This is a good article. Click here for more information.

Travelling Without Moving

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Travelling Without Moving
A close-up of a yellow emblem with green, white and red stripes above it. A silhouette man with buffalo horns is imprinted on it. The band name and album title are displayed on top.
Studio album by
Released28 August 1996 (1996-08-28)
Studio
Genre
Length67:22
Label
Producer
Jamiroquai chronology
Jay's Selection
(1996)
Travelling Without Moving
(1996)
In Store Jam
(1997)
Singles from Travelling Without Moving
  1. "Do U Know Where You're Coming From"
    Released: 20 May 1996
  2. "Virtual Insanity"
    Released: 19 August 1996
  3. "Cosmic Girl"
    Released: 25 November 1996
  4. "Alright"
    Released: 28 April 1997
  5. "High Times"
    Released: 1 December 1997

Travelling Without Moving is the third studio album by English funk and acid jazz band Jamiroquai, released on 28 August 1996 in Japan, then on 9 September 1996 in the United Kingdom under Sony Soho Square. Front-man Jay Kay conceived the album to widen the band's universal appeal, revolving around "cars, life and love".[1] Critics have generally praised the album for being more focused and refined than the band's previous work while others panned its lyrics and found the album too derivative. Kay also faced backlash from press for his use of sports cars in this period despite his environmental beliefs.

The album was the band's American breakthrough. It marked the band's first entry in the US Billboard 200 chart at number 24. In the UK, it peaked at number two. Its singles "Virtual Insanity", "Cosmic Girl" and "Alright" entered the top-ten in the UK singles chart. In the US, "Alright" entered the Billboard Hot 100 at number 78, while "Cosmic Girl" and "High Times" were in the top-ten in the Dance Club Songs charts. The music video for "Virtual Insanity" contributed to the album's success. Travelling Without Moving sold over 8 million copies worldwide, holding the Guinness World Records as the best-selling funk album in history. The album was reissued in 2013 in remastered form with bonus material.

Background[edit]

After experiencing a stressful period while recording The Return of the Space Cowboy, Kay sought to make the next album more focused and universal. He also did not want to remain as a semi-underground act "that stuck to its little niche and sold one and a half million albums every time. I wanted to breakout and be something bigger, more international."[2] Speaking of the album's general mood, Kay said: "[With Emergency on Planet Earth], people weren't cheering in the streets or anything, and [The Return of the Space Cowboy] was quite sad. With [Travelling Without Moving], I decided it was important to show people we could enjoy ourselves. That's why it's cars, life and love".[1] Kay booked the band into the residential studio Great Linford Manor so that they could work at their own pace.[2][3]

Composition[edit]

The first song composed for the album was "Virtual Insanity". It was recorded as a rough demo and was not fully realised until the album's final recording stage.[2] The song has a piano opening with "buoyant keyboards and soaring strings."[4][5] Its lyrics are about the prevalence of technology and the replication and simulation of life.[1] The second track "Cosmic Girl" is a disco song with "spacey" lyrics, based on rhythmic "looped beats" "to give it an off-center, otherworldly" sound.[6] For the next track "Use The Force" the group channels "that real vintage football vibe",[2] filled with horns, wah-wah guitar and a rippling barrage of Latin percussion".[7] The fourth track "Everyday" is described "as seductive as any Maxwell ballad" and has "over aching strings and a come-hither bass line".[8] The fifth song, "Alright", was described as an "easy-going disco-funk" track.[7]

"High Times", a song with "razor-edged funky guitars",[9] reference Kay's drug use during the recording of The Return of the Space Cowboy: "'High Times' was admitting the truth of the matter, of where I'd been and how lucky I was to be coming out of the other side."[2] This is followed by the reggae track, "Drifting Along".[9] The tracks "Didjerema" and "Didjital Vibrations" are instrumental tracks containing ambient didgeridoo.[10][7] The title track is next on the album and samples Kay's purple Lamborghini in the intro.[11] It features a "driving groove" and after two minutes, it "transitions into a bassline-paced, heavy workout".[12] The album ends with the dance track, "You Are My Love", and the soul ballad, "Spend A Lifetime".[13][7]

Release[edit]

