Transfermarkt

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transfermarkt
Transfermarkt.png
Available in German, English, Dutch, Turkish, Polish, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian
Owner Axel Springer AG
Matthias Seidel
Created by Matthias Seidel
Website www.transfermarkt.de
www.transfermarkt.co.uk
Launched May 2000
Current status Active

transfermarkt is a German-based[1] website owned by Axel Springer that has footballing information, such as scores, results, statistics, transfer news, and fixtures.[2] According to the IVW, it is in the top 25 most visited German websites, and one of the largest sport websites after kicker.de.[3]

The website has scores, results, transfer news, fixtures, and player values. Despite the player values, along with some other facts, being estimates,[4] researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance have found that the "rumours" of player transfers are largely accurate.[5]

History[edit]

The website was founded in May 2000, by Matthias Seidel. In 2008, Axel Springer publishing house took over, gaining a 51% share in the website. Seidel kept the other 49% of the shares.[6] The English-language version started in 2009.

On 19 May 2014, a relaunch took place for the so-called update to 'version 4'. In the course of this update there were both server-technical as well as data-legal issues, as private data was visible to other users for an indefinite period of time.[7] For 48 hours the site had only a very limited availability, resulting in multiple complaints on Facebook.[8] The biggest criticisms from users was the confusing new design. As a result, Transfermarkt.de publicly apologized for the incidents and issues that were caused during the relaunch.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Report for transfermarkt.co.uk | Norton Safe Web". Safeweb.norton.com. Retrieved 26 May 2013. 
  2. ^ "The Football Portal for the Premier League and Transfer Rumour Forum". transfermarkt.co.uk. Retrieved 26 May 2013. 
  3. ^ Schröder, Jens (8 September 2010). "Online-IVW: Sport gewinnt, News verliert" [Online-IVW: Sport wins, News loses]. meedia.de. Retrieved 27 July 2013. 
  4. ^ Ahrens, Peter (6 August 2010). "Bundesliga-Transfers: Magie des Pinkepinke-Plans" [Bundesliga transfers: Magic of the dough plan] (in German). Spiegel Online. Retrieved 26 July 2013. 
  5. ^ Bryson, Alex; Frick, Bernd; Simmons, Rob (September 2009). "The Returns to Scarce Talent: Footedness and Player Remuneration in European Soccer" (PDF). cep.lse.ac.uk. Retrieved 26 July 2013. 
  6. ^ "Axel Springer übernimmt Mehrheit an Deutschlands größter Fußball-Community" [Axel Springer acquires majority stake in Germany's biggest football community]. meedia.de. 23 September 2008. Retrieved 27 July 2013. 
  7. ^ Linder, Armin (20 May 2014). "Daten-Leck bei Transfermarkt.de" [Data leak on Transfermarkt.de] (in German). TZ.de. Retrieved 23 July 2014. 
  8. ^ Wietlisbach, Oliver (20 May 2014). "Am Montag lancierte "Transfermarkt" seine neue Website. Dabei ging schief, was schief gehen konnte. Sogar private Nachrichten waren plötzlich für andere einsehbar" [On Monday "Transfermarket" launched a new website. Everything that could go wrong, went wrong. Even private messages were suddenly visible to others.] (in German). watson.ch. Retrieved 23 July 2014. 
  9. ^ Seidel, Matthias (23 May 2014). "Transfermarkt sagt Entschuldigung" [Transfermarkt apologizes] (in German). transfermarkt.de. Retrieved 23 July 2014.