Trenton Doyle Hancock

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Trenton Doyle Hancock
Born 1974 (1974)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Nationality  United States
Education Texas A&M University-Commerce, Temple University

Trenton Doyle Hancock is an American artist. He was born in 1974 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and grew up in Paris, Texas.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

Hancock received a BFA from Texas A&M University-Commerce, and an MFA from the Tyler School of Art at Temple University, Philadelphia.[2]

Work[edit]

Hancock makes prints, videos, drawings, sculptures, individual performances, and collaged felt paintings.[3] His influences include comics, graphic novels, cartoons, music, and film.[4]

The characters which populate his imaginary worlds include the Mounds, half-animal, half-plant creatures, which are preyed upon by evil beings called vegans.[5] An alter ego and recurring character that he created as a child, the unheroic super hero Torpedo Boy,[6] appears in his work alongside Junior Mound, Bringback, Baby Curt, and Shy Jerry.[7] In 2013 his work was translated to Cult of Color: Call to Color,[8] a ballet created in collaboration with Ballet Austin's Artistic Director Stephen Mills.[9]

Awards and fellowships[edit]

Among the honors which Hancock has earned are an Artadia Award (2003)[10] and The Greenfield Prize at the Hermitage Artist Retreat (2013), a two year residency and commission of original work.[11]

Selected exhibitions[edit]

Trenton Doyle Hancock's work has been featured in exhibitions at numerous galleries and institutions including:[12]

Hancock was included in the American Folk Art Museum's "Dargerism" exhibit, showing the influence of Henry Darger on contemporary artists.

He is represented in New York by James Cohan Gallery and was featured in PBS' Art:21.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Trenton Doyle Hancock biography. Retrieved 2011-02-12.
  2. ^ "Trenton Doyle Hancock: Skin and Bones, 20 Years of Drawing | Contemporary Arts Museum Houston". camh.org. Retrieved 2016-03-17. 
  3. ^ exhibit-e.com. "BalletAustin presents Trenton Doyle Hancock's Cult of Color: Call to Color - News - James Cohan Gallery". www.jamescohan.com. Retrieved 2016-03-17. 
  4. ^ "Trenton Doyle Hancock: Skin and Bones, 20 Years of Drawing | Contemporary Arts Museum Houston". camh.org. Retrieved 2016-03-17. 
  5. ^ "Trenton Doyle Hancock". ART21, Inc. Retrieved 20 February 2016. 
  6. ^ "Hampton Roads.com: All the events happening in Hampton Roads under one site.". HamptonRoads.com. Retrieved 2016-03-17. 
  7. ^ "Review: Trenton Doyle Hancock's wild world on display at Ringling". Tampa Bay Times. Retrieved 2016-03-17. 
  8. ^ "Interview with Trenton Doyle Hancock: "Cult of Color" – Glasstire". Retrieved 2016-03-17. 
  9. ^ exhibit-e.com. "BalletAustin presents Trenton Doyle Hancock's Cult of Color: Call to Color - News - James Cohan Gallery". www.jamescohan.com. Retrieved 2016-03-17. 
  10. ^ "Awards / Past Awardees". Artadia. Retrieved 20 February 2016. 
  11. ^ "Greenfield Winners". Greenfield Prize. Retrieved 11 April 2016. 
  12. ^ "Trenton Doyle Hancock: Biography". Artnet Worldwide Corporation. Retrieved 20 February 2016. 
  13. ^ "Hampton Roads.com: All the events happening in Hampton Roads under one site.". HamptonRoads.com. Retrieved 2016-03-17. 
  14. ^ "Powerful Babies: Keith Haring’s Impact on Artists Today" (PDF). SPRITMUSEUM. Retrieved 2016-03-16. 
  15. ^ "Trenton Doyle Hancock: Skin and Bones, 20 Years of Drawing | Contemporary Arts Museum Houston". camh.org. Retrieved 2016-03-17. 
  16. ^ "Trenton Doyle Hancock, EMIT: What the Bringback Brought.". ringling.org. Retrieved 2016-04-11. 

External links[edit]