Travelling Without Moving was first released on 28 August 1996 in Japan,[14] then on 9 September 1996 in the United Kingdom on Sony Soho Square.[15] Released on the Work record label in January 1997,[16] it was the band's first US Billboard 200 entry,[17] where it reached number 24 and it sold 1,400,000 shipments.[18] The album peaked at number 2 in the UK chart and sold 1,219,197 copies.[19][20] In Japan, it reached number 6,[21] and in the year end charts there,[22] it ranked number 87 in 1996 and number 58 in 1997.[23] It peaked at number 2 in the French SNEP Album charts and number 6 in the year end chart in 1996.[24][25] In Switzerland, it reached number 3 in the Swiss Albums Charts,[26] and number 37 in the year end chart in 1996.[27] It ranked number 9 in the German Media Control Albums Chart,[28] and It ranked at number 69 in 1996 and number 38 in 1997 in the German year end charts.[29] In the Netherlands, in peaked at 16 in the album chart,[30] and number 48 in the year end chart in 1997.[31] In the Australian ARIA Albums chart,[32] it ranked at 6 and in 1997 47 at the end of the year.[33] The album was certified platinum in these countries,[34][35][36][37][38][39][40] except in Germany where it was certified gold.[41] It was also triple Platinum in Europe by the IFPI denoting sales of 3,000,000 copies.[42] The album overall sold 8,000,000 copies worldwide.[43] In 2013, Travelling Without Moving was one of the first three albums to be re-issued on the band's 20th anniversary campaign, also containing a bonus disc of remixes, demos, live performances and b-sides.[44][45]

A purple Lamborghini Diablo SE30, similar to the one featured in the "Cosmic Girl" music video

"Do U Know Where You're Coming From" was the first single to be released on 20 May 1996,[46] where it peaked at number 12 in the UK.[47] It is a drum and bass song by M-Beat which features vocals by Kay.[48][49] The second single "Virtual Insanity" was released on 19 August 1996,[50] reached number 3 in the single and number 1 the R&B charts in the UK.[47][51] Its Jonathan Glazer directed music video played heavily on MTV,[52] which depicted Kay "perform[ing] in a room where the floors, walls and furniture all moved simultaneously."[53] "Cosmic Girl" was released as its third single on 20 November 1996,[54] reaching number 6 in the UK and number 7 in the US Dance Club Songs charts.[47][55] Its music video features a Ferrari F355 Berlinetta, a red Ferrari F40 and a purple Lamborghini Diablo SE30 "on mountain roads and across a desert."[56] "Alright" was issued on 28 April 1997,[57] ranking number 6 in the UK and number 78 in their only Billboard Hot 100 appearance.[47][58] "High Times" was the final single, released on 1 December 1997,[59] and peaked at number 9 the US Dance Club charts.[55]

Controversy[edit]

After the album was released, Kay received backlash from the press for his interest in sports cars, because it contradicted his environmental beliefs on Emergency on Planet Earth.[60][61] The album's visual concept revolved around sports cars, with the Ferrari logo being recreated within band's Buffalo Man logo.[11] Paper magazine also pointed out this contradiction with the music video for "Alright", "when Kay rolls up in his purple Lamborghini to party on the dance floor with a bevy of bodacious babes, concerns about seals, whales, rain forests and the revolution are checked at the door."[11] He said that he was hesitant to release the album as he expected the backlash, but added "Just because I love to drive a fast car, that doesn't mean I believe in chopping trees down. It doesn't mean I think they should build more roads for my car".[62] Keyboardist Toby Smith also said "We all want to be an ecologically conscious band, but we like cars[…] We're hypocrites like the rest of the world. But then again, you can only drive one car at a time.[63]

Reception[edit]

"Even when the band seems to be playing off an existing hit, it doesn't borrow the past so much as jog the listener's memory. So when the bassline in "Alright" slips into a pattern reminiscent of the Yarbrough and Peoples oldie "Don't Stop the Music," the reference comes across less as theft than as a 'gosh, that sounds familiar' reminder."

