Troféu Brasil de Atletismo

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Troféu Brasil de Atletismo
Athletics pictogram.svg
SportTrack and field
Founded1945
CountryBrazil

The Troféu Brasil de Atletismo (Brazil Athletics Trophy) is an annual track and field meeting which serves as Brazil's national championships for the sport for athletics clubs. The Brazilian Athletics Confederation has not explicitly designated an annual national championships, thus this also serves as the de facto senior athletics championships.[1][2] It has also been used to determine the track and field team for Brazil at the Olympics.[3]

The location and timing of the event varies, with the major cities of Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo frequently serving as host.[4][5][6]

First held in 1945, the competition became Brazil's foremost track and field competition after the mid-1980s. The biennial Campeonato Brasileiro de Seleções Estaduis had previously been treated as the national championship event in the period from 1929 to 1985.[7] The Troféu Brasil de Atletismo has not been held consistently since its inauguration and reached its thirtieth edition in 2011.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Biscayart, Eduardo (2005-06-21). Gregorio flies to 17.73m at Brazilian Nationals. IAAF. Retrieved on 2016-09-04.
  2. ^ Biscayart, Eduardo (2006-09-26). Murer vaults 4.57m at Brazilian Nationals. IAAF. Retrieved on 2016-09-04.
  3. ^ Troféu Brasil de atletismo define time brasileiro para os Jogos Olímpicos (in Portuguese) (archived). Folha (2016-06-30). Retrieved on 2016-09-04.
  4. ^ Biscayart, Eduardo (2012-07-02). De Ara\xfajo tallies 8267pt national record at Brazilian championships. IAAF. Retrieved on 2016-09-04.
  5. ^ Biscayart, Eduardo (2009-06-08). Murer vaults to world leading 4.82m at Brazilian nationals. IAAF. Retrieved on 2016-09-04.
  6. ^ Biscayart, Eduardo (2006-09-26). Murer vaults 4.57m at Brazilian Nationals. IAAF. Retrieved on 2016-09-04.
  7. ^ Brazilian Championships. GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 2016-09-04.
  8. ^ Biscayart, Eduardo (2011-08-08). Three South American records fall in Sao Paulo. IAAF. Retrieved on 2016-09-04.