Troop engagements of the American Civil War, 1864

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Years
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865
or return to the main page.

The following engagements took place in the year 1864 during the American Civil War. The Union armies, under the command of U.S. Grant, launched multiple offenses in all theaters of the war, in an attempt to prevent Confederate forces from transferring troops from one army to another.

History[edit]

19th century lithograph of the Battle of the Wilderness
19th century illustration of the Battle of the Wilderness

In March, Ulysses S. Grant was promoted to lieutenant general and appointed general-in-chief of the Union Army. He decided on a strategy of simultaneous offenses in the Eastern, Western, and Trans-Mississippi Theaters in order to grind down and ultimately defeat the Confederate armies. Grant himself planned to travel with the Army of the Potomac, commanded by George G. Meade, and the IX Corps, commanded by Ambrose Burnside, both to coordinate the two forces and to avoid the politics of Washington, D.C. (Burnside was senior to Meade and therefore would have the right to command the Army of the Potomac, so in order to retain Meade Grant had both commanders report to him. Grant concluded on May 25 that this command structure was unwieldy and placed Burnside under Meade's command.)[1] In the Eastern Theater, Grant's forces fought General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia in a series of battles that became known as the Overland Campaign from May to June. Although he lost heavily during the campaign and failed to gain a tactical advantage in any of the battles, Grant inflicted a larger percentage of casualties on Lee than the Union army incurred and also forced Lee into retreating closer to Richmond.[2] Following the Battle of Cold Harbor, Grant crossed the James River and attacked the city of Petersburg, which was a vital rail center for Lee's supply lines to North Carolina. Several Union attacks on the Confederate defenses near the city in early June resulted in failure; as a result, Grant settled into a nine-month siege at Petersburg, during which he continued to move westward in order to cut Lee's supply lines.[3]

Photograph of Ulysses S. Grant
Ulysses S. Grant, general-in-chief of the Union armies

Grant planned for two other campaigns in the Eastern Theater: the Army of the James commanded by Major General Benjamin Butler landed on the Bermuda Hundred peninsula near Petersburg, with orders to cut the Richmond & Petersburg Railroad and to prevent reinforcements from reaching Lee's army. After building fortifications on the peninsula, Butler made several advances towards the railroad, each time retreating back to his fortifications after a brief skirmish with Confederate forces. Following the Battle of Ware Bottom Church, the Confederates built a line of fortifications parallel to the Union lines, bottling up Butler's force and allowing reinforcements to be detached to Lee.[4]

In the Shenandoah Valley, another Union force commanded by Major General Franz Sigel advanced southward until he encountered a small Confederate force commanded by Major General John C. Breckinridge at the Battle of New Market on May 15, which resulted in a Confederate victory. Sigel was replaced by David Hunter, who started his campaign near the end of May.[5] His victory at Piedemont on June 5 caused to Lee to detach his Second Corps, under Lieutenant General Jubal Early, to the Valley to deal with the Union forces. Hunter attacked Early's command at Lynchburg but was defeated; Hunter then retreated through West Virginia to the Ohio River, allowing Early to move north through the Valley. Early then launched a raid on Washington, D.C., but due to the delay caused by the Battle of Monocacy failed to arrive at the city before Union reinforcements did, making a successful attack impossible. Early was then able to retreat back into the Shenandoah Valley with the supplies his army had seized and from there launched several additional small raids which the local Union commanders were unable to prevent.[6] To deal with these raids and combat the Confederate forces in the Valley effectively, Grant consolidated the various military departments in the area into the Middle Military Division, commanded by Philip H. Sheridan. During a three-month campaign, Sheridan successfully destroyed both the Confederate fighting capabilities in the Shenandoah and the supplies the Confederates needed to feed Lee's army at Petersburg.[7]

