TransCanada Corporation

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TransCanada Corporation
Public
Traded as TSXTRP
NYSETRP
S&P/TSX 60 component
Industry Oil and gas
Electricity
Founded 1951
Headquarters Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Key people
Russ Girling, President and CEO
Products Electric power
Services Pipeline transport
Natural gas storage
Number of employees
4,800[1]
Website www.transcanada.com
TransCanada Tower, company head office in Calgary

TransCanada Corporation is a major North American energy company based in Calgary, Alberta, developing and operating energy infrastructure in North America. Its pipeline network includes approximately 3,460 kilometres (2,150 miles) of oil pipeline, plus approximately 68,500 kilometres (42,564 miles) of wholly owned and 11,500 kilometres (7,146 miles) of partially owned gas pipeline that connects with virtually all major gas supply basins in North America. TransCanada is one of the continent’s largest providers of gas storage and related services with approximately 407 billion cubic feet (1.15×1010 m3) of storage capacity.[citation needed] TransCanada also owns, or has interests in, approximately 11,800 megawatts of power generation.[2]

TransCanada is the largest shareholder in, and owns the general partner of, TC PipeLines, LP. The company was founded in 1951 in Calgary.[3] In January 2014, 46% of the ownership of TransCanada was by institutional shareholders.[4]


Pipelines[edit]

Wholly owned pipelines:

Affiliated pipelines:

Keystone Pipeline[edit]

TransCanada maintains that people have public access to the pipeline, thus supporting criteria for eminent domain. "It's open for anyone to do business on our pipeline, we welcome business to our pipe." said TransCanada Media Relations Michael Barnes.[5]

At one point in October 2011, TransCanada was involved in up to 56 separate eminent domain actions against landowners in Texas and South Dakota who have refused to give permission to the company to build the Keystone Pipeline on their land.[6] However, on August 23, 2012, Texas Judge Bill Harris ruled that TransCanada has the legal right of eminent domain and may lease or purchase land from owners who refused to sign an agreement with the company for the public right-of-way of a pipeline. The landowners had claimed that because the pipeline was not open to other companies, it did not meet the criteria for eminent domain.[7]

On September 27, 2012, protesters began tree sitting in the path of the Keystone pipeline near Winnsboro, Texas. Eight people stood on tree platforms just ahead of where crews were cutting down trees to make way for the pipeline.[8]

On October 4, 2012, actress and activist Daryl Hannah and 78-year-old Texas landowner Eleanor Fairchild were arrested for criminal trespassing and other charges after they were accused of standing in front of TransCanada pipeline construction equipment on Fairchild's farm in Winnsboro, a town about 100 miles east of Dallas.[9] Ms. Fairchild has owned the land since 1983 and refused to sign any agreements with TransCanada. Her land was seized by eminent domain.

British Columbia gas export pipelines[edit]

As of June 2013 these projects remain subject to regulatory approval and licensing.[10][11]

In June 2012 it was announced that TransCanada was selected by Shell and partners Korea Gas Corporation, Mitsubishi Corporation and PetroChina Company Limited to design, build, own and operate[11] the Coastal GasLink pipeline between northeastern B.C. oil fields near Dawson Creek, British Columbia and an LNG facility export facility on the Douglas Channel near Kitimat, British Columbia.[12][13][14][15]

In January 2013 it was announced that TransCanada was selected by Petronas to design, build, own, and operate[10] the Prince Rupert Gas Transmission project, a gas pipeline that would transport natural gas from the Montney region near Fort St. John, British Columbia to a LNG terminal planned by Progress Energy Canada Ltd. in Port Edward, British Columbia on Lelu Island near Prince Rupert, British Columbia.[16]

TransCanada's existing NGTL system in northeastern B.C. will be expanded and integrated into the new export pipeline systems.[10][12]

Pipelines in Alberta[edit]

In October 2012, TransCanada formed a 50-50 CAD$3bn joint-venture with Phoenix Energy Holdings Ltd. (the Canadian subsidiary of PetroChina) to develop the 500 km Grand Rapids Pipeline.[17]

Power plants[edit]

Other projects[edit]