J.D. Considine, 1997[64]

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic[65]
Encyclopedia of Popular Music[61]
Entertainment WeeklyC+[66]
The Guardian[67]
Music Week[15]
NME6/10[68]
Pitchfork7.2/10[13]
Q[69]
The Rolling Stone Album Guide[70]
Uncut6/10[45]

Critics have generally praised Travelling Without Moving for its focused and refined sound, as it deepened the acid-jazz and soul styles that were informed from their first two albums.[65][69][71] Linton Chiswick of Q magazine said that this resulted in "a fat, squishy disco feel."[69] Parry Gettelman also wrote that Kay had "evolved into quite a writer."[5] The Source also gave the album 4 out of 5: "Travelling is essentially about the metaphysics of having a good time… Jamiroquai have a thousand musical tricks up their sleeves; edgy horns laced with jazz intricacies, energetic bass lines and disco rhythms, and a wider variety of tempos than usual in British funk."[9] Tom Moon remarked that: "There are no digital samples on Traveling Without Moving. In fact, just about every sound comes from a vintage analog instrument."[72]

Stephen Thompson of The A.V. Club said that the album "sounds an awful lot like its predecessor", but concluded: "It's a tribute to Jamiroquai that more of the same still sounds pretty damned good."[73] A Music Week reviewer wrote: "Jamiroquai still wear their influences firmly on their sleeve but this is their most accomplished and satisfying offering yet."[15] Matt Diehl of Entertainment Weekly writes, "when it comes to Stevie Wonder, frontman Jason Kay still gets imitation confused with homage."[66] In a 2004 discography review by Ben Sisario, Travelling Without Moving is the only Jamiroquai album rated slightly higher than others, with Sisario singling out "Virtual Insanity" and "Cosmic Girl" for being radio-friendly, but criticising the album's use of the didgeridoo.[70] David Bennun of Muzik considered it "tepid funk" in an unfavorable review.[60] The album's lyrics have also been criticised,[8][67][68] with Matt Diehl writing they "ultimately strip away the soul."[66]

Accolades[edit]

For their single, "Virtual Insanity", the music video for it won Video of the Year and Breakthrough Video at the Video Music Awards,[74] and Alternative/Modern Rock Clip of the Year and the Maximum Vision at the Billboard Music Awards.[75] The song also earned the band a Grammy Award for Best Performance by a Duo Or Group and the album was nominated for Best Pop Vocal Album.[76][77] Travelling Without Moving has won three best album awards at the MOBO and Japan Gold Disc Awards in 1997, and at the Hungarian Music Awards in 1998.[78][79][80] Fnac listed the album in its 2008 list The 1000 Best Albums of All Time, in no order.[81] Pause & Play ranked the album at number 11 in The 90s Top 100 Essential Albums in 1999.[82] Studio Brussel included it in The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time in 2015.[81] Vibe called Travelling Without Moving "the most infectious dance record since the 70’s disco revolution", and ranked it at number 42 in its 2013 list The 50 Greatest Albums Since '93.[12]

Legacy[edit]

The high album sales of Travelling Without Moving earned the band a Guinness World Record for the best-selling funk album in history.[83] Paul Sexton of Billboard magazine credits this period of Jamiroquai as their American breakthrough: "Long a European success story for the Sony S2 label, the group once accused of being a mere Stevie Wonder soundalike has grown into its own style and added a substantial American audience in the process."[84] However, the band were unable replicate their success in America since then.[85] The music video of "Virtual Insanity" was described as "one of the most famous music videos ever", making them "icons of the music-video format", according to Spencer Kornhaber from The Atlantic.[86] The song also led to the climax of "1970s soul and funk that early acid jazz artists had initiated", according to writer Kennith Prouty.[52] The Lamborghini Diablo SE30 was also considered a "Ninties icon" in part of the "Cosmic Girl" music video, according to The Daily Telegraph.[56]

Track listing[edit]