In the Western Theater, Union forces were placed in the Military Division of the Mississippi, commanded by Major General William T. Sherman, who had orders to capture Atlanta. During the three-month Atlanta Campaign, Sherman outflanked Joseph E. Johnston's Army of Tennessee out of one position after another until the two forces reached Atlanta. Fearing he would abandon the city without a fight, Confederate President Jefferson Davis replaced Johnston with John B. Hood, who launched a series of attacks on Sherman's armies, which each time failed with heavy Confederate casualties. When Sherman cut the Montgomery & Atlanta Railroad in early September, the Confederate supply lines into the city were cut and Hood was forced to abandon Atlanta.[8] For the next two months, Hood and Sherman skirmished as Hood attempted to cut Sherman's supply lines to the North; Sherman eventually gave up trying to catch Hood and instead embarked on his Savannah campaign. Hood, instead of following Sherman, moved north into Tennessee, intending to capture Nashville before going into Kentucky. He lost heavily in a frontal attack at the Battle of Franklin on November 30, suffering over 7,000 casualties including thirteen generals killed, wounded, or captured;[9] this left him with too few men to overrun the Union fortifications at Nashville, so Hood instead constructed fortifications a few miles to the south and tried to entice the Unio commander, Major General George H. Thomas, to attack him. On December 15–16, Thomas did attack, routing most of the Confederate army on both days and capturing over 70 cannons and 15,000 prisoners. Hood retreated back to Alabama, where he was relieved of command by his own request; the Army of Tennessee was reduced to barely 20,000 men by casualties and desertions during the retreat.[10]

In the Trans-Mississippi Theater, Major General Nathaniel P. Banks led his Army of the Gulf up the Red River in Louisiana, intending to invade eastern Texas and to seize cotton to supply the New England cotton mills. The Confederate commander of the District of Western Louisiana, Major General Richard Taylor, steadily retreated until both forces neared Mansfield, where on April 7, Taylor attacked and routed Banks' force; another battle was fought the next day near Pleasant Hill but the Confederates were defeated. Banks continued retreating along the river until he reached the Red River's confluence with the Mississippi. A simultaneous campaign from Union controlled northern Arkansas was launched, which was planned to link up with Banks' force at Shreveport, Louisiana, but was turned back due to a lack of supplies.[11]

Engagements[edit]

Date Engagement Military units Losses
January 17 Dandridge, Tennessee Elements of Confederate First Corps, Army of Northern Virginia and Union IV Corps, Army of the Cumberland Confederate unknown, Union 150[12]
January 26 Athens, Alabama Forces: Confederate cavalry brigade, Union garrison Losses: Confederate 30, Union 20[13]
January 27 – 28 Fair Garden, Tennessee Elements of Confederate First Corps, Army of Northern Virginia and Union IV Corps, Army of the Cumberland Confederate 165, Union 100[14]
February 6 – 7 Morton's Ford, Virginia Confederate Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, Union two divisions from the Army of the Potomac Confederate 60, Union 261[15]
February 13 Middle Boggy, Oklahoma Confederate Seminole battalion of Mounted Rifles, Union 14th Kansas Cavalry and two howitzers Confederate 47, Union 0[16]
February 14 – 20 Meridian, Mississippi Confederate Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana, Union Army of the Tennessee Confederate 5, Union 170[17]
February 20 Olustee, Florida Confederate District of East Florida, Union detachment from the Department of the South Confederate 946, Union 1,861[18]
February 22 Okolona, Mississippi Confederate Forrest's Cavalry Corps, Union detachment, Army of the Tennessee Confederate 144, Union 388[19]
February 22 – 27 Dalton I, Georgia Confederate Army of the Tennessee, Union Army of the Cumberland Confederate 140, Union 289[20]
March 2 Walkerton, Virginia Confederate Department of Richmond, Union Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac Confederate none, Union 100[21]
March 14 Fort DeRussy, Louisiana Confederate District of West Louisiana, Union Army of the Gulf Confederate 269, Union 48[22]
March 18 Laredo, Texas Confederate 33rd Texas Cavalry, Union 1st Texas Cavalry unknown[23]
March 21 Henderson's Hill, Louisiana Confederate and Union cavalry Confederate 250, Union unknown[24]