  • Broadwater LNG: In April 2009, the company announced that it won a contract to build and control a gas pipeline on the Pacific Coast of Mexico.[19]
  • Palomar Gas Transmission Pipeline: The company is partnering with NW Natural in a plan to build a 220-mile (350 km) gas pipeline in Oregon running from the proposed Bradwood Landing LNG terminal to connect with existing pipeline.[20]
  • Energie Cacouna: In February 2008, TCPL announced that it would delay indefinitely its LNG project in fr:Cacouna, Quebec,[21] while the economy of the project ameliorated.[22] This project was initiated in 2004, and the environmental and logistical permits were granted in 2006.

https://www.facebook.com/DefendOurClimate/photos/a.173422149526941.1073741829.173372496198573/426759134193240/?type=1&theater http://canadians.org/media/transcanada-drilling-boreholes-bay-fundy-project-approved

August 27, 2015 An Open Letter from concerned New Brunswick Groups to: Russ Girling, CEO, TransCanada Corporation Address: TransCanada Corporation, 450 - 1 Street SW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2P 5H1 General E-mail: (Energy East Contact Information) energyeast@transcanada.com

Peter Watson, Chair and CEO, National Energy Board Address: 517 Tenth Avenue SW, Calgary, Alberta, T2R 0A8 The Honourable Leona Aglukkaq, Environment Canada (Minister responsible for Species at Risk Act (SARA), North American Waterfowl Management Plan, Migratory Birds Convention Act) Address: Environment Canada, 10, rue Wellington, Gatineau, Quebec, K1A 0H3 E-mail: minister@ec.gc.ca The Honourable Gail Shea, Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, Government of Canada Address: Minister’s Office, 200 Kent Street, Station 15N100, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0A6 E-mail: Min@dfo-mpo.gc.ca Atlantic Regional Office Fisheries and Oceans Canada P.O. Box 1035 Dartmouth, Nova Scotia B2Y 4T3 Fisheries Protection Program Fisheries and Oceans Canada 343 University Avenue, Moncton, New Brunswick E1C 9B6 Telephone: 506-851-2824 Email: gulfhabitatgolfe@dfo-mpo.gc.ca The Honourable Denis Landry, Minister of Natural Resources, Government of New Brunswick (Minister responsible for Species at Risk Act (SARA)) Address: Hugh John Flemming Forestry Centre, 1350 Regent Street, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3C 2G6 E-mail: denis.landry2@gnb.ca The Honourable Rick Doucet, Minister of Agriculture, Aquaculture and Fisheries, Government of New Brunswick Address: Agricultural Research Station (Experimental Farm), 850 Lincoln Road, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 8B7 E-mail: rick.doucet@gnb.ca The Honourable Premier Brian Gallant, Government of New Brunswick Address: Office of the Premier, Chancery Place, P. O. Box 6000, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1 Email : premier@gnb.ca The Honourable Donald Arsenault, Minister of Energy & Mines, Government of New Brunswick Address: P. O. Box 6000, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1 E-mail: Tyler.Campbell@gnb.ca

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Saint John Mayor Mel Norton and Council Address: Common Clerk's Office 8th Floor, City Hall, PO Box 1971, Saint John, New Brunswick, E2L 4L1 E-mail for Common Clerk’s Office: commonclerk@saintjohn.ca E-mail for Mayor Mel Norton: mel.norton@saintjohn.ca Jim Quinn, President & Chief Executive Officer, Port Saint John Address: 111 Water Street, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada E2L 0B1 E-mail: jquinn@sjport.com RE: BOREHOLE TESTING OFF RED HEAD, NEW BRUNSWICK BY TRANSCANADA PLANNED TO START AUGUST 27, 2015

A 6-page work plan has come to our attention which shows TransCanada is days away from borehole testing off the shore of Red Head, New Brunswick in the Bay of Fundy.

The local residents, to our knowledge, were not notified about this work plan. This procedure is invasive and has the potential to hurt residents’ foundations and drinking water, along with the natural environment that we all value and protect. Why are boreholes being drilled before this project is approved without consultation with residents and others affected? We had understood that there would be a review process of the Energy East proposal through the National Energy Board, followed by an application for all necessary Federal and Provincial approvals and permits. To our knowledge, none of these first significant steps have happened. It would appear that no such review and approval/permit process is being followed.