Standard edition[a]
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Virtual Insanity"Jay Kay, Toby Smith5:40
2."Cosmic Girl"Kay, Derrick McKenzie4:03
3."Use the Force"Kay, Smith, McKenzie, Sola Akingbola4:00
4."Everyday"Kay, Smith, Stuart Zender4:28
5."Alright"Kay, Smith4:25
6."High Times"Kay, Smith, McKenzie, Zender5:58
7."Drifting Along"Kay, McKenzie, Simon Katz, Zender4:06
8."Didjerama" (Instrumental)Kay, Wallis Buchanan, McKenzie, Zender3:50
9."Didjital Vibrations" (Instrumental)Kay, Buchanan, Zender5:49
10."Travelling Without Moving"Kay3:40
11."You Are My Love"Kay3:55
12."Spend a Lifetime"Kay, Smith4:14
13."Do You Know Where You're Coming From" (featuring M-Beat, bonus track)Kay, Smith, M-Beat5:02
14."Funktion" (Hidden track)Kay, Smith, Buchanan, McKenzie, Zender, David Paich, David Foster, Cheryl Lynn 
Total length:67:07
Australian bonus disc: "Alright" Remixes EP[87]
No.TitleLength
1."Alright" (Radio Mix) 
2."Alright" (Tee's Radio Jay) 
3."Alright" (Tee's in House Mix) 
4."Alright" (DJ Version Excursion) 
5."Alright" (Tee's Digital Club) 
6."Alright" (D&C Human Mix) 
7."Alright" (D&C Electro Groove Mix) 
Australian bonus remix disc[88]
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Virtual Insanity" (Single Edit)Kay, Smith4:07
2."Virtual Insanity" (Unreality Mix)Kay, Smith3:57
3."High Times" (Sanchez Radio Edit)Kay, Smith, Zender, McKenzie, Wheeler3:53
4."Space Cowboy" (Classic Club)Kay7:51
5."Alright" (Tee's in House Mix)Kay, Smith, Harris7:20
6."Cosmic Girl" (Classic Mix)Kay, McKenzie9:23
Total length:36:29
20th anniversary reissue bonus disc[2]
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Virtual Insanity" (Salaam Remi Remix)Kay, Smith 
2."Cosmic Girl" (Quasar Mix)Kay, McKenzie 
3."Alright" (Alan Braxe and Fred Falke Remix)Kay, Smith 
4."High Times"Kay, Smith, Zender, McKenzie 
5."Do U Know Where You're Coming From"Kay, Smith, M-Beat 
6."Bullet"Kay 
7."Slipin' N' Slidin'"Kay, McKenzie 
8."Hollywood Swinging" (Live on the Chicago Riviera)Robert "Kool" Bell, Ronald Bell, George M. Brown, Robert "Spike" Mickens, Claydes Charles Smith, Dennis R. Thomas, Rick A. Westfield. 
9."Alright" (Live at the Verona Amphitheatre)Kay, Smith 
10."Virtual Insanity" (Live at the Verona Amphitheatre)Kay, Smith 
25th anniversary reissue bonus track[89]
No.TitleLength
15."Cosmic Girl" (Dimitri from Paris Remix Radio Edit)4:28
Total length:71:35

Notes[edit]

  • ^a Some editions contain either "Do U Know Where You're Coming From" or "Funktion" as a bonus track.[3][90] Others have both tracks.[91]

Personnel[edit]

Credits adapted from album liner notes.[3]

Jamiroquai

Additional musicians

Production

  • AL Stone – production, engineering
  • Blue – design and art direction
  • Lorenzo Agius – photography

Charts[edit]

Certifications and sales[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/sales
Argentina (CAPIF)[104] Platinum 60,000^
Australia (ARIA)[34] Platinum 70,000^
Austria (IFPI Austria)[105] Gold 25,000*
Belgium (BEA)[106] Platinum 50,000*
Canada (Music Canada)[107] 3× Platinum 300,000^
France (SNEP)[35] 2× Platinum 600,000*
Germany (BVMI)[41] Gold 250,000^
Italy (FIMI)[108] 2× Platinum 200,000*
Japan (RIAJ)[36] 3× Platinum 600,000^
Netherlands (NVPI)[37] Platinum 100,000^
Poland (ZPAV)[109] Gold 50,000*
Spain (PROMUSICAE)[110] Gold 50,000^
Switzerland (IFPI Switzerland)[38] Platinum 50,000^
United Kingdom (BPI)[39] 4× Platinum 1,219,197[20]
United States (RIAA)[40] Platinum 1,400,000[18]
Summaries
Europe (IFPI)[42] 3× Platinum 3,000,000*
Worldwide N/A 8,000,000[43]