March 25 Paducah, Kentucky Confederate Forrest's Cavalry Corps, Union garrison Confederate 50, Union 90[25]
April 3–4 Elkin's Ferry, Arkansas Confederate District of Arkansas, Union Department of Arkansas Confederate 29, Union 26[26]
April 7 Wilson's Farm, Louisiana Cavalry from Confederate District of West Louisiana and Union Army of the Gulf unknown[27]
April 8 Mansfield, Louisiana Confederate District of West Louisiana, Union Army of the Gulf Confederate 1,000, Union 2,235[28]
April 9 Pleasant Hill, Louisiana Confederate District of West Louisiana, Union Army of the Gulf Confederate 1,626, Union 1,369[29]
April 10–15 Prairie D'Ane, Arkansas Confederate District of Arkansas, Union Department of Arkansas Confederate 50, Union 100[30]
April 12 Blair's Landing, Louisiana Confederate cavalry brigade, Union transports and gunboats Confederate 57, Union 60[31]
April 12 Fort Pillow, Tennessee Confederate Forrest's Cavalry Corps, Union garrison Confederate 100, Union 549[32]
April 17–20 Plymouth, North Carolina Confederate infantry division from Department of North Carolina, Union garrison Confederate 300, Union 2,900 (including 2,834 prisoners)[33]
April 18 Poison Spring, Arkansas Union detachment, Confederate cavalry from Trans-Mississippi Department Confederate 114, Union 301[34]
April 23 Monett's Ferry, Louisiana Union and Confederate cavalry Confederate 400, Union 200[35]
April 25 Marks' Mills, Arkansas Confederate District of Arkansas, Union Department of Arkansas Confederate 293, Union 1,500[36]
April 30 Jenkins' Ferry, Arkansas Confederate District of Arkansas, Union Department of Arkansas Confederate 1,000, Union 700[37]
May 5 Albemarle Sound, North Carolina Confederate ships Albemarle and Bombshell, Union ships Miami and two others 88 total[38]
May 5–7 the Wilderness, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the Potomac and IX Corps Confederate 10,830, Union 17,666[39]
May 6–7 Port Walthall Junction, Virginia Confederate Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia, Union Army of the James 550 total[40]
May 7–13 Rocky Face Ridge, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Military Division of the Mississippi Confederate 600, Union 837[41]
May 8–21 Spotsylvania Court House, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the Potomac Confederate 12,062, Union 18,399[42]
May 9 Swift Creek and Fort Clifton, Virginia Confederate Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia, Union Army of the James 990 total[43]
May 9 Cloyd's Mountain, Virginia Confederate Department of Southwest Virginia, Union Army of West Virginia Confederate 538, Union 688[44]
May 10 Chester Station, Virginia Confederate Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia, Union Army of the James 569 total[45]
May 10 Cove Mountain, Virginia Cavalry from Confederate Department of South-West Virginia and Union Department of West Virginia 300 total[46]
May 11 Yellow Tavern, Virginia Cavalry corps from Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and Union Army of the Potomac 800 total[47]
May 12–16 Proctor's Creek (Drewry's Bluff), Virginia Confederate Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia, Union Army of the James Confederate 1,000, Union 3,004[48]
May 13–15 Resaca, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Military Division of the Mississippi Confederate 2,800, Union 2,747[49]
May 15 New Market, Virginia Confederate Department of Western Virginia, Union Department of West Virginia Confederate 587, Union 762[50]
May 16 Mansura, Louisiana Confederate District of West Louisiana, Union Army of the Gulf Confederate unknown, Union unknown[51]
May 17 Adairsville, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Military Division of the Mississippi Confederate unknown, Union 200[52]
May 18 Yellow Bayou, Louisiana Confederate District of West Louisiana, Union Army of the Gulf Confederate 500, Union 360[53]
May 20 Ware Bottom Church and Howlett Line, Virginia Confederate Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia, Union Army of the James 1,500 total[54]
May 23–26 North Anna, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the Potomac Confederate 1,251, Union 2,138[55]
May 24 Wilson's Wharf Confederate cavalry from Army of Northern Virginia, Union detachment from Army of the James Confederate 140, Union 26[56]
May 25–26 New Hope Church, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Military Division of the Mississippi Confederate 350, Union 665[57]
May 27 Pickett's Mill, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Military Division of the Mississippi Confederate 450, Union 1,600[58]