Borehole testing could have significant impacts that must be addressed prior to any approval or work being conducted. Will there be any foot or vehicle traffic on Anthony’s Cove Road? If yes, this needs to be described and quantified. Offshore borehole testing forms part of the land use application for this project and cannot be done until all approvals/permits have been issued by the City for the use of this land. Will baseline testing be conducted (predrilling survey and well water testing) prior to any work so that there is reference information in case a problem is reported by a homeowner? It is well known that this land area is clay-based and pounding will transmit through this clay and (a) could cause vibration to homes resulting in damage and (b) could accelerate the movement of Anthony’s Cove Road towards the sea and cause damage to homes, road and shoreline. Will noise be quantified and what times will the work be conducted? In particular, our concern about the noise from this work is (a) the effect on shorebirds – sandpipers gather and stop this time of year on their migration to South America, and Canadian Geese and ducks are beginning to gather for their migration and (b) the effect that this potential noise could have on residential property.

We emphasize again that the Energy East pipeline project has not been approved; Energy East is only a proposal and a significant number of residents and groups in New Brunswick are still awaiting word from the National Energy Board on their intervenor status in the review process. Furthermore, this shore and seabed is on unceded Wolastoq territory. There has been no free, prior, and informed consent obtained from the Indigenous communities.

The secrecy around this work plan, including what consultation, permits, and approvals have been carried out, is troubling. Is this an indication of how Trans Canada plans to conduct this entire project? Still fresh in our collective memory is the deaths of 5,000-10,000 migratory birds were killed in September 2013 at the Canaport LNG terminal around the corner from the Red Head work area. Why would TransCanada conduct this work just as migratory birds and whales are coming into the Bay of Fundy in increasing numbers in August & September?

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Attached we have outlined our concerns and questions with this work plan. Given the lack of consultation and long list of concerns we are requesting that all work on borehole testing be stopped until these concerns are addressed. Please send all responses to this letter to the following contact: Mark D’Arcy and Caroline Lubbe-D’Arcy, Council of Canadians - Fredericton Chapter Address: 379 Northumberland Street, Fredericton, New Brunswick, E3B 3K2 E-mail: markandcaroline@gmail.com Sincerely, Canaan-Washademoak Watershed Association Citizen’s Coalition for Clean Air Concerned Citizens of Penobsquis Council of Canadians – Fredericton Chapter Council of Canadians - Kent County NB Chapter Council of Canadians - Moncton Chapter Council of Canadians – Saint John NB Chapter Ecology Action Centre Friends of Musquash Green Light Maliseet Nation Conservation Council Memramcook Action New Brunswick Anti-Shale Gas Alliance New Brunswickers Against Fracking PEACE NB Penniac Anti-Shale-Gas Organization Public for the Protection of the Forests of New Brunswick (PPFNB) Red Head-Anthony’s Cove Preservation Association Sentinelles de la riviére Petitcodiac / Petitcodiac Riverkeepers Sierra Club Canada Foundation – Atlantic Canada Chapter Sustainable Energy Group – Woodstock Tantramar Alliance Against Hydro-Fracking Voices for Sustainable Environments & Communities Julie Guillemot, Professeure en gestion de l'environnement, Université de Moncton, Campus de Shippagan (UMCS) Alain Patoine, Professeur en gestion de l’environnement, Université de Moncton, Campus de Shippagan (UMCS)

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André Robichaud, Professeur de géographie, Université de Moncton, Campus de Shippagan (UMCS) Background

Our understanding of the impacts of borehole testing comes in part from this document:

http://www.canlii.org/en/qc/qccs/doc/2014/2014qccs4398/2014qccs4398.pdf DECISION - Province of Quebec Superior Court, 28pp SEPTEMBER 23, 2014

(page 11) "[45] Last April, TransCanada performed seismic work. To do so, it obtained the DFO’s authorization at the federal level but not, it would appear, from the government of Quebec. The seismic work produced pulsating noise (from blasting), whereas the geotechnical work will produce continuous noise."

(page 12) "[48] - The area in which there may be negative behavioural reactions ranging from subtle behaviour modification to complete avoidance is vast (several dozens of kilometres from the source);" (page 12) “[49] Pursuant to the federal species at risk statute, Mr. Kemp of the Species at Risk Division of the DFO completed an initial analysis of the geotechnical work. Then, following the decision of TransCanada to use two barges to drill simultaneously, he prepared a second analysis.”

Concerns Some of our concerns include the following:

1. There has been no proper community consultation and notification of the project.

Less than a month ago, TransCanada officials held a community liaison meeting (closed to the public) with five (5) Red Head residents on July 15 , 2015, but only made a very brief reference to this project without giving any details or timeframe. The wider community did not learn of the work plan and August 27th start date until a document was delivered a week ago a Red Head resident by an anonymous source.

