Triethylindium

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Triethylindium
Triethylindium 200.svg
Names
IUPAC name
Triethylindium
Other names
Indium triethyl, triethylindigane, indiumtriethyl, TEI, TEIn
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.011.905 Edit this at Wikidata
  • InChI=1S/3C2H5.In/c3*1-2;/h3*1H2,2H3;
    Key: OTRPZROOJRIMKW-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • CC[In](CC)CC
Properties
C6H15In
Molar mass 202.004 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid
Boiling point 144 °C (291 °F; 417 K)
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS02: Flammable GHS05: Corrosive
Danger
H250, H314
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Triethylindium is an organometallic compound. Its chemical formula is C
6
H
15
In
.[1][2]

Synthesis[edit]

This compound can be obtained by reacting indium(III) chloride with a diethyl ether solution of ethyl magnesium chloride:

InCl
3
+ 3 C
2
H
5
MgCl
→ In(C2H5)3 + 3 MgCl
2

Other routes are also known.[3]

Properties[edit]

Indium triethyl is a colorless, toxic, oxidation and hydrolysis-sensitive liquid. It is a monomer in the gaseous and dissolved state. The compound reacts with halomethanes to form diethyl indium halides.[4]

Triethylindium is highly reactive with water:

In(C2H5)3 + H
2
O
→ In(C2H5)2OH + C
2
H
6

Applications[edit]

Indium triethyl is used to prepare indium phosphide layers for microelectronics.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "INDIUM TRIETHYL". chemicalbook.com. Retrieved 7 June 2017.
  2. ^ "Substance Name: Indium, triethyl". chem.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 7 June 2017.
  3. ^ Foster, Douglas F.; Cole-Hamilton, David J. (1997). "Electronic Grade Alkyls of Group 12 and 13 Elements". Inorganic Syntheses. 31: 29 66. doi:10.1002/9780470132623.ch7.
  4. ^ Maeda, Takayoshi; Tada, Hisashi; Yasuda, Kiyoshi; Okawara, Rokuro (11 September 1970). "Reactions of triethylindium with halomethanes: preparations and properties of diethylindium halides". Journal of Organometallic Chemistry. 27 (1): 13–18. doi:10.1016/S0022-328X(00)82987-3.
  5. ^ Sakaki, H.; Woo, J.C.; Yokoyama, N.; Harayama, Y. (1999). Compound Semiconductors: Proceedings of the Twenty-Fifth International Symposium on Compound Semiconductors held in Nara, Japan, 12-16 October 1998. CRC Press. p. 529. ISBN 978-0750306119.