May 28 Haw's Shop, Virginia Confederate Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, Union Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac Confederate 400, Union 344[59]
May 28 Dallas, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Military Division of the Mississippi Confederate 1,000–1,500, Union 380[60]
May 28–30 Totopotomoy Creek and Bethesda Church, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the Potomac Confederate 1,159, Union 731[61]
May 30 Matadequin Creek (Old Church), Virginia Cavalry brigade from Army of Northern Virginia, cavalry brigade from Union Army of the Potomac Confederate unknown, Union 90[62]
May 31 – June 12 Cold Harbor, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the Potomac Confederate 4,847, Union 14,932[63]
June 5 Piedmont, Virginia Confederate Department of Western Virginia, Union Department of West Virginia Confederate 1,600, Union 875[64]
June 5–6 Old River Lake, Arkansas Confederates one division from District of Arkansas, Union two brigades from District of Arkansas Confederate 37, Union 133[65]
June 9 Petersburg I, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the Potomac 120 total[66]
June 9–18 Lost Mountain–Brushy Mountain Line, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Military Division of the Mississippi unknown[67]
June 10 Brices Crossroads, Mississippi Confederate Forrest's Cavalry Corps, Union infantry and cavalry Confederate 493, Union 2,612[68]
June 11–12 Trevilian Station, Virginia Cavalry corps from Union Army of the Potomac and Confederate Army of Northern Virginia Confederate 1,071, Union 1,007[69]
June 11–12 Cynthiana, Kentucky Confederate Morgan's brigade, Union garrison Confederate 1,000, Union 1,092[70]
June 15–18 Petersburg II, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the Potomac Confederate 2,974–4,700, Union 9,964–10,600[71]
June 17–18 Lynchburg, Virginia Confederate Department of Southwest Virginia and Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, Union Department of West Virginia Confederate 200, Union 700[72]
June 21–23 Jerusalem Plank Road, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the Potomac Confederate 572, Union 2,962[73]
June 22 Kolb's Farm, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Army of the Ohio and XX Corps Confederate 1,000, Union 350[74]
June 24 Samaria Church (Saint Mary's Church), Virginia Cavalry corps from Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and Union Army of the Potomac Confederate 250, Union 350[75]
June 25 Staunton River Bridge, Virginia Confederate Home Guards, Union cavalry division from Army of the Potomac 150 total[76]
June 27 Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Military Division of the Mississippi Confederate 1,000, Union 3,000[77]
June 28 Sappony Church, Virginia Cavalry from Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and Union Army of the Potomac unknown[78]
June 29 Reams Station I, Virginia Cavalry from Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and Union Army of the Potomac unknown[79]
July 9 Monocacy, Maryland Confederate Army of the Valley District, Union Middle Department Confederate 700–900, Union 1,294[80]
July 11–12 Fort Stevens, District of Columbia Confederate Army of the Valley, Union Department of Washington Confederate 500, Union 373[81]
July 18 Bartram's Shop, Mississippi Confederate Forrest's Cavalry Corps, Union XVI Corps Confederate unknown, Union 36[82]
July 14–15 Tupelo, Mississippi Confederate Department of Mississippi, Alabama, and East Tennessee, Union XVI Corps Confederate 1,326, Union 674.[83]
July 17–18 Cool Spring, Virginia Confederate Army of the Valley District, Union Army of West Virginia Confederate 397, Union 422[84]
July 20 Rutherford's Farm, Virginia Confederate detachment from Army of the Valley, Union cavalry division from Army of West Virginia Confederate 500, Union 242[85]
July 20 Peachtree Creek, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Army of the Cumberland Confederate 4,796, Union 1,710[86]
July 22 Atlanta, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Army of the Tennessee Confederate 8,499, Union 3,641[87]
July 24 Second Kernstown, Virginia Confederate Army of the Valley, Union Army of West Virginia Confederate 600, Union 1,185[88]
July 27–29 First Deep Bottom, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union II Corps and cavalry from Army of the Potomac 1,000 total[89]
July 28 Ezra Church, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union XV Corps Confederate 4,642, Union 700[90]