* Sales figures based on certification alone.
^ Shipments figures based on certification alone.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Moon, Tom (29 May 1997). "Jamiroquai's Sunny Song has a Serious Message: The Group Warns of a High-Tech 'Virtual Insanity.'". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Archived from the original on 2 April 2021. Retrieved 24 February 2021 – via ProQuest.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Kay, Jay (2013). Travelling Without Moving (liner notes). Jamiroquai. Sony Music Entertainment. 88691967912.
  3. ^ a b c Travelling Without Moving (CD). Jamiroquai. Sony Soho Square. 1996. 483999 9.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  4. ^ "Reviews: Singles" (PDF). Music Week. 10 August 1996. p. 12. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  5. ^ a b Gettelman, Parry (7 March 1997). "Jamiroquai: [Metro Edition]". Orlando Sentinel. Archived from the original on 2 April 2021. Retrieved 22 February 2021 – via ProQuest.
  6. ^ Toussaint, Godfried T. (2013). The Geometry of Musical Rhythm: What Makes a "Good" Rhythm Good?. CRC Press. pp. 94–96. ISBN 9781466512023.
  7. ^ a b c d Sinclair, David (6 September 1996). "Travelling Without Moving". The Times. ProQuest 318632707. Archived from the original on 2 April 2021. Retrieved 2 April 2021 – via ProQuest.
  8. ^ a b Murray, Sonia (16 January 1997). "Jamiroquai's 'Travelling' jams to a soulful sway". The Atlanta Constitution. Archived from the original on 13 November 2021. Retrieved 10 September 2021 – via ProQuest.
  9. ^ a b c Wright, Kweli (February 1997). "Travelling Without Moving". The Source. p. 86.
  10. ^ Spencer, Niel (8 September 1996). "Travelling Without Moving". The Observer. Archived from the original on 2 April 2021. Retrieved 2 April 2021 – via ProQuest.
  11. ^ a b c "Stoned Groove: Jamiroquai's Jay Kay". Paper. 1 November 1997. Archived from the original on 18 January 2018. Retrieved 6 September 2018.
  12. ^ a b "The Greatest 50 Albums Since '93". Vibe. 18 April 2013. Retrieved 7 October 2021.
  13. ^ a b Schreiber, Ryan. "Jamiroquai: Travelling Without Moving". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on 2 October 2000. Retrieved 11 April 2019.
  14. ^ "#TravellingWithoutMoving was released for the first time today in Japan! #Throwback to these good ole' times touring Tokyo in September 1997". Retrieved 24 November 2021 – via Twitter.
  15. ^ a b c "Reviews: Albums" (PDF). Music Week. 31 August 1996. p. 10. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2 June 2021. Retrieved 5 September 2021.
  16. ^ Flick, Larry (1996). "'The Way It Is' changes color under Chameleon". Billboard (108(39)): 30.
  17. ^ a b "Jamiroquai Chart History: Billboard 200". Billboard. Archived from the original on 28 July 2021. Retrieved 23 September 2021.
  18. ^ a b Newman, Melinda (5 September 2005). "Jamiroquai Back with a Bang". Billboard. Archived from the original on 18 November 2021. Retrieved 29 August 2018.
  19. ^ a b "Jamiroquai | full Official Chart History". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 2 October 2021. Retrieved 23 September 2021.
  20. ^ a b Jones, Alan (7 April 2017). "Official Charts Analysis: Sheeran becomes first artist this century to top both charts for five weeks in a row". Music Week. Archived from the original on 8 April 2017. Retrieved 7 April 2017.
  21. ^ a b "Hits of the World – Japan". Billboard. 28 September 1996. p. 68. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  22. ^ a b "1996年 アルバム年間TOP100" [Oricon Year-end Albums Chart of 1996] (in Japanese). Archived from the original on 16 January 2008. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  23. ^ a b "1997年 アルバム年間TOP100" [Oricon Year-end Albums Chart of 1997] (in Japanese). Archived from the original on 11 September 2009. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  24. ^ a b "InfoDisc : Tous les Albums classés par Artiste > Choisir Un Artiste Dans la Liste" (in French). infodisc.fr. Archived from the original on 10 September 2013. Retrieved 18 December 2013.
  25. ^ a b "Les Albums (CD) de 1993 par InfoDisc" (in French). infodisc.fr. Archived from the original (PHP) on 9 February 2012. Retrieved 18 December 2013.
