Transhimalaya

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"Transhimalayan" redirects here. For the Trans-Himalayan language family, see Sino-Tibetan languages.

The Transhimalaya (also spelled Trans-Himalaya) or "Gangdise – Nyenchen Tanglha range", is a 1600-kilometer-long mountain range in China, extending in a west–east direction parallel to the main Himalayan range. Located north of Yarlung Tsangpo river on the southern edge of the Tibetan Plateau, the Transhimalaya is composed of the Gangdise range to the west and the Nyenchen Tanglha range to the east.

The Trans-Himalaya, named by Sven Hedin, was described by the Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer in 1952 as an "ill-defined mountain area" with "no marked crest line or central alignment and no division by rivers." On more-modern maps the Kailas Range, or Kang-to-sé Shan in the west is shown as distinct from the Nyenchen Tanglha range in the east.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allen 2013, p. 142.

Sources[edit]

Coordinates: 30°15′45.45″N 90°41′9.45″E / 30.2626250°N 90.6859583°E / 30.2626250; 90.6859583