July 28–29 Killdeer Mountain, Dakota Territory Union Department of the Northwest, Lakota and Dakota Sioux tribes Union 15, Dakotas and Lakotas 31[91]
July 30 The Crater, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the Potomac Confederate 1,491, Union 3,798[92]
August 1 Folck's Mill, Maryland Confederate cavalry from Army of the Valley, Union garrison from Department of West Virginia Confederate 30, Union 30[93]
August 5 Mobile Bay, Alabama Confederate and Union naval forces Confederate 1,500, Union 327[94]
August 5–7 Utoy Creek, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Army of the Ohio Confederate 225, Union 400[95]
August 7 Moorefield, West Virginia Cavalry from Union Department of West Virginia and Confederate Army of the Valley Confederate 500, Union 31[96]
August 7–9 Badlands, Dakota Territory Union Department of the Northwest, Lakota and Dakota Sioux tribes Union 9 killed and at least 100 wounded, Dakotas and Lakotas 100 killed.[97]
August 13–20 Second Deep Bottom, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the Potomac Confederate 1,300, Union 2,900[98]
August 14–15 Dalton II, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Army of the Tennessee, Army of the Cumberland, and Army of the Ohio unknown[99]
August 16 Guard Hill, Virginia Confederate Army of the Valley District, Union Army of the Shenandoah Confederate 480, Union 71[100]
August 18–21 Globe Tavern, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the Potomac Confederate 1,600, Union 4,455[101]
August 20 Lovejoy's Station, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Army of the Tennessee, Army of the Cumberland, and Army of the Ohio Confederate 240, Union 237[102]
August 21 Summit Point and Cameron's Depot, West Virginia Confederate Army of the Valley District, Union Army of the Shenandoah Confederate 400, Union 600[103]
August 21 Second Memphis, Tennessee Confederate Forrest's Cavalry Corps, Union garrison Confederate 62, Union 80[104]
August 25 Second Reams Station, Virginia Confederate Third Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, Union II Corps and cavalry, Army of the Potomac Confederate 814, Union 2,742[105]
August 28–29 Smithfield Crossing, West Virginia Confederate Army of the Valley District, Union Army of the Shenandoah Confederate 200, Union 100[106]
August 29–30 Chaffin's Farm, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the Potomac Confederate 1,700, Union 3,300[107]
August 29–30 New Market Heights, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the Potomac Confederate 50, Union 850[108]
August 31 – September 1 Jonesboro, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Army of the Tennessee, Army of the Cumberland, and Army of the Ohio Confederate 2,000, Union 1,149[109]
September 3–4 Berryville, Virginia Confederate Army of the Valley District, Union Army of the Shenandoah Confederate 195, Union 312[110]
September 19 Third Winchester, Virginia Confederate Army of the Valley, Union Army of the Shenandoah Confederate 3,610, Union 5,020[111]
September 19 Cabin Creek, Indian Territory Confederate cavalry, Union garrison unknown[112]
September 21–22 Fisher's Hill, Virginia Confederate Army of the Valley, Union Army of the Shenandoah Confederate 1,235, Union 528[113]
September 26–28 Pilot Knob, Missouri Confederate Army of Missouri, Union Missouri State Militia and volunteer troops Confederate 1,500, Union 73[114]
September 27 Fort Davidson, Missouri Confederate Army of Missouri, Union garrison Confederate 1,500, Union 183[115]
September 29–30 Chaffin's Farm, Virginia Union Army of the James, Confederate II Corps, Army of Northern Virginia Confederate 1,300, Union 2,869[116]
October 2 Pebbles' Farm, Virginia Confederate Third Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, Union V Corps, Army of the Potomac Confderate 1,300, Union 2,869[117]
October 3 Big Shanty, Georgia Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union garrison Confederate none, Union 175 (captured)[118]
October 5 Allatoona, Georgia Confederate division from Army of Tennessee, Union garrison from XV Corps Confederate 799, Union 706[119]
October 7 Darbytown and New Market Roads, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the Potomac Confederate 700, Union 458[120]
October 9 Tom's Brook, Virginia Confederate cavalry from the Army of the Valley, Union cavalry from the Army of the Shenandoah Confederate 350, Union 57[121]
October 13 Darbytown Road, Virginia Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, Union X Corps Confederate 50, Union 437[122]