  26. ^ a b "Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving – hitparade.ch" (ASP). Hung Medien (in German). Swiss Music Charts. Archived from the original on 25 January 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  27. ^ a b "Hitparade.ch – Schweizer Jahreshitparade 1996" (ASP). Swiss Music Charts (in Swedish). Hung Medien. Archived from the original on 7 July 2001. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  28. ^ a b "Album Search: Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving" (in German). Media Control. Archived from the original on 18 November 2021. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  29. ^ a b "Top 100 Album-Jahrescharts" (in German). GfK Entertainment. Archived from the original on 9 May 2015. Retrieved 8 September 2016.
  30. ^ a b "dutchcharts.nl Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving" (ASP). Hung Medien. MegaCharts. Archived from the original on 3 January 2014. Retrieved 11 January 2014.
  31. ^ a b "JAAROVERZICHTEN – ALBUM 1997". Archived from the original on 12 March 2014. Retrieved 25 January 2012.
  32. ^ a b "australian-charts.com Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving" (ASP). Australian Recording Industry Association. Archived from the original on 16 January 2014. Retrieved 8 January 2014.
  33. ^ a b "ARIA Charts – End of Year Charts – Top 100 Albums 1997". aria.com.au. Australian Recording Industry Association. Archived from the original on 4 October 2011. Retrieved 12 December 2013.
  34. ^ a b "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 1997 Albums" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association.
  35. ^ a b "French album certifications – Jamiroquai – Travelling" (in French). Syndicat National de l'Édition Phonographique.
  36. ^ a b "Japanese album certifications – ジャミロクワイ – ジャミロクワイと旅に出よう" (in Japanese). Recording Industry Association of Japan. Retrieved 2 January 2014. Select 1997年2月 on the drop-down menu
  37. ^ a b "Dutch album certifications – Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving" (in Dutch). Nederlandse Vereniging van Producenten en Importeurs van beeld- en geluidsdragers. Enter Travelling Without Moving in the "Artiest of titel" box.
  38. ^ a b "The Official Swiss Charts and Music Community: Awards (Jamiroquai; 'Travelling Without Moving')". IFPI Switzerland. Hung Medien.
  39. ^ a b "British album certifications – Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving". British Phonographic Industry.
  40. ^ a b "American album certifications – Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving". Recording Industry Association of America.
  41. ^ a b "Gold-/Platin-Datenbank (Jamiroquai; 'Travelling Without')" (in German). Bundesverband Musikindustrie.
  42. ^ a b "IFPI Platinum Europe Awards – 2000". International Federation of the Phonographic Industry.
  43. ^ a b Flick, Larry (25 August 2001). "Epic's Jamiroquai Steps Into '2001'". Billboard. pp. 1. 82. Archived from the original on 15 December 2020. Retrieved 3 October 2020.
  44. ^ "Jamiroquai 20th Anniversary Reissues | The Official Sony Music Ireland Site". Sony Music Ireland. Archived from the original on 30 May 2013. Retrieved 30 August 2014.
  45. ^ a b Lewis, John (April 2013). "Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving". Uncut (191): 90.
  46. ^ "New Releases: Singles" (PDF). Music Week. 18 May 1996. p. 25. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2 June 2021. Retrieved 25 August 2021.
  47. ^ a b c d "Jamiroquai | Full Official Chart History". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 28 November 2021.
  48. ^ Kot, Greg (24 January 1997). "Jamiroquai Traveling Without Moving". Chicago Times. Archived from the original on 15 September 2021. Retrieved 15 September 2021.
  49. ^ Odell, Michael (March 1997). "Son of Soul". Vibe. pp. 101–102. Archived from the original on 15 December 2020 – via Google Books.
  50. ^ "New Releases: Singles" (PDF). Music Week. 17 August 1996. p. 35. Archived (PDF) from the original on 9 June 2021. Retrieved 25 August 2021.
  51. ^ "Official Hip Hop and R&B Singles Chart Top 40". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 28 November 2021.
  52. ^ a b Prouty, Kenneth (2011). Encyclopedia of African American Music. ABC-CLIO. p. 481. ISBN 978-0313341991 – via Google Books.
  53. ^ Scheerer, Mark (5 September 1997). "Beck, Jamiroquai big winners at MTV Music Awards – September 5, 1997". CNN. Archived from the original on 15 December 2020. Retrieved 20 January 2018.
  54. ^ "New Releases: Singles" (PDF). Music Week. 23 November 1996. p. 29. Archived (PDF) from the original on 9 July 2021. Retrieved 25 August 2021.
