Treehouse of Horror XVI

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"Treehouse of Horror XVI"
The Simpsons episode
The episode's promotional image
Promotional image for the episode.
Episode no. 360
Directed by David Silverman
Written by Marc Wilmore
Showrunner(s) Al Jean
Production code GABF17
Original air date November 6, 2005
Commentary
Guest appearance(s)

Terry Bradshaw as himself
Dennis Rodman as himself

Seasons

"Treehouse of Horror XVI" is the fourth episode of the seventeenth season of The Simpsons. It first aired on the Fox network in the United States on November 6, 2005. In the sixteenth annual Treehouse of Horror, the Simpsons replace Bart with a robot son after Bart falls into a coma, Homer and various other male characters find themselves on a reality show where Mr. Burns hunts humans for sport, and costumed Springfieldians become whatever they are wearing, thanks to a witch who was disqualified from a Halloween costume contest. It was written by Marc Wilmore and directed by David Silverman. Terry Bradshaw and Dennis Rodman guest star as themselves. Around 11.63 million Americans tuned in to watch the episode during its original broadcast.

Plot[edit]

In the opening, Kang hopes to speed up an exceedingly slow and boring baseball game, but ends up destroying the universe when the baseball players go so fast, they turn into a killer vortex which sucks up the universe, even God. When everything was sucked up by the baseball players, Kang places a post-it note revealing the title of the episode.

B.I. Bartificial Intelligence[edit]

In a parody of A.I. Artificial Intelligence, Bart winds up in a two-week coma after attempting to jump out of a window into a swimming pool. The family takes in a robotic boy, named David, who quickly proves to be a better son. Bart wakes up from his two-week coma and competes against David for the affection of the rest of his family. However, Bart is dumped on a road by Homer, who decided with Marge to keep David as their son. When Bart finds a group of old rusty robots, he steals their parts and becomes a devil-possesed cyborg. He returns home, saws David in half with a chainsaw, but does the same to Homer. Although the family is now together again, Homer is angry that he has to be fused with David's lower half. Suddenly, the whole scenario is revealed to be a dream conjured by Homer's demonically possessed mind as he is being exorcised.

Survival of the Fattest[edit]

In a parody of The Most Dangerous Game, men and women from Springfield arrive at Mr. Burns' mansion to go hunting. Unbeknownst to them, they are the prey to be hunted and broadcast on television. Homer manages with his wife Marge to survive the night while the others are killed left and right, but Burns closes in on him in the morning. Just as the couple is about to be shot, Burns and Smithers are knocked up and smashed out with pebbles-throwing slingshots by Bart and his best friend Milhouse.

I've Grown a Costume on Your Face[edit]

In a parody of Halloweentown II: Kalabar's Revenge, the Buffy the Vampire Slayer episode "Halloween" and the classic Twilight Zone episode "The Masks", The citizens of Springfield dress in their Halloween costumes for a costume contest that involves courage, bravery and happiness. The winner is declared to be a strange old witch with a green skin and a black-and-red suit. When given the award and asked who she is, she is forced to admit that she is a really real witch. As a result, her reward is rescinded because she is not in actual costume and is setenced to four weeks in jail as a punishment for admitting a secret silliness. In anger of such harsh punishment, she turns everyone into their costumed characters, just before being put into custody. The only person who can reverse the spell is Maggie, who was costumed as a witch. Gold, Maggie turns them all into pacifiers with their normal heads instead, flying off on a broom to seek help after this mistake she made. The segment ends as Moe and a transformed Dennis Rodman talk to the audience about the importance of reading.

Reception[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]