October 15 Glasgow, Missouri Confederate Army of Missouri, Union garrison Confederate 50, Union 400[123]
October 19 Cedar Creek, Virginia Confederate Army of the Valley, Union Army of the Shenandoah Confederate 2,910, Union 5,672[124]
October 19 Second Lexington, Missouri Confederate Army of Missouri, Union detachment of Army of the Border Unknown[125]
October 21 Little Blue River, Missouri Confederate Army of Missouri, Union detachment of Army of the Border Unknown[126]
October 21 – 22 Second Independence, Missouri Confederate Army of the Missouri, Union Army of the Border Confederate approximately 140, Union unknown[127]
October 22 – 23 Byram's Ford, Missouri Confederate Army of Missouri, Union Army of the Border Unknown[128]
October 23 Westport, Missouri Confederate Army of Missouri, Union Army of the Border Confederate 1,500, Union 1,500[129]
October 25 Mine Creek, Kansas Confederate Army of Missouri, Union Army of the Border Confederate 800, Union 150[130]
October 25 Marmiton River, Missouri Confederate Army of Missouri, Union cavalry from Army of the Border Unknown[131]
October 26 – 29 Decatur, Alabama Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union garrison and other troops Confederate 200, Union 155[132]
October 27 – 28 Fair Oaks and Darbytown Road, Virginia Confederate detachments from Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the James Confederate less than 100, Union 1,603[133]
October 27 – 28 Boydton Plank Road, Virginia Confederate Third Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, Union Army of the Potomac Confederate 1,300, Union 1,758[134]
October 28 Second Newtonia, Missouri Cavalry from Union Army of the Border and Confederate Army of Missouri Confederate 250, Union 400[135]
November 4 – 5 Johnsonville, Tennessee Confederate Forrest's Cavalry Corps, Union garrison unknown[136]
November 11 – 14 Bull's Gap, Tennessee Confederate Department of Southwest Virginia, Union garrison Confederate 100, Union 24 (including 300 prisoners)[137]
November 22 Griswoldville, Georgia Confederate militia, Union Grand Army of the West Confederate 650, Union 62[138]
November 24 – 29 Columbia, Tennessee Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union IV Corps and XXIII Corps unknown[139]
November 28 Buck Head Creek, Georgia Cavalry from Confederate Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida and Union Grand Army of the West Confederate 600, Union 46[140]
November 29 Sand Creek, Colorado Union 1st Colorado Cavalry and 3rd Colorado Cavalry, Southern Cheyenne and Southern Arapaho Union 48, Southern Cheyenne and Southern Arapaho 150[141]
November 29 Spring Hill, Tennessee Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union IV Corps and XXIII Corps Confederates 500, Union 350[142]
November 30 Second Franklin, Tennessee Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union IV Corps and XXIII Corps Confederate 7,300, Union 2,655[143]
December 4 LaVergne, Tennessee Confederate Forrest's Cavalry Corps, Union garrison Confederate none, Union 150 (all captured)[144]
December 4 Overall Creek, Tennessee Detachments of Confederate Army of Tennessee and Union Department of the Cumberland Confederate 86, Union unknown[145]
December 5–7 Third Murfreesboro, Tennessee Confederate detachment from Army of Tennessee, Union garrison Confederate 214, Union 208[146]
December 15 Fort McAllister Confederate Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida and Union Grand Army of the West Confederate 230, Union 134[147]
December 15–16 Nashville, Tennessee Confederate Army of Tennessee, Union Army of the Cumberland Confederate 6,500, Union 3,061[148]
December 17–18 Marion, Virginia Confederate Department of Southwest Virginia, Union cavalry 300 total[149]
December 20–21 Second Saltville, Virginia Confederate Department of Southwest Virginia, Union cavalry unknown[150]
December 24 Richland Creek, Tennessee Confederate Forrest's Cavalry Corps, Union cavalry, Army of the Cumberland Confederate 6, Union unknown[151]
December 24–27 Fort Fisher I, North Carolina Confederate Cape Fear District, Department of North Carolina, Union Fort Fisher Expeditionary Force, Army of the James Confederate 261, Union 59[152]
December 25 Pulaski, Tennessee Confederate Forrest's Cavalry Corps, Union cavalry, Army of the Cumberland unknown[153]
December 26 Sugar Creek, Tennessee Confederate Forrest's Cavalry Corps, Union cavalry, Army of the Cumberland Confederate unknown, Union 162[154]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Symonds, pp. 76, 79; Trudeau, pp. 18, 240.
