Tron Lightcycle Power Run

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Tron Lightcycle Power Run
Chinese: 创极速光轮
TRON Lightcycle Power Run, attraction exterior.jpg
Shanghai Disneyland
Park sectionTomorrowland
Coordinates31°08′37″N 121°39′09″E / 31.1437282°N 121.6525508°E / 31.1437282; 121.6525508Coordinates: 31°08′37″N 121°39′09″E / 31.1437282°N 121.6525508°E / 31.1437282; 121.6525508
StatusOperating
Opening dateJune 16, 2016 (2016-06-16)
Tron Lightcycle Power Run
Chinese: 创极速光轮 at Shanghai Disneyland at RCDB

Pictures of Tron Lightcycle Power Run
Chinese: 创极速光轮 at Shanghai Disneyland at RCDB
Magic Kingdom
NameTRON Lightcycle Run[1]
Park sectionTomorrowland
StatusUnder construction
Opening date2021
TRON Lightcycle Run[1] at Magic Kingdom at RCDB
Pictures of TRON Lightcycle Run[1] at Magic Kingdom at RCDB
General statistics
TypeSteel – Launched
ManufacturerVekoma
DesignerWalt Disney Imagineering
ModelMotorbike roller coaster
Height78.1 ft (23.8 m)
Length3,169.3 ft (966.0 m)
Speed59.3[2] mph (95.4 km/h)
Inversions0
Duration~2:00
Capacity1,680 riders per hour
G-force4
Height restriction4[3] ft (122 cm)
Trains7 trains with 7 cars. Riders are arranged 2 across in a single row for a total of 14 riders per train.
ThemeTron
SponsorChevrolet
MusicDaft Punk, Joseph Trapanese
Fastpass available
Single rider line available
Must transfer from wheelchair

Tron Lightcycle Power Run is a semi-enclosed launched steel roller coaster attraction at Shanghai Disneyland Park, and an upcoming attraction at the Magic Kingdom in Walt Disney World. Based on the Tron series, the attraction takes guests on a ride through the Grid on their own light cycle.[3]

History[edit]

The Shanghai Disneyland ride debuted along with the rest of Shanghai Disneyland on June 16, 2016.[3][4]

The Magic Kingdom version of the attraction is planned to be opened by 2021, in time for Walt Disney World’s 50th anniversary.[5][6][7] It was first announced at the D23 Expo on July 15, 2017[5][8] as part of the unveiling of 23 improvements to Disney Parks,[9] including 4 new rides across the theme parks.[6]

Design[edit]

In Shanghai Disneyland, the attraction is located inside, underneath a color-shifting canopy in Tomorrowland.[10] The planned Magic Kingdom port of the attraction will be placed in a completely new section of Tomorrowland to the north of Space Mountain.[5][6] The Magic Kingdom version's official name was revealed as the Tron Lightcycle Run.[1]

The coaster's track takes riders inside and outside the attraction's building, reaching speeds of nearly 60 miles per hour (97 km/h)—the fastest for any Disney roller coaster.[2][4]

The attraction's motorbike-styled vehicles were created by Walt Disney Imagineering as a method of specializing individual rider experience. The ride was then given a Tron-theme because the ride vehicles resembled the lightcycles featured in Tron: Legacy.[2][11] When aboard the ride vehicle, riders lean forward and grip a set of handlebars. A pad situated behind the seat secures the rider in place.[12]

Rankings[edit]

Golden Ticket Awards: Top steel Roller Coasters
Year 2019
Ranking 35[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Carter, Ashley (August 23, 2019). "Tron Coaster Vehicle on Display at Disney's D23 Expo". News 13. Archived from the original on August 25, 2019. Retrieved August 25, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c Nolfi, Joey (May 9, 2016). "Watch a POV video of Shanghai Disneyland's TRON: Lightcycle Power Run roller coaster". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on September 20, 2016. Retrieved August 22, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  3. ^ a b c d "TRON Lightcycle Power Run". Shanghai Disneyland. The Walt Disney Company. Archived from the original on February 7, 2016. Retrieved February 6, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  4. ^ a b Pimental, Joseph (April 12, 2016). "Photos: Shanghai Disneyland will have a familiar feel". The Orange County Register. Archived from the original on August 22, 2016. Retrieved August 22, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  5. ^ a b c Smith, Thomas. "New Tron Attraction Coming to Magic Kingdom Park at Walt Disney World Resort". Disney Parks Blog. Archived from the original on July 16, 2017. Retrieved July 16, 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  6. ^ a b c Lambert, Marjie. "4 new rides coming to Disney World: Ratatouille, Tron, Mickey Mouse, Guardians of the Galaxy". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on July 16, 2017. Retrieved July 16, 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  7. ^ Bevil, Dewayne (July 15, 2017). "Coming to Disney World: Tron, Guardians of the Galaxy ride, 'Star Wars' hotel". Orlando Sentinel. Archived from the original on July 16, 2017. Retrieved July 16, 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  8. ^ Smith, Thomas (July 15, 2017). "First Mickey-Themed Ride-Through Attraction, Mickey and Minnie's Runaway Railway, Coming to Disney's Hollywood Studios". Disney Parks Blog. Archived from the original on July 15, 2017. Retrieved July 15, 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  9. ^ Levine, Arthur (July 18, 2017). "Disney announces 23 wild new developments for its theme parks". USA Today. Archived from the original on July 19, 2017. Retrieved July 20, 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  10. ^ "Opening Date Set for Shanghai Disney Resort, Disney's Newest World-Class Destination". Disney Parks Blog. Archived from the original on June 18, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  11. ^ Fritz, Ben (June 23, 2016). "At Shanghai Disneyland, a High-Tech Pirates of the Caribbean". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on June 25, 2016. Retrieved August 22, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  12. ^ Sharon, Keith (June 16, 2016). "Video: How the TRON ride feels and Tomorrowland looks at Shanghai Disneyland". The Orange County Register. Archived from the original on August 22, 2016. Retrieved August 22, 2016. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  13. ^ "2019 Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 23 (6.2): 53. September 2019. Retrieved September 10, 2019.

External links[edit]