2. Early work will set the stage for how little or thorough the review and regulatory process is.

With the magnitude of this proposed Energy East project in Red Head - a 150-hectare tank farm capable of housing 7.6 million barrels of oil and a 183-hectare marine terminal complex - this project needs to undergo a complete and thorough information gathering, consultation process, and review process. This includes protection/conservation plans for migratory birds, fisheries, marine mammals, federal government acts and regulations, provincial government acts and regulations, and port authority and municipal procedures.

3. This shore and seabed is on unceded Wolastoq territory. There has been no free, prior, and informed consent obtained from the Indigenous communities.

The Saint John River Basin are the traditional lands of the Wolastoqiyik, which translates to mean ‘the people of the beautiful bountiful river’, and is the present location of six (6) Wolastoq (Maliseet) First Nations; the Saint John River Basin in New Brunswick is territory where

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aboriginal land title and rights have never been ceded or surrendered by the Wolastoqey Nation. Instead, both New Brunswick and Indigenous people are bound by pre-Confederation treaties called the Peace and Friendship treaties.

4. Impact and mitigation measures to property owners with homes along the shore of Anthony’s Cove.

5. Impact and mitigation to fisheries (e.g. lobster and groundfish).

6. Impact and mitigation measures to diving birds.

The Bay of Fundy receives a large number of species of waterfowl, shorebirds and seabirds, the highest bird species richness in the Canadian Atlantic. These include iconic birds such as the Atlantic Puffin, Razorbill Auk, and Semipalmated Sandpiper;

7. Impact and mitigation measures to migratory birds.

The salt marshes, and vast stretches of mudflats of the Bay of Fundy exposed twice a day during low tide, are a critical feeding stopover area along the eastern seaboard of North America for 34 species of fall migrating birds on their way to Central and South America, including hundreds of thousands of sandpipers and plovers, making it one of six (6) Canadian sites in the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network.

8. Impact and mitigation measures to marine mammals, including harbour porpoises.

9. Impact and mitigation measures to marine mammals designated as endangered under Federal and Provincial Species-at-Risk legislation, including the North Atlantic Right Whale.

The rich zooplankton, krill, and fish in the Bay of Fundy which attracts over a dozen whale species (http://new-brunswick.net/new-brunswick/whales/), including each summer, two-thirds of the 350-400 remaining population of North Atlantic Right Whales, one of the most endangered marine mammals in the world;

Questions Our questions and request for the following information:

1. Why is this work being conducted before the Energy East project has been approved? There is a large number of approvals and permits that are required by both the Federal Government and Provincial Governments.

2. What steps have TransCanada and the Government of New Brunswick taken to consult and gain consent from the Indigenous communities for this specific project?

3. Will there be any foot or vehicle traffic on Anthony’s Cove Road? If yes, this needs to be described and quantified. Offshore borehole testing forms part of the land use application for this project and cannot be done until all approvals/permits have been issued by the City for the use of this land.

4. Will baseline testing be conducted (predrilling survey and well water testing) prior to any work so that there is reference information in case a problem is reported by a homeowner? It is well known that this land area is clay-based and pounding will transmit

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through this clay and (a) could cause vibration to homes resulting in damage and (b) could accelerate the movement of Anthony’s Cove Road towards the sea and cause damage to homes, road and shoreline. All homes adjacent to this work should have a predrilling survey done and well water testing done – quality/quantity - to determine a baseline for future reference if a problem is reported by a homeowner.

5. Will noise above the water be quantified and what times will the work be conducted? Our concern is for noise travelling through the air and (a) the effect to shorebirds – sandpipers gather and stop this time of year on their migration to South America, and Canadian Geese and ducks are beginning to gather for their migration and (b) the effect that this potential noise could have on residential property.

6. Will noise in the water be quantified and what times will the work be conducted? Our concern is for noise travelling through the water, particularly (a) the effect on the fisheries (e.g. lobster, sturgeon), and (b) the effect on marine mammals (e.g. harbour porpoises, whales).

7. Have you asked government departments and whale researchers about the potential disruption and impact that this borehole testing will have on marine mammals in the Bay of Fundy, including the North Atlantic Right Whale?

8. If so, what information have you received from government departments and whale researchers? What additional mitigating measures have been advised that would reduce the disruption or impact to acceptable levels?