  2. ^ Symonds, pp. 81, 85; Trudeau, p. 341.
  3. ^ Symonds, p. 87.
  4. ^ Symonds, p. 83.
  5. ^ Kennedy, pp. 298–301.
  6. ^ Kennedy, pp. 301–303; Symonds, p. 89.
  7. ^ Kennedy, pp. 313, 323.
  8. ^ Symonds, pp. 91–93.
  9. ^ Sword, pp. 269–270.
  10. ^ Sword, pp. 281, 425–426.
  11. ^ Josephy, pp. 165, 188, 201–209.
  12. ^ Kennedy, p. 250.
  13. ^ Kennedy, p. 261.
  14. ^ Kennedy, p. 251.
  15. ^ Trinque, p. 88.
  16. ^ Kennedy, p. 221.
  17. ^ Kennedy, p. 261.
  18. ^ Kennedy, pp. 263–264.
  19. ^ Kennedy, pp. 261–262.
  20. ^ Kennedy, p. 262.
  21. ^ Kennedy, p. 260.
  22. ^ Kennedy, p. 267.
  23. ^ "Battle of Laredo, Texas". History. Civil War Talk. Retrieved April 9, 2013. 
  24. ^ Parrish, p. 330.
  25. ^ Kennedy, p. 275.
  26. ^ Kennedy, p. 273.
  27. ^ Parrish, pp. 338–339.
  28. ^ Brooksher, p. 104.
  29. ^ Brooksher, p. 135.
  30. ^ Kennedy, p. 273.
  31. ^ Kennedy, p. 271.
  32. ^ Kennedy, pp. 275–276.
  33. ^ Kennedy, p. 277.
  34. ^ Kennedy, pp. 273–274.
  35. ^ Kennedy, p. 272.
  36. ^ Kennedy, p. 274.
  37. ^ Kennedy, pp. 274–275.
  38. ^ Kennedy, p. 277.
  39. ^ Trudeau, p. 341.
  40. ^ Kennedy, p. 278.
  41. ^ Kennedy, pp. 326–328.
  42. ^ Trudeau, p. 341.
  43. ^ Kennedy, p. 278.
  44. ^ Kennedy, pp. 296–297.
  45. ^ Kennedy, p. 279.
  46. ^ Kennedy, pp. 297–298.
  47. ^ Kennedy, pp. 286–287.
  48. ^ Kennedy, p. 279.
  49. ^ Kennedy, pp. 329–331.
  50. ^ Knight, p. 216.
  51. ^ Kennedy, p. 272.
  52. ^ Kennedy, p. 331.
  53. ^ Kennedy, p. 272.
  54. ^ Kennedy, p. 280.
  55. ^ Trudeau, p. 341.
  56. ^ Kennedy, p. 290.
  57. ^ Kennedy, pp. 332–335.
  58. ^ Kennedy, pp. 332–335.
  59. ^ Kennedy, p. 290.
  60. ^ Kennedy, pp. 332–335.
  61. ^ Trudeau, p. 341.
  62. ^ Kennedy, p. 291.