  55. ^ a b "Jamiroquai Chart History (Dance Club Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 28 November 2021.
  56. ^ a b "Nineties nostalgia – Jamiroquai's 'Cosmic Girl' Lamborghini Diablo on sale for £549,995". The Telegraph. Retrieved 27 November 2021 – via ProQuest.
  57. ^ "New Releases: Singles" (PDF). Music Week. 26 April 1997. p. 33. Archived (PDF) from the original on 6 November 2021. Retrieved 25 August 2021.
  58. ^ ""Jamiroquai Chart History (Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs)"". Billboard.
  59. ^ "New Releases: Singles" (PDF). Music Week. 29 November 1997. p. 35. Archived (PDF) from the original on 9 July 2021. Retrieved 25 August 2021.
  60. ^ a b Bennun, David (October 1996). "Jamiroquai: Travelling Without Moving" (PDF). Muzik (17): 130. Archived (PDF) from the original on 4 September 2020. Retrieved 6 November 2020.
  61. ^ a b Larkin, Colin (2011). The Encyclopedia of Popular Music. Omnibus Press. p. 1986. ISBN 978-0857125958 – via Google Books.
  62. ^ Poulton, Sonia (1996). "Getting personal with Jamiroquai's Jay Kay". Muzik. 17: 108 – via Wayback Machine.
  63. ^ Mehle, Michael (20 May 1997). ""Lost In America … But Maybe Eclectic English Band Jamiroquai Finally Has Country's Ear."". Rocky Mountain News: 6D.
  64. ^ J.D. Considine (16 January 1997). "Jamiroquai Travelling without Moving". The Baltimore Sun. Archived from the original on 18 November 2021. Retrieved 15 September 2021 – via ProQuest.
  65. ^ a b Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Travelling Without Moving – Jamiroquai". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 15 December 2020. Retrieved 28 August 2011.
  66. ^ a b c Diehl, Matt (14 February 1997). "Travelling Without Moving". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on 18 April 2015. Retrieved 28 August 2011.
  67. ^ a b Sullivan, Caroline (13 September 1996). "Jamiroquai: Travelling Without Moving (Sony)". The Guardian.
  68. ^ a b Kessler, Ted (14 September 1996). "Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving". NME. Archived from the original on 11 October 2000. Retrieved 11 April 2019.
  69. ^ a b c Chiswick, Linton (October 1996). "Jamiroquai: Travelling Without Moving". Q (121): 164.
  70. ^ a b Sisario, Ben (2004). "Jamiroquai". In Brackett, Nathan; Hoard, Christian (eds.). The New Rolling Stone Album Guide (4th ed.). Simon & Schuster. p. 420. ISBN 0-7432-0169-8.
  71. ^ Hicklin, Aaron. "He sells millions of records, has a famously gorgeous girlfriend, a Georgian manor and more fast cars than he could drive. So what, wonders Aaron Hicklin, makes Jamiroquai's singer think everyone is out to get him?". Sunday Herald. Archived from the original on 18 November 2021. Retrieved 14 September 2021.
  72. ^ Moon, Tom (29 May 1997). "Jamiroquai's Sunny Song has a Serious Message: The Group Warns of a High-Tech 'Virtual Insanity.'". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Archived from the original on 2 April 2021. Retrieved 23 February 2021 – via ProQuest.
  73. ^ Thompson, Stephen (29 March 2002). "Jamiroquai: Travelling Without Moving". The A.V. Club. Archived from the original on 24 November 2019. Retrieved 30 March 2021.
  74. ^ "VMA 1997". MTV. Archived from the original on 13 July 2016. Retrieved 26 April 2020.
  75. ^ Reece, Doug (6 December 1997). "Jamiroquai Takes U.S. with Traveling". Billboard. p. 44. Archived from the original on 15 December 2020. Retrieved 26 October 2020 – via Google Books.
  76. ^ Considine, J.D. (26 February 1998). "Odd Spins; Grammys: Upsets are sprinkled through the Grammy Awards, but Dylan and other veterans get their due.: [Final Edition]". The Baltimore Sun. ProQuest 407010278. Retrieved 18 November 2021.
  77. ^ "Complete list of Grammy nominations". USA Today. 5 March 1999. Archived from the original on 10 February 1999. Retrieved 29 November 2021.
  78. ^ "1997: Mary J. Blige, Eternal, Simply Red and The Prodigy". MOBO Awards. Archived from the original on 20 January 2018. Retrieved 20 January 2018.
  79. ^ "Nyertesek 1998". Hungarian Music Awards (in Hungarian). 12 August 2016. Archived from the original on 10 December 2018. Retrieved 10 December 2018.
  80. ^ "第11回日本ゴールドディスク大賞 / Gold Disc Hall of Fame 11th". Japan Gold Disc Awards (in Japanese). 1997. Archived from the original on 16 February 2017. Retrieved 10 December 2018.
  81. ^ a b "Travelling Without Moving". Acclaimed Music. Retrieved 7 October 2021.
