Trinity High School, Rutherglen

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Trinity High School
Trinity high schools logo Scotland.jpg
Address


Information
TypeRoman Catholic
Motto"Home, school, church, stronger together"
EstablishedCirca 1970
HeadmasterPeter Bollen[1]
Scottish Highers1st Years – 6th Years
GenderMixed
Enrollment1,060
Colour(s)                   
Website

Trinity High School is a Roman Catholic secondary school, currently, located in Eastfield, Rutherglen, Scotland near the city of Glasgow. It was established in 1971. The current Head Teacher is Peter Bollen who took office between 2007 and 2008 with incumbent Patricia Rossi leaving her post.

Overview[edit]

The school uses a traditional house system. The pupils are organised into one of three guidance houses, formerly having been four. The three houses are Iona, Dunkeld and Melrose. Jedburgh was previously a house but was removed during re-organisation of the school faculty.

In 2007 the old Trinity was demolished; a new school was completed in the same Glenside Drive location. Pupils returned in August 2009.[2] A council-run sports centre and swimming pool (known as South Lanarkshire Lifestyle Eastfield)[3] constructed a few years earlier shares the site, with the facilities used by the Trinity pupils during the school day and available for community use at other times.

The school hosts many afterschool clubs and has competed in national competitions. Around mid-October an awards ceremony is held to honour pupils who have achieved academically and through sports activities. Although a Catholic school, it accepts students from other religious denominations.

Trinity's affiliated primary schools include St Anthony's in Springhall, St Bride's in Cambuslang, St Cadoc's in Halfway, St Charles' in Newton, St Columbkille's in Rutherglen, St Joachim's in Carmyle, and St Mark's in Blairbeth.[4]

Gallery[edit]

History[edit]

New buildings, move to Hamilton[edit]

On 5 November 2007 the former school building in Glenside Drive, being demolished as part of the "Schools Modernisation Programme",[5][6][7] was set ablaze. Before it was set on fire, it was due to be destroyed by contractors InspirdED onto whom the council had passed responsibility.[6][8]

The fire broke out in the school on Guy Fawkes Night. A total of eight crews, 60 firefighters in total, worked through the night to control the blaze and by 1:00 AM on Monday morning the fire was finally extinguished. On Bonfire night there were several incidents throughout Scotland in the aftermath of the festival that sparked fires similar to the Trinity School blaze as evidenced by the Strathclyde Fire and Police services, and in addition this gained widespread media attention.[6][8]

During the complete reconstruction of the school, pupils at Trinity High School were temporarily located at the old Holy Cross High School buildings in Hamilton, with a replacement for Holy Cross having already been completed nearby (these have also since been demolished in the South Lanarkshire Schools Modernisation project).

Former pupils[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Senior Leadership Team". Trinity High School. Retrieved 11 February 2018.
  2. ^ Smith, Kenny (7 August 2010). "New Trinity High is officially opened". Daily Record / Rutherglen Reformer. Retrieved 11 February 2018.
  3. ^ "SLC – Eastfield Lifestyle". South Lanarkshire Leisure & Culture. Retrieved 11 February 2018.
  4. ^ "Primary Schools". Trinity High School. Retrieved 11 February 2018.
  5. ^ "Scotland's Largest Schools PFI" (PDF). Marc Roca. Archived from the original (PDF) on 13 July 2011. Retrieved 30 January 2009.
  6. ^ a b c "BONFIRE NIGHT BLAZE DESTROYS TRINITY SCHOOL". Douglas Dickie. The Rutherglen Reformer. 8 November 2007. Archived from the original on 21 April 2013. Retrieved 29 January 2009.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  7. ^ "South Lanarkshire Schools PPP Programme". Architecture + Design Scotland, ads.org.uk. 24 May 2005. Retrieved 29 January 2009.[permanent dead link]
  8. ^ a b "Crews record busy Bonfire Night". BBC News. 6 November 2007. Retrieved 29 January 2009.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 55°49′24″N 4°11′16″W / 55.82341°N 4.187894°W / 55.82341; -4.187894