Triple Crown (snooker)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

A Triple Crown in snooker is the name given both to the three most prestigious tournaments; the World Championship, the UK Championship and the Masters and the act of winning all of these events.[1] These three tournaments are the Triple Crown events, sometimes also called snooker's majors,[1][2] the big three BBC events,[3][4] or simply the big three.[5][6] These tournaments are deemed to be the most prestigious, despite not always being worth the most ranking points or prize fund.[7] Players who win all three events are said to have "won the triple crown", either over their career, or in one season alone.[8]

History[edit]

Triple Crown events have been retrospectively given to events from 1969, when the World Snooker Championship returned to being a single elimination tournament, rather than the challenge format that had been used prior. Championships held after this date are considered part of the "modern era" of professional snooker.[9] Six years later, a non-ranking invitational event; the Masters was introduced. The inaugural event, the 1975 Masters saw 10 players compete; and would later be increased to 16 players.[10] John Spencer won the event, and became the first person to win two of the Triple Crown events, having won the world championships in 1969 and 1971.[11] The following year, Ray Reardon won both the Masters and World Championships in the same season.[12][13]

In 1977, a third Triple Crown event was created, the UK Championship. Originally restricted to British residents and passport holders, it was opened up to all professionals and became a ranking event in 1984.[14][15][16] Patsy Fagan won the 1977 event, in his only Triple Crown final.[16] In the 1980/81 season, Steve Davis won both the 1980 UK Championship, and the 1981 World Snooker Championship, and would be the first to complete the career triple crown by winning the 1982 Masters the following season.[17][18] Davis would also become the first player to complete the season triple crown, winning all three events in the 1987/88 season.[19]

The Triple Crown events are sometimes referred to as the "big three BBC events", due to them having been broadcast by the British Broadcasting Corporation since inception.[20][21]

Triple Crown title winners[edit]

Ronnie O'Sullivan has won 19 major (Triple Crown) titles—the most by any player in history—including a record seven UK titles and a record seven Masters titles

Eleven players have completed a career Triple Crown, having won each of the Triple Crown events at least once. These players are Steve Davis, Terry Griffiths, Alex Higgins, Stephen Hendry, John Higgins, Mark Williams, Ronnie O'Sullivan, Neil Robertson, Mark Selby, Shaun Murphy, and Judd Trump.[22][23] Only Davis, Hendry and Williams have won all three Triple Crown events in the same season, and Hendry is the only player to achieve this feat twice, in the 1989/1990 and 1995/1996 seasons.[24][25]

After winning the 1999 Masters, John Higgins held all three Triple Crown titles at the same time but spanned two seasons. Only O'Sullivan and Hendry have managed to successfully defend all three Triple Crown events. In 2013 Australian Neil Robertson became the first player from outside the United Kingdom to complete the career Triple Crown.[26] Following his win in the 2018 UK Championship, O'Sullivan took the record for the most wins in Triple Crown events, with 19, passing Hendry's previous record of 18.[27] Trump is the most recent player to have achieved a career Triple Crown, winning the Masters and World Championship in 2018-19, which also made him the first player to have won their maiden Masters and World Title (Trump had previously won the 2011 UK Championship) in the same season.

One Win Away From Triple Crown[edit]

Of those still active on the tour as of 2019, four players have won two of the three Triple Crown events, leaving them one away from completing the set. Jimmy White, Matthew Stevens and Ding Junhui all need to win the World Championships having won The Masters and UK Championships. The three have lost nine World Finals between them, six by White. White has not appeared at The Crucible since 2006. Peter Ebdon needs to win The Masters to add to his World and UK Championships and complete the Triple Crown. As of 2019, though, he has not qualified for the London event since 2011. John Parrott won both the UK and World Titles in his career, before retiring, but never managed to win the Masters. Parrott reached three Masters finals in four years between 1989 and 1992 but was defeated by Hendry on each occasion.

