front module, center module, rear module, battery and motor. Up to three versions of each module are in development, including three capacities for the lithium-ion battery.[42][43][44] The first e-TNGA based model will be the bZ4X crossover, which was presented for the first time in April 2021.[45] Other vehicles planned by 2025 include a medium SUV, a medium minivan, a medium sedan, and a large SUV.[46] For Subaru-badged models, the platform is also known as the e-Subaru Global Platform (e-SGP).[47][48]

Vehicles using platform (calendar years):

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ Akita, Masahiro (11 March 2013). "Opportunities and risks related to parts sourcing for next-gen Prius". Credit Suisse. pp. 1–3. Archived from the original on 17 July 2014.
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  40. ^ a b "New Lexus LS Flagship Sedan to Make Global Debut at the 2017 NAIAS" (Press release). US: Toyota. 8 December 2016. Retrieved 22 December 2016.
  41. ^ "Here Are Some Specs On The Toyota e-TNGA Platform For BEVs". InsideEVs. Retrieved 24 April 2021.
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External links[edit]