Palm Beach County Fire Rescue

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Palm Beach County Fire Rescue
Pbcfr.jpg
When seconds count, count on us! [1]
Operational area
Country  United States
State  Florida
County Palm Beach
Agency overview[2]
Established October 1st 1984
Annual calls 132,716 (2016)
Employees 1,514
Annual budget $383 million (2017)
Staffing Career
Fire chief Mike Mackey
EMS level ALS
IAFF 2928
Facilities and equipment[2]
Battalions 7
Stations 49
Engines 43
Quints 5
Squads 2 (Special Ops)
Tenders 4
HAZMAT 2 (Special Ops)
USAR 2 (Special Ops)
Airport crash 5
Wildland 19
Helicopters 2
Light and air 1
Website
Official website
IAFF website

The Palm Beach County Fire Rescue provides fire protection, emergency medical services, ALS transport and hazardous materials mitigation for unincorporated parts of Palm Beach County, Florida and 19 cities under contract.[3]

The department is responsible for 1,813 square miles (4,700 km2), providing services to almost 900,000 residents throughout the county.[4] Along with the unincorporated areas of the county, PBCFR provides services for Belle Glade, Cloud Lake, Glen Ridge, Haverhill, Juno Beach, Jupiter, Lake Clarke Shores, Lake Park, Lake Worth, Lantana, Manalapan, Pahokee, Palm Springs, Royal Palm Beach, South Bay, South Palm Beach and Wellington.[5]

Operations[edit]

Engine 28

Combat Operations, Structure and Staffing[edit]

The department is made up of 7 battalions which contain anywhere from 3 to 9 fire stations. The battalions are numbered as follows:

  • Battalion 1: 7 stations, serving the north county area (Jupiter, Lake Park, Jupiter Farms etc.)
  • Battalion 2: 9 stations, serving the western county area (Royal Palm Beach, Wellington, Loxahatchee, etc.),
  • Battalion 3: 13 stations, serving the central county area and is divided into 2 districts:
    • District 10: 6 stations, serving Westgtate, Palm Springs, Haverhill, Cloud Lake unincorporated Palm Beach County areas such a Century Village West Palm
    • District 3: 7 stations, serving Lake Worth, Lantana, Manalapan, South Palm Beach, Lake Clarke Shores etc.
  • Battalion 4: 8 stations, serving suburban Boynton Beach, Suburban Delray Beach.
  • Battalion 5: 7 stations, serving suburban Boca Raton including Boca West, Loggers Run, Mission Bay.
  • Battalion 7: 3 stations, serving the Glades area including Pahokee, Canal Point, Belle Glade, South Bay, US27 from Broward to Hendry County lines, John Stretch Park, several sugar mills and agricultural areas, Lake Okeechobee.
  • Battalion 9 (Special Operations)- 4 stations, including PBIA and Trauma Hawk.

Special Operations[edit]

The department has two special operations apparatus. These multipurpose units function as heavy rescues, HazMats, USAR and rescue squads. Locate at stations 19 and 34, they are responsible for hazardous materials incidents, dive rescue, confined space rescue and high angle rescue.[6] They also assist the Sheriff's Office's Explosive Ordnance Disposal Team.[7] The units also function as mobile command center on extended operations.

Airport Operations[edit]

The PBCFR is responsible for providing aircraft rescue and firefighting for the Palm Beach International Airport, one the 50 busiest airports in the United States. The station which is located near the center of the airport grounds, is home to 13 pieces of specialized fire fighting equipment.[8]

These apparatus include:

Trauma Hawk[edit]

The Palm Beach County Fire Rescue partners with the Palm Beach County Health Care District to operate the Trauma Hawk Aero-Medical Program.[13] The Trauma Hawk program, established in November 1990, replaced the use of Palm Beach County Sheriff's Office helicopters to medevac critically injured patients to area hospitals.[13] At the Trauma Hawk Station, located at the south west corner of Palm Beach International Airport, the department has two Sikorsky S-76C helos.[14] The air ambulances are identically equipped and can carry two patients each and up to four medical attendants if needed.[14] Each helicopter is staffed with a pilot, a registered nurse (RN) and a paramedic. The nurses and paramedics are Palm Beach County Fire Rescue employees while the pilots are Health Care District employees.[13]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Palm Beach County Fire Rescue". Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. Retrieved 29 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b "FY2014 Fact Sheet" (PDF). Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 
  3. ^ "About Us". Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 
  4. ^ http://discover.pbcgov.org/pbcfr/PDF/FactSheet.pdf
  5. ^ "Area's Served". Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 
  6. ^ "Apparatus List". Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 
  7. ^ "Special Operations". Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 
  8. ^ "Station 81". Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 
  9. ^ "Air Stair 1". Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 
  10. ^ "Dragon 1". Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 
  11. ^ "Foam 81". Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 
  12. ^ "Support 81". Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 
  13. ^ a b c "Trauma Hawk". Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 
  14. ^ a b "Station Trauma Hawk". Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 

Coordinates: 26°42′N 80°3′W / 26.700°N 80.050°W / 26.700; -80.050