Trade Boards Act 1909

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The Trade Boards Act 1909 was a piece of social legislation passed in the United Kingdom in 1909. It provided for the creation of boards which could set minimum wage criteria that were legally enforceable. It was expanded and updated in the Trade Boards Act 1918.The main provision was to set minimum wages in certain trades with the history of low wages, because of surplus of available workers, the presence of women workers, or the lack of skills.[1]

At first it applied to four industries: chain-making, ready-made tailoring, paper-box making, and the machine-made lace and finishing trade.[2] It was later expanded in 1912: mining and then to other industries with preponderance of unskilled manual labor.

Debates[edit]

Winston Churchill MP, put the argument for the legislation as follows.[3]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Wrigley, Chris, Winston Churchill: A Biographical Companion, p327, ISBN 0-87436-990-8
  2. ^ Sheila Blackburn, "Ideology and social policy: the origins of the Trade Boards Act." The Historical Journal 34#1 (1991): 43-64.
  3. ^ "Hansard Series 5, Vol 4, col 388". 28 April 1909. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Blackburn, Sheila. "Ideology and social policy: the origins of the Trade Boards Act." The Historical Journal 34#1 (1991): 43-64.
  • S Webb and B Webb, Industrial Democracy (Longmans 1902)

External links[edit]