Treeing Cur

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Treeing Cur
Origin United States
Traits
Weight 30 to 60 pounds (14 to 27 kg)
Height 18 to 24 inches (46 to 61 cm)
Coat Double coat with short- to medium-length, smooth or rough outer coat and short, soft, dense undercoat. Coat should be short and close.
Color Any color, color pattern, or combination of colors acceptable.
Life span 8-12 years.
Classification / standards
UKC Scenthound standard
Domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris)

The Treeing Cur is a breed of dog that originated in the mid-west and was first recognized by United Kennel Club on November 1, 1998, due to the efforts of Alex and Ray Kovac. "Most Cur breeders were not well off and so they required a dog that could serve multiple purposes: hunter, guardian, and stock dog. The result was the Treeing Cur, which is the most varied in size and colors of the Cur breeds", according to United Kennel Club.They are primarily used to tree squirrels, raccoons, opossum, wild boar, bears, mountain lion, bobcat as well as to hunt big game.[1]

Description[edit]

Treeing curs have no restrictions on color or markings like other registered coonhounds and scenthounds this allows breeders to breed for ability and not be restricted by color standards. There is also no proven link between color or markings to hunting or working ability.

Appearance[edit]

Treeing curs are medium-sized dogs known for their speed and agility in rough terrain. Their build is athletic and without major conformational faults. Their build and size can range greatly, because of the nature of the registration requirements of the treeing cur according to United Kennel Club "Most Cur breeders were not well off and so they required a dog that could serve multiple purposes: hunter, guardian, and stock dog. The result was the Treeing Cur, which is the most varied in size and colors of the Cur breeds." They are known for having a tail that is occasionally naturally bobbed but mostly artificially docked, Long tails are also acceptable. The ears should be natural and floppy, not erect. The dog should have a smooth athletic gait. The coat should be dense and close, and all colors except albinos are acceptable. The dog is built for stamina and should look like a working dog - in the United Kennel Club standard, scars are not penalized, nor used as a mark of a dog's working ability.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "United Kennel Club - Treeing Cur". United Kennel Club. Retrieved 16 January 2013. 

External links[edit]