Triple Crown event winners by season[edit]

A list of all winners of the three Triple Crown events is shown below by season:

Season UK Championship[28][29] The Masters[30][31] World Championship[32][33] Ref
1968/1969 started in 1977/1978 started in 1974/1975 England John Spencer (1/4) [34]
1969/1970 Wales Ray Reardon (1/7) [34]
1970/1971 England John Spencer (2/4) [34]
1971/1972 Northern Ireland Alex Higgins (1/5) [34]
1972/1973 Wales Ray Reardon (2/7) [34]
1973/1974 Wales Ray Reardon (3/7) [34]
1974/1975 England John Spencer (3/4) Wales Ray Reardon (4/7) [35][34]
1975/1976 Wales Ray Reardon (5/7) Wales Ray Reardon (6/7) [35][34]
1976/1977 Wales Doug Mountjoy (1/3) England John Spencer (4/4) [35][34]
1977/1978 Republic of Ireland Patsy Fagan Northern Ireland Alex Higgins (2/5) Wales Ray Reardon (7/7) [35][34]
1978/1979 Wales Doug Mountjoy (2/3) South Africa Perrie Mans Wales Terry Griffiths (1/3) [35][34]
1979/1980 England John Virgo Wales Terry Griffiths (2/3) Canada Cliff Thorburn (1/4) [36][35][34]
1980/1981 England Steve Davis (1/15) Northern Ireland Alex Higgins (3/5) England Steve Davis (2/15) [36][35][34]
1981/1982 England Steve Davis (3/15) England Steve Davis (4/15) Northern Ireland Alex Higgins (4/5) [36][35][34]
1982/1983 Wales Terry Griffiths (3/3) Canada Cliff Thorburn (2/4) England Steve Davis (5/15) [36][35][34]
1983/1984 Northern Ireland Alex Higgins (5/5) England Jimmy White (1/2) England Steve Davis (6/15) [36][35][34]
1984/1985 England Steve Davis (7/15) Canada Cliff Thorburn (3/4) Northern Ireland Dennis Taylor (1/2) [36][35][34]
1985/1986 England Steve Davis (8/15) Canada Cliff Thorburn (4/4) England Joe Johnson [36][35][34]
1986/1987 England Steve Davis (9/15) Northern Ireland Dennis Taylor (2/2) England Steve Davis (10/15) [36][35][34]
1987/1988 England Steve Davis (11/15) England Steve Davis (12/15) England Steve Davis (13/15) [36][35][34]
1988/1989 Wales Doug Mountjoy (3/3) Scotland Stephen Hendry (1/18) England Steve Davis (14/15) [36][35][34]
1989/1990 Scotland Stephen Hendry (2/18) Scotland Stephen Hendry (3/18) Scotland Stephen Hendry (4/18) [36][35][34]
1990/1991 Scotland Stephen Hendry (5/18) Scotland Stephen Hendry (6/18) England John Parrott (1/2) [36][35][34]
1991/1992 England John Parrott (2/2) Scotland Stephen Hendry (7/18) Scotland Stephen Hendry (8/18) [36][35][34]
1992/1993 England Jimmy White (2/2) Scotland Stephen Hendry (9/18) Scotland Stephen Hendry (10/18) [36][35][34]
1993/1994 England Ronnie O'Sullivan (1/19) Scotland Alan McManus Scotland Stephen Hendry (11/18) [36][35][34]
1994/1995 Scotland Stephen Hendry (12/18) England Ronnie O'Sullivan (2/19) Scotland Stephen Hendry (13/18) [36][35][34]
1995/1996 Scotland Stephen Hendry (14/18) Scotland Stephen Hendry (15/18) Scotland Stephen Hendry (16/18) [36][35][34]
1996/1997 Scotland Stephen Hendry (17/18) England Steve Davis (15/15) Republic of Ireland Ken Doherty [36][35][34]
1997/1998 England Ronnie O'Sullivan (3/19) Wales Mark Williams (1/7) Scotland John Higgins (1/9) [36][35][34]
1998/1999 Scotland John Higgins (2/9) Scotland John Higgins (3/9) Scotland Stephen Hendry (18/18) [36][35][34]
1999/2000 Wales Mark Williams (2/7) Wales Matthew Stevens (1/2) Wales Mark Williams (3/7) [36][35][34]
2000/2001 Scotland John Higgins (4/9) England Paul Hunter (1/3) England Ronnie O'Sullivan (4/19) [36][35][34]
2001/2002 England Ronnie O'Sullivan (5/19) England Paul Hunter (2/3) England Peter Ebdon (1/2) [36][35][34]
2002/2003 Wales Mark Williams (4/7) Wales Mark Williams (5/7) Wales Mark Williams (6/7) [36][35][34]
2003/2004 Wales Matthew Stevens (2/2) England Paul Hunter (3/3) England Ronnie O'Sullivan (6/19) [36][35][34]
2004/2005 Scotland Stephen Maguire England Ronnie O'Sullivan (7/19) England Shaun Murphy (1/3) [36][35][34]
2005/2006 China Ding Junhui (1/3) Scotland John Higgins (5/9) Scotland Graeme Dott [36][35][34]
2006/2007 England Peter Ebdon (2/2) England Ronnie O'Sullivan (8/19) Scotland John Higgins (6/9) [36][35][34]
2007/2008 England Ronnie O'Sullivan (9/19) England Mark Selby (1/8) England Ronnie O'Sullivan (10/19) [36][35][34]
2008/2009 England Shaun Murphy (2/3) England Ronnie O'Sullivan (11/19) Scotland John Higgins (7/9) [36][35][34]
2009/2010 China Ding Junhui (2/3) England Mark Selby (2/8) Australia Neil Robertson (1/4) [36][35][34]
2010/2011 Scotland John Higgins (8/9) China Ding Junhui (3/3) Scotland John Higgins (9/9) [36][35][34]
2011/2012 England Judd Trump (1/3) Australia Neil Robertson (2/4) England Ronnie O'Sullivan (12/19) [37][38][39]
2012/2013 England Mark Selby (3/8) England Mark Selby (4/8) England Ronnie O'Sullivan (13/19) [40][41][42]
2013/2014 Australia Neil Robertson (3/4) England Ronnie O'Sullivan (14/19) England Mark Selby (5/8) [43][44][45]
2014/2015 England Ronnie O'Sullivan (15/19) England Shaun Murphy (3/3) England Stuart Bingham [46][47][48]
2015/2016 Australia Neil Robertson (4/4) England Ronnie O'Sullivan (16/19) England Mark Selby (6/8) [49][50][51]
2016/2017 England Mark Selby (7/8) England Ronnie O'Sullivan (17/19) England Mark Selby (8/8) [52][53][54]
2017/2018 England Ronnie O'Sullivan (18/19) Northern Ireland Mark Allen Wales Mark Williams (7/7) [55][56][57]
2018/2019 England Ronnie O'Sullivan (19/19) England Judd Trump (2/3) England Judd Trump (3/3) [58][59][60]
Season UK Championship The Masters World Championship Ref
Legend
Player won all three Triple Crown tournaments in the same season
Player won two Triple Crown tournaments in the same season

