Triptane

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Triptane
Skeletal formula of triptane
Ball-and-Stick model of triptane
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
2,2,3-Trimethylbutane[1]
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
1730756
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.006.680 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 207-346-3
UNII
UN number 1206
  • InChI=1S/C7H16/c1-6(2)7(3,4)5/h6H,1-5H3 checkY
    Key: ZISSAWUMDACLOM-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  • CC(C)C(C)(C)C
Properties
C7H16
Molar mass 100.205 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid
Odor Odorless
Density 0.693 g mL−1
Melting point −26 to −24 °C; −15 to −11 °F; 247 to 249 K
Boiling point 80.8 to 81.2 °C; 177.3 to 178.1 °F; 353.9 to 354.3 K
Vapor pressure 23.2286 kPa (at 37.7 °C)
4.1 nmol Pa−1 kg−1
-88.36·10−6 cm3/mol
1.389
Thermochemistry
213.51 J K−1 mol−1
292.25 J K−1 mol−1
−238.0 – −235.8 kJ mol−1
−4.80449 – −4.80349 MJ mol−1
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS02: Flammable GHS07: Exclamation mark GHS08: Health hazard GHS09: Environmental hazard
Danger
H225, H302, H305, H315, H336, H400
P210, P261, P273, P301+P310, P331
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
0
3
0
Flash point −7 °C (19 °F; 266 K)
450 °C (842 °F; 723 K)
Explosive limits 1–7%
Related compounds
Related alkanes
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Triptane, or 2,2,3-trimethylbutane, is an organic chemical compound with the molecular formula C7H16 or (H3C-)3C-C(-CH3)2H. It is therefore an alkane, specifically the most compact and heavily branched of the heptane isomers, the only one with a butane (C4) backbone.

Triptane is commonly used as an anti-knock additive in aviation fuels.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Triptan - Compound Summary". PubChem Compound. USA: National Center for Biotechnology Information. 26 March 2005. Identification and Related Records. Retrieved 11 March 2012.