Troller's Gill

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Troller's Gill

Troller's Gill is a limestone gorge, close to the village of Appletreewick and 4.7 miles (7.5 km) south east of Grassington in the Yorkshire Dales (grid reference SE068619).[1] The gorge, which is 0.5 miles (0.8 km) in length, is also known as Trollerdale.[2]

Description[edit]

The gorge is named after the supposed existence of trolls who used to live there. A survey conducted in the reign of Edward II of England listed it as being Gordale in Appletreewick. Speight suggests that this is of Danish influence from the word geir; a triangular piece of land that ends in a chasm.[3]

Skyreholme Beck flows through the gorge,[4] but for most of the year the stream bed is dry with the water flowing underground.[5] The Gill is also the location of an old lead and later fluorspar mine which was last worked in the 1960s.

Legends[edit]

Legend has it that the Gill is the home of the mythical monstrous black dog Barghest who can turn one to stone with a look.[5] It has also been suggested by some that the Barghest story was a major influence on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle when he was penning The Hound of the Baskervilles.[6][7]

Local folklore declared that trolls lived in the gorge (hence its name) and would push stones down from the deep sides to people travelling up and down the gorge.[8]

Roger and the Rottentrolls is a fictional children's television program which takes the name of its setting from Troller's Gill; however, filming took place at Brimham Rocks, a short distance away.[9]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "98" (Map). Wensleydale & Upper Wharfedale (B1 ed.). 1:50,000. Landranger. Ordnance Survey. 2002. ISBN 0-319-22698-0. 
  2. ^ Pauling, Keith (2010). Discovering the Dales Way. Keith Pauling. p. 52. ISBN 978-1-4466-3705-0. 
  3. ^ Speight, Harry (1900). "31. Up the Dale to Burnsall". Upper Wharfedale. Being a complete account of the history, antiquities and scenery of the picturesque valley of the Wharfe, from Otley to Langstrothdale. London: Eliot Stock. p. 384. OCLC 7225949. 
  4. ^ Davies, Carey (5 January 2015). "Where the miniature meets the magnificent". The Guardian. Retrieved 11 October 2016. 
  5. ^ a b "Troller's Gill". Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority. Retrieved 11 October 2016. 
  6. ^ "Forget Dartmoor - did The Hound of the Baskervilles take its inspiration from this Dales village?". The Yorkshire Post. 18 September 2010. Retrieved 11 October 2016. 
  7. ^ Hazan, Sophie (4 January 2006). "Trail of the Hound of the Baskervilles may lead to a Yorkshire moor". Yorkshire Evening Post. Retrieved 11 October 2016. 
  8. ^ Reid, Mike. "Burnsall & Trollers Gill" (PDF). Northern Echo. Retrieved 11 October 2016. 
  9. ^ "Harrogate and Distict In Film and Television : Pt1". Visit Harrogate. Retrieved 11 October 2016. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 54°03′11″N 1°53′51″W / 54.05301°N 1.89762°W / 54.05301; -1.89762