Multiple Triple Crown event winners[edit]

Player Total World Champ.[34] UK Champ.[36] The Masters[35] Winning span
England Ronnie O'Sullivan 19 5 7 7 1993–2018
Scotland Stephen Hendry 18 7 5 6 1989–1999
England Steve Davis 15 6 6 3 1980–1997
Scotland John Higgins 9 4 3 2 1998–2011
England Mark Selby 8 3 2 3 2008–2017
Wales Ray Reardon 7 6 0 1 1970–1978
Wales Mark Williams 7 3 2 2 1998–2018
Northern Ireland Alex Higgins 5 2 1 2 1972–1983
England John Spencer 4 3 0 1 1969–1977
Australia Neil Robertson 4 1 2 1 2010–2015
Canada Cliff Thorburn 4 1 0 3 1980–1986
Wales Terry Griffiths 3 1 1 1 1979–1982
England Shaun Murphy 3 1 1 1 2005–2015
England Judd Trump 3 1 1 1 2011–2019
Wales Doug Mountjoy 3 0 2 1 1977–1988
China Ding Junhui 3 0 2 1 2005–2011
England Paul Hunter 3 0 0 3 2001–2004
England John Parrott 2 1 1 0 1991–1991
England Peter Ebdon 2 1 1 0 2002–2006
Northern Ireland Dennis Taylor 2 1 0 1 1985–1987
England Jimmy White 2 0 1 1 1984–1992
Wales Matthew Stevens 2 0 1 1 2000–2003
Legend
Player has won all Triple Crown events at least once
The names of active players are marked in bold

Champions by country[edit]

Country Players Total First title Last title
 England 13 64 1969 2019
 Scotland 5 30 1989 2011
 Wales 5 22 1970 2018
 Northern Ireland 3 8 1972 2018
 Canada 1 4 1980 1986
 Australia 1 4 2010 2015
 China 1 3 2005 2011
 Ireland 2 2 1977 1997
 South Africa 1 1 1979 1979