  82. ^ "Albums | Pause & Play CD and Music Site". Pause & Play. Retrieved 7 October 2021.
  83. ^ "Best-selling album of funk music". Guinness World Records. Retrieved 4 July 2021.
  84. ^ Paul, Sexton (6 June 1998). "Rhythm & Brits". Billboard. Vol. 110, no. 23. p. 42. ProQuest 227138894. Archived from the original on 18 November 2021. Retrieved 10 November 2021.
  85. ^ Adams, Cameron (17 January 2002). "Virtual insanity of my career". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 13 November 2021 – via ProQuest.
  86. ^ Kornhaber, Spencer (27 January 2017). "Escape to the Future With Missy Elliott and Jamiroquai's New Videos". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on 15 December 2020. Retrieved 11 May 2018.
  87. ^ Travelling Without Moving (CD). Jamiroquai. Sony Soho Square. 1997. 483999 0.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  88. ^ Travelling Without Moving (CD). Jamiroquai. Sony Soho Square. 1997. 483999 5.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  89. ^ "Travelling Without Moving: 25th Anniversary Yellow Vinyl".
  90. ^ Travelling Without Moving (liner notes). Jamiroquai. Work. 1996. OK 679031.{{cite AV media}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  91. ^ Travelling Without Moving (liner notes). Jamiroquai. Sony Soho Square. 1996. 483999-11.{{cite AV media}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  92. ^ "austriancharts.at Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving" (ASP). Hung Medien (in German). Archived from the original on 26 January 2014. Retrieved 7 January 2014.
  93. ^ "ultratop.be Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving" (ASP). Hung Medien (in Dutch). Ultratop. Archived from the original on 19 September 2011. Retrieved 18 December 2013.
  94. ^ "ultratop.be Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving" (ASP). Hung Medien (in French). Ultratop. Archived from the original on 7 July 2010. Retrieved 18 December 2013.
  95. ^ "Top Albums/CDs – Volume 65, No. 4, March 31, 1997". RPM. Archived from the original on 16 January 2014. Retrieved 27 February 2012.
  96. ^ "finnishcharts.com Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving" (ASP). Archived from the original on 11 November 2012. Retrieved 2 February 2010.
  97. ^ "charts.nz Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving" (ASP). Hung Medien. Recording Industry Association of New Zealand. Archived from the original on 13 March 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  98. ^ "norwegiancharts.com Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving" (ASP). Archived from the original on 16 January 2014. Retrieved 18 December 2013.
  99. ^ "Oficjalna lista sprzedaży :: OLiS - Official Retail Sales Chart". OLiS. Polish Society of the Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 3 February 2022.
  100. ^ "swedishcharts.com Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving" (ASP) (in Swedish). Archived from the original on 16 January 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  101. ^ "Top 100 Album-Jahrescharts" (in German). GfK Entertainment. Archived from the original on 9 May 2015. Retrieved 8 September 2016.
  102. ^ "Rapports annuels 1997". Ultratop (in French). Hung Medien. Archived from the original on 17 April 2008. Retrieved 25 January 2012.
  103. ^ "Billboard.BIZ – Year-end Charts – Billboard 200 – 1996". Billboard. Archived from the original on 8 October 2012. Retrieved 18 September 2011.
  104. ^ "Discos de oro y platino" (in Spanish). Cámara Argentina de Productores de Fonogramas y Videogramas. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 24 April 2018.
  105. ^ "Austrian album certifications – Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving" (in German). IFPI Austria.
  106. ^ "Ultratop − Goud en Platina – albums 1997". Ultratop. Hung Medien.
  107. ^ "Canadian album certifications – Jamiroquai – Travelling Without Moving". Music Canada.
  108. ^ "Italia 1: Jamiroquai" (in Italian). 22 February 1997. Archived from the original on 27 November 2020. Retrieved 10 July 2012.
  109. ^ "Wyróżnienia – Złote płyty CD - Archiwum - Przyznane w 1998 roku" (in Polish). Polish Society of the Phonographic Industry.
  110. ^ Solo Exitos 1959–2002 Ano A Ano: Certificados > 1995–1999. Iberautor Promociones Culturales. 2005. ISBN 84-8048-639-2. Archived from the original on 27 December 2013. Retrieved 16 January 2014.

External links[edit]