Tramea

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Tramea
Libélula (Tramea sp), isla Lobos, islas Galápagos, Ecuador, 2015-07-25, DD 61.jpg
Exemplar of Tramea from the Galápagos Islands (Ecuador)
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Clade: Euarthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Odonata
Infraorder: Anisoptera
Family: Libellulidae
Genus: Tramea
Hagen, 1861[1]

Tramea is a genus of dragonflies in the family Libellulidae,[2] the skimmers and perchers. They are found in tropical and subtropical regions around the globe.[3] They typically have colored bases to their otherwise translucent hindwings. In particular when they fly, this creates the impression of their carrying bags at the start of their abdomens. They are known commonly as saddlebags[4] or saddlebags gliders.[5]

Species[edit]

The genus contains the following species,[6][7] some of which have several subspecies:[8]

Gallery[edit]

Wing markings of Tramea dragonflies are striking and help distinguish different species.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hagen, Hermann (1861). "Synopsis of the Neuroptera of North America with a List of the South American Species". Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections. 4: 347 [143] – via Biodiversity Heritage Library. 
  2. ^ "Genus Tramea Hagen, 1861". Australian Faunal Directory. Australian Biological Resources Study. 2012. Retrieved 28 February 2017. 
  3. ^ Watson, J.A.L.; Theischinger, G.; Abbey, H.M. (1991). The Australian Dragonflies: A Guide to the Identification, Distributions and Habitats of Australian Odonata. Melbourne: CSIRO. p. 278. ISBN 0643051368. 
  4. ^ Tramea. Atlas of Living Australia.
  5. ^ Winterbourn, M. J., Pohe, S. R., & Ball, O. P. (2011). Establishment of larval populations of the dragonfly Tramea loewii Kaup, 1866 (Odonata: Libellulidae) in lakes of northern New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Zoology, 38(2), 173-179.
  6. ^ Tramea. Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS)
  7. ^ a b Martin Schorr; Martin Lindeboom; Dennis Paulson. "World Odonata List". University of Puget Sound. Retrieved 14 March 2015. 
  8. ^ odonata.info (2005)
  9. ^ a b c d e f g "North American Odonata". University of Puget Sound. 2009. Retrieved 5 August 2010. 
  10. ^ Dow, R.A. (2009). "Tramea basilaris". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.3. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 17 January 2012. 
  11. ^ Clausnitzer, V. (2010). "Tramea limbata". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.3. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 17 January 2012. 
  12. ^ Subramanian, K. A. (2005). Dragonflies and Damselflies of Peninsular India (PDF). 
  13. ^ Theischinger, G.; Hawking, J. (2007). The complete field guide to dragonflies of Australia. Collingwood, Vic.: CSIRO Publishing. ISBN 978-0-643-09073-6. 
  14. ^ Dunkle, S. W. (2000). Dragonflies through Binoculars. New York: Oxford University Press. p. 219. ISBN 0-19-511268-7. 
  15. ^ Theischinger, G; Hawking, J (2006). The Complete Field Guide to Dragonflies of Australia. Collingwood Vic.: CSIRO Publishing. p. 298. ISBN 978 0 64309 073 6. 
  16. ^ Wilson, K. D. P., Rowe, R. & Marinov, M. (2011). "Tramea transmarina". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.3. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 17 January 2012.