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Mark Selby eyes snooker's Triple Crown after Masters win". BBC Sport. 21 January 2013. Archived from the original on 9 March 2014. Retrieved 2 December 2013.
  2. ^ "World Snooker Championship: Mark Selby plays down 'Triple' bid" (19 April 2013). BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 23 April 2013. Retrieved 2 December 2013.
  3. ^ "Selby Keeps Triple Crown Dream Alive". worlsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. 24 April 2013. Archived from the original on 3 December 2013. Retrieved 2 December 2013.
  4. ^ "Hat-trick seeking Selby setting sights on claiming world crown at Crucible". Yorkshire Post. 22 January 2013. Archived from the original on 3 December 2013. Retrieved 2 December 2013.
  5. ^ Foulds, Neal. "UK Championship: Neil Robertson tipped for win in York by Neal Foulds". Archived from the original on 1 December 2013. Retrieved 2 December 2013.
  6. ^ Head, Simon (10 January 2013). "Murphy's law: Shaun Murphy wants Masters title to complete triple crown". Daily Mirror. Archived from the original on 1 May 2014. Retrieved 2 December 2013.
  7. ^ "Betway UK Championship Prize Money To Reach £1M Barrier - World Snooker". World Snooker. Retrieved 18 February 2019.
  8. ^ "Peter Ebdon hails Germany as 'one of the top places to play snooker'". Metro. Archived from the original on 6 February 2019. Retrieved 18 February 2019.
  9. ^ "Davis: O'Sullivan playing greatest snooker in sport's history". Eurosport UK. 28 April 2014. Archived from the original on 20 November 2017. Retrieved 18 February 2019.
  10. ^ Hayton, Eric (2004). The CueSport Book of Professional Snooker. Lowestoft: Rose Villa Publications. p. 10. ISBN 0-9548549-0-X.
  11. ^ Everton, Clive. "Obituary: John Spencer". the Guardian. Archived from the original on 31 January 2019. Retrieved 18 February 2019.
  12. ^ Turner, Chris. "The Masters". cajt.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk. Chris Turner's Snooker Archive. Archived from the original on 7 January 2012. Retrieved 10 July 2012.
  13. ^ Eric, Hayton (2004). The CueSport Book of Professional Snooker: The Complete Record & History. London: Rose Villa Publications. p. 11. ISBN 0-9548549-0-X.
  14. ^ Turner, Chris. "UK Championship". cajt.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk. Chris Turner's Snooker Archive. Archived from the original on 16 February 2012. Retrieved 12 May 2019.
  15. ^ "UK Championship". Snooker Scene. Archived from the original on 24 January 2013. Retrieved 17 June 2011.
  16. ^ a b "1977 UK Championship". Global Snooker Centre. Archived from the original on 1 September 2006. Retrieved 21 May 2012.
  17. ^ "1982 Masters Results". Snooker Database. Archived from the original on 7 October 2011. Retrieved 5 May 2011.
  18. ^ "The Masters". Snooker Scene. Archived from the original on 24 January 2013. Retrieved 8 August 2012.
  19. ^ "Steve Davis". The WPBSA World Seniors Tour. Archived from the original on 18 February 2019. Retrieved 18 February 2019.
  20. ^ "Selby Keeps Triple Crown Dream Alive". worlsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. 24 April 2013. Archived from the original on 3 December 2013. Retrieved 2 December 2013.
  21. ^ "Hat-trick seeking Selby setting sights on claiming world crown at Crucible". Yorkshire Post. 22 January 2013. Archived from the original on 3 December 2013. Retrieved 2 December 2013.
  22. ^ "Neil Robertson fights back against Mark Selby to win UK Championship". theguardian.com. 8 December 2013. Archived from the original on 22 August 2017. Retrieved 9 December 2013.
  23. ^ "World Snooker final: Mark Selby beats Ronnie O'Sullivan 18-14". BBC Sport. 5 May 2014. Archived from the original on 6 May 2014. Retrieved 5 May 2014.
  24. ^ Dee, John (6 May 2003). "Snooker: Williams clinches thriller". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 2 May 2011. Retrieved 12 May 2011.
  25. ^ Curtis, John (6 May 2003). "Article: Snooker: Williams makes it a triple crown". The News Letter (archived on Questia Online Library). Retrieved 19 January 2011.(subscription required)
  26. ^ "Neil Robertson fights back to take UK Championship crown". RTÉ.ie. 8 December 2013. Archived from the original on 12 December 2013. Retrieved 9 December 2013.
  27. ^ "UK Championship: Ronnie O'Sullivan beats Mark Allen to win seventh title". BBC Sport. Archived from the original on 11 December 2018. Retrieved 18 February 2019.
  28. ^ Turner, Chris. "UK Championship". cajt.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk. Chris Turner's Snooker Archvie. Archived from the original on 16 February 2012. Retrieved 19 January 2011.
