Trade Union International of Workers in the Metal Industry

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The Trade Union International of Workers in the Metal Industry was a trade union international affiliated to the World Federation of Trade Unions.

History[edit]

The TUI was founded at a conference in Turin, Italy in June 2, 1949 as the Trade Union International of the Metal and Engineering Industries.[1] (Other sources say June 21.)[2]

In 1998 the TUI merged with the Trade Unions International of Chemical, Oil and Allied Workers and the Trade Union International of Energy Workers to found the Trade Union International of Energy, Metal, Chemical, Oil and Allied Industries at a conference in Havana. In 2007 the latter reformed as the Trade Union International of Energy Workers. The metal and mining workers then formed the Trade Union International of Workers in the Mining, the Metallurgy and the Metal Industries.[3][4]

Organization[edit]

The highest organ of the TUI was the International Trade Conference held every four years which elected an administrative committee and a secretariat.[5] It also had specialized commissions on steel, shipbuilding, the automobile industry, mechanical and electro-electronic constr4uction as well as a Standing Committee on Peace and Disarmament.[6]

In 1955 its address was reported as Seilerstaette 3, Vienna 1, Austria. It shared the address with the Trade Unions International of Miners Unions, the Trade Unions International of Transport Workers and the World Federation of Teachers Unions.[7] By 1957 its headquarters were Janska 100, Prague 1, Czechoslovakia were it again shared the address with the TUIs of Transport Workers, Miners and Teachers[8] [9] By 1978 it moved to BP158 Moscow K9, Soviet Union,[10] an address it would keep until at least 1991.[11]

Members[edit]

At the TUIs founding conference in 1949 there 62 delegates representing 16 countries and seven and half million workers. Five other countries were represented by observers. States represented included the Soviet Union, Czechoslovakia, Italy, France and the Netherlands.[12] In 1958 it claimed 10,050,000 members in 18 countries.[13] In 1976 the TUI included 36 organizations in 28 countries representing 20 million members.[14] And in 1985 it claimed 58 affiliates in 42 countries representing 22 million workers.[15]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Coldrick, A. Percy and Jones, Philip. The international directory of the trade union movement New York : Facts on File, [1978] pp.191-2
  2. ^ The World Federation of Trade Unions, 1945-1985. Prague; Published by the WTFU in cooperation with PRACE Czechoslovak Trade Unions 1985 p.153
  3. ^ Europa World Year Book London; Taylor & Francis, 2004 p.342
  4. ^ World Federation of Trade Unions Report of Action 2006-2010 p.104
  5. ^ Coldrick and Jones p.191
  6. ^ The World Federation of Trade Unions, 1945-1985 p.154
  7. ^ Directory of World Federation of Trade Unions Washington Office of International Labor Affairs, June 1955 pp.47-8
  8. ^ Facts about international Communist front organisations p. 55
  9. ^ Directory of World Federation of Trade Union 1958 pp.53-6
  10. ^ Coldrick and Jones p.192
  11. ^ Upham, Martin Trade unions of the world, 1992-1993. Harlow, Essex, U.K. : Longman ; Detroit, Mich. : Distributed exclusively in the U.S. and Canada by Gale Research Inc., 1991 p.558
  12. ^ Coldrick and Jones p.191
  13. ^ Directory of World Federation of Trade Union 1958 p.53
  14. ^ Coldrick and Jones p.191
  15. ^ The World Federation of Trade Unions, 1945-1985 pp.153-4