Tran Dinh Truong

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Trường Đình Trần (1932 – May 6, 2012),[1] a Vietnamese-American, was born in South Vietnam.

Biography[edit]

Tran was the principal owner of the Vishipco Line, the largest shipping company in South Vietnam in the 1970s. As a shipowner, he earned millions of dollars hauling cargo for the United States military.[2] His actions during the last day of the Fall of Saigon have been the subject of debate. Tran states that he used his company's resources, including 24 commercial ships and hundreds of trucks, to aid in the evacuation of thousands of South Vietnamese civilians and military personnel to escape from Vietnam.[1][3] He let his ships, inclusive the Truong Xuan (with Captain Pham Ngoc Luy) carried free more than 3,000 Vietnamese fleeing Saigon after the Communists invasion.[4]

Tran left Vietnam on April 30, 1975, the day that Saigon fell to the communists.[5] Tran boarded one of his eleven ships and traveled to the United States with two suitcases of gold.[6]

He began his hotel business in New York City, first with the Hotel Opera on the Upper West Side in Manhattan, and then Hotel Carter (with low prices, which was deemed the dirtiest hotel in the US in 2009[7]) in Midtown Manhattan and Hotel Lafayette in Buffalo, New York. Along the way Tran owned and operated other New York hotels as well, including the infamous Hotel Kenmore Hall on 23rd Street which was seized from Tran by the US Marshals Service in 1994 because of deplorable conditions and rampant crime within the building.[2]

After the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States he contributed $2 million of his personal funds to the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund and in 2003, the Asian American Federation honored his actions.[8][9] In 1984 during the famine in Ethiopia, he also purchased two helicopters valued at around 3.2 million dollars for the hunger relief organization in Ethiopia.[1][10][11] In August 2005, he donated $100,000 to the victims of Hurricane Katrina.[12]

In May 2004, Tran was awarded a Golden Torch Award, by the Vietnamese American National Gala in Washington, D.C. Mr. Tran was also on the Board of Directors of The United Way of New York City.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c (in Vietnamese) Nhà hảo tâm Trần Đình Trường từ trần, RFA, 2012-05-08
  2. ^ a b *Faison, Seth. "In Largest Drug-Law Takeover, U.S. Seizes New York City Hotel", New York Times, 1994-6-9. Retrieved on January 20, 2009.
  3. ^ Truong Xuan Scholarship Fund
  4. ^ (in English) Truong Xuan's Last Voyage, from Pham Ngoc Luy
  5. ^ *Faison, Seth with Jo Thomas. "Empire of Hotels Riddled With Crime and Drugs", New York Times, 1994-7-6. Retrieved on January 20, 2009.
  6. ^ *Faison, Seth with Jo Thomas. "Empire of Hotels Riddled With Crime and Drugs", New York Times, 1994-7-6. Retrieved on January 20, 2009. He let his ships, inclusive Truong Xuan ship (with Captain Pham Ngoc Luy) carried free more than 3,000 Vietnamese fleeing Saigon after the Communists invasion.
  7. ^ "Carter wears smudged crown as USA's 'dirtiest hotel'". USA Today. 2009-01-30. Retrieved 2011-02-10. 
  8. ^ "Asian American Federation Honors Outstanding". Asian American Federation. Archived from the original on 2007-12-11. Retrieved 2007-12-28. 
  9. ^ Gặp doanh nhân Việt hiến 2 triệu USD cho nạn nhân ở New York, VnExpress, 26/9/2001
  10. ^ (in Vietnamese) Theo cuộc nói chuyện với ông Trường và bà Sang trong Video "Vân Sơn 44: In Connecticut - Nhớ Nhà", 2010, see trích đoạn Video on YouTube
  11. ^ (in Vietnamese) Thủ Đô Tỵ Nạn VN Chào Đón Đại Nhạc Hội ‘Mùa Hè Rực Rỡ’, Việt báo, 2/8/2003
  12. ^ Tỉ phú gốc Việt Trần Ðình Trường qua đời, Người Việt, 8/5/2012

External links[edit]