  29. ^ "Hall of Fame (UK Championship)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 6 December 2013. Retrieved 22 June 2013.
  30. ^ Turner, Chris. "The Masters". cajt.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk. Chris Turner's Snooker Archive. Archived from the original on 7 January 2012. Retrieved 19 January 2011.
  31. ^ "Hall of Fame (Masters)". Snooker.org. Retrieved 22 June 2013.
  32. ^ Turner, Chris. "World Professional Championship". cajt.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk. Chris Turner's Snooker Archive. Archived from the original on 16 April 2013. Retrieved 19 January 2011.
  33. ^ "Hall of Fame (World Championship)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 22 January 2017. Retrieved 24 February 2011.
  34. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar "Betfred World Championship - World Snooker". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 21 September 2018. Retrieved 18 February 2019.
  35. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al "Dafabet Masters - World Snooker". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 20 September 2018. Retrieved 18 February 2019.
  36. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag "Betway UK Championship 2019 - World Snooker". World Snooker. Archived from the original on 22 January 2019. Retrieved 18 February 2019.
  37. ^ "williamhill.com UK Championship (2011)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 4 February 2012. Retrieved 12 October 2011.
  38. ^ "BGC Masters (2012)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 22 July 2013. Retrieved 28 October 2011.
  39. ^ "Betfred.com World Championship (2012)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 22 July 2013. Retrieved 23 February 2012.
  40. ^ "williamhill.com UK Championship (2012)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 22 October 2012. Retrieved 30 July 2012.
  41. ^ "Betfair Masters (2013)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 23 October 2012. Retrieved 30 July 2012.
  42. ^ "Betfair World Championship (2013)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 23 October 2012. Retrieved 30 July 2012.
  43. ^ "williamhill.com UK Championship (2013)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 21 October 2013. Retrieved 9 April 2013.
  44. ^ "Dafabet Masters (2014)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 23 October 2013. Retrieved 9 April 2013.
  45. ^ "Dafabet World Championship (2014)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 8 April 2014. Retrieved 9 April 2013.
  46. ^ "Coral UK Championship (2014)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 7 December 2014. Retrieved 7 December 2014.
  47. ^ "Dafabet Masters (2015)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 1 July 2014. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  48. ^ "World Championship (2015)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 25 March 2015. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  49. ^ "Betway UK Championship (2015)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 5 December 2015. Retrieved 7 December 2015.
  50. ^ "Dafabet Masters (2016)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 16 January 2016. Retrieved 19 January 2016.
  51. ^ "Betfred World Championship (2016)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 4 May 2016. Retrieved 3 May 2016.
  52. ^ "Betway UK Championship (2016)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 19 November 2016. Retrieved 5 December 2016.
  53. ^ "Dafabet Masters (2017)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 21 December 2016. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  54. ^ "Betfred World Championship (2017)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 24 April 2017. Retrieved 2 May 2017.
  55. ^ "Betway UK Championship (2017)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 12 December 2017. Retrieved 11 December 2017.
  56. ^ "Dafabet Masters (2018)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 12 December 2017. Retrieved 22 January 2018.
  57. ^ "Betfred World Championship (2018)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 22 April 2018. Retrieved 8 May 2018.
  58. ^ "Betway UK Championship (2018)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 22 November 2018. Retrieved 9 December 2018.
  59. ^ "Dafabet Masters (2019)". Snooker.org. Archived from the original on 21 January 2019. Retrieved 21 January 2019.
  60. ^ Harris, Daniel (6 May 2019). "World Snooker Championship: Trump beats Higgins 18-9 to win 2019 final". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 6 May 2019.