9. Have you requested and received a permit to conduct this borehole testing from the New Brunswick Minister responsible for the provincial Species at Risk Act? The North Atlantic Right Whale is listed as an endangered marine mammal under this Act.

10. Have you requested and received a permit to conduct this borehole testing from the Canadian Minister responsible for the federal Species at Risk Act? The North Atlantic Right Whale is listed as an endangered marine mammal under this Act.

11. What are the Government of New Brunswick current and future commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (CO2 and methane)? Are you meeting those targets? Note that the Provincial Premiers in Ontario and Quebec have just recently adopted carbon pricing.

12. Will these greenhouse gas reduction steps be counteracted by increased greenhouse emissions from increased oil-by-rail infrastructure at Red Head, and Energy East infrastructure such as the proposed pipeline through unceded territory in New Brunswick, and the proposed tank farm and marine terminal at Red Head?

Corporate governance[edit]

Members of the board of directors of TransCanada are S. Barry Jackson (Chair), Russ Girling (President and CEO), Kevin E. Benson, Derek Burney, John Richels, Paule Gauthier, Paula Rosput Reynolds, Mary Pat Salomone, W. Thomas Stephens, D. Michael G. Stewart and Richard E. Waugh. [23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ TransCanada Power Marketing - About Us
  3. ^ Kilbourn, William (1970). Pipeline: TransCanada and the Great Debate. p. 29. 
  4. ^ NASDAQ: "TransCanada Corporation Institutional Ownership"
  5. ^ http://www.kxii.com/home/headlines/Lamar-County-landowner-appeals-TransCanada-pipeline-217699311.html
  6. ^ "Eminent Domain Fight Has a Canadian Twist". New York Times. Oct 17, 2011. 
  7. ^ "Keystone pipeline clears a hurdle". Washington Post. Aug 22, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Protesters in Texas climb trees to block pipeline work". Houston Chronicle. September 25, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Daryl Hannah freed following arrest in pipeline protest". Chicago Sun-Times. Oct 6, 2012. 
  10. ^ a b c "TransCanada Selected to Develop $6 Billion in Natural Gas Infrastructure to Prince Rupert, British Columbia" (news release). TransCanada. January 9, 2013. Retrieved June 12, 2013. 
  11. ^ a b "TransCanada Selected by Shell and Partners to Develop Multi-Billion Dollar Natural Gas Pipeline to Canada’s West Coast" (news release). TransCanada. June 5, 2012. Retrieved June 12, 2013. 
  12. ^ a b Lauren Krugel (January 9, 2013). "TransCanada to build $5-billion shale gas pipeline project near Prince Rupert" (blog). The Tyee. Retrieved June 12, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Home page". Coastal GasLink Pipeline Ltd., a wholly owned subsidiary of TransCanada PipeLines Limited. Retrieved June 12, 2013. Coastal GasLink Pipeline Ltd., a wholly owned subsidiary of TransCanada PipeLines Limited, proposes to develop a natural gas pipeline from northeast B.C. to the west coast of B.C. to serve export markets. 
  14. ^ Coastal GasLink Pipeline project description
  15. ^ Nathan VanderKlippe (June 5, 2012). "TransCanada wins $4-billion pipeline contract". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved June 12, 2013. 
  16. ^ Darren Campbell (January 9, 2013). "B.C. LNG exports take a step forward with TransCanada announcement: TCPL to build $5.1 billion pipeline that will feed coastal terminal". Alberta Oil Magazine. Retrieved June 12, 2013. 
  17. ^ "TransCanada Corp And Phoenix Energy Holdings Ltd. Form Joint Venture To Develop Grand Rapids Pipeline System"
  18. ^ http://www.lapresse.ca/le-soleil/affaires/actualite-economique/201307/31/01-4675921-becancour-1-milliard-pour-une-centrale-au-gaz-fermee.php
  19. ^ "Otras noticias internacionales". The Wall Street Journal. 2009-05-07. 
  20. ^ Palomar website
  21. ^ Bourque (8 February 2008). "Petro-Canada suspend le projet de Gros Cacouna". La Presse. ISSN 0317-9249. 
  22. ^ Cousineau (16 February 2008). "Tout cela pour cela?". La Presse. ISSN 0317-9249. 
  23. ^ "Board of Directors". Retrieved October 3, 2014. 

External links[edit]