Trillium maculatum

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Trillium maculatum
160228 trillium maculatum.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Order: Liliales
Family: Melanthiaceae
Genus: Trillium
Species:
T. maculatum
Binomial name
Trillium maculatum
Synonyms[1]
  • Trillium maculatum f. luteum J.D.Freeman
  • Trillium maculatum f. simulans J.D.Freeman

Trillium maculatum, the spotted wakerobin[2] or spotted trillium, is a species of flowering plant in the family Melanthiaceae. It is found only in the eastern United States (Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina and northern Florida).[3][4][5]

Trillium maculatum is called "spotted" because of irregular dark splotches on the leaves and stems. It is a perennial herbaceous plant that flowers early February to early April.[6] The flower petals are deep red or reddish-purple but occasionally yellow.[7]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Case, Frederick W.; Case, Roberta B. (1997). Trilliums. Portland, Oregon: Timber Press. ISBN 978-0-88192-374-2.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Trillium maculatum". World Checklist of Selected Plant Families (WCSP). Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 9 October 2019.
  2. ^ "Trillium maculatum". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 15 December 2015.
  3. ^ Rafinesque, Constantine Samuel 1830. Medical Flora 2: 103
  4. ^ Freeman, J. D. 1975. Revision of Trillium subgenus Phyllantherum (Liliaceae). Brittonia 27: 1–62.
  5. ^ "Trillium maculatum". County-level distribution map from the North American Plant Atlas (NAPA). Biota of North America Program (BONAP). 2014. Retrieved 9 October 2019.
  6. ^ Stritch, Larry. "Spotted Trillium (Trillium maculatum)". United States Forest Service. Retrieved 7 October 2019.
  7. ^ Case Jr., Frederick W. (2002). "Trillium maculatum". In Flora of North America Editorial Committee (ed.). Flora of North America North of Mexico (FNA). 26. New York and Oxford – via eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.

External links[edit]