  63. ^ Trudeau, p. 341.
  64. ^ Kennedy, pp. 301–303.
  65. ^ Kennedy, p. 275.
  66. ^ Kennedy, p. 352.
  67. ^ Kennedy, pp. 335–336.
  68. ^ Kennedy, pp. 344–347.
  69. ^ Kennedy, pp. 294–295.
  70. ^ Kennedy, p. 344.
  71. ^ Kennedy, pp. 352–353.
  72. ^ Kennedy, p. 304.
  73. ^ Kennedy, pp. 353–354.
  74. ^ Kennedy, p. 336.
  75. ^ Kennedy, p. 295.
  76. ^ Kennedy, p. 355.
  77. ^ Kennedy, pp. 336–339.
  78. ^ Kennedy, p. 354.
  79. ^ Kennedy, pp. 354–355.
  80. ^ Cooling, pp. 79–81.
  81. ^ Kennedy, pp. 308–309.
  82. ^ Stinson, p. 7.
  83. ^ Kennedy, pp. 347–350.
  84. ^ Kennedy, p. 309.
  85. ^ Kennedy, p. 309.
  86. ^ Kennedy, pp. 339–340.
  87. ^ Kennedy, p. 340.
  88. ^ Kennedy, pp. 310–312.
  89. ^ Kennedy, p. 355.
  90. ^ Kennedy, p. 341.
  91. ^ Kennedy, p. 351.
  92. ^ Kennedy, pp. 355–356.
  93. ^ Kennedy, p. 312.
  94. ^ Kennedy, pp. 374–376.
  95. ^ Kennedy, p. 341.
  96. ^ Kennedy, p. 313.
  97. ^ "The US Army and the Sioux - Part 2: Battle of the Badlands". National Park Service. Retrieved 2012-11-17. 
  98. ^ Kennedy, pp. 356–357.
  99. ^ Kennedy, pp. 341–342.
  100. ^ Kennedy, pp. 313–314.
  101. ^ Kennedy, pp. 357–360.
  102. ^ Kennedy, p. 342.
  103. ^ Kennedy, p. 314.
  104. ^ Kennedy, p. 350.
  105. ^ Kennedy, pp. 360–362.
  106. ^ Kennedy, p. 314.
  107. ^ Kennedy, pp. 362–363.
  108. ^ Kennedy, pp. 364–368.
  109. ^ Kennedy, pp. 342–343.
  110. ^ Kennedy, p. 315.
  111. ^ Kennedy, pp. 315–316.
  112. ^ Josephy, p. 377.
  113. ^ Kennedy, pp. 316–318.
  114. ^ Josephy, p. 379.
  115. ^ Josephy, pp. 379–380.
  116. ^ Kennedy, p. 368.
  117. ^ Kennedy, p. 368.
  118. ^ Sword, p. 54.
  119. ^ Sword, pp. 54–56.
  120. ^ Kennedy, p. 369.
  121. ^ Kennedy, p. 319.
  122. ^ Kennedy, p. 369.
  123. ^ Kennedy, p. 382.
  124. ^ Kennedy, p. 323.
  125. ^ Kennedy, p. 382.
  126. ^ Kennedy, p. 383.
  127. ^ Kennedy, p. 383.
  128. ^ Kennedy, p. 383.
  129. ^ Kennedy, p. 384.
  130. ^ Josephy, p. 384.
  131. ^ Kennedy, p. 385.
  132. ^ Sword, pp. 64–65.
  133. ^ Kennedy, p. 372.
  134. ^ Kennedy, p. 371.
  135. ^ Kennedy, p. 386.
  136. ^ Kennedy, p. 389.
  137. ^ Kennedy, p. 387.
  138. ^ Kennedy, p. 399.
  139. ^ Kennedy, p. 392.
  140. ^ Kennedy, pp. 399–400.
  141. ^ Kennedy, p. 398.
  142. ^ Kennedy, p. 395.
  143. ^ Sword, pp. 269–270.
  144. ^ Sword, p. 283.
  145. ^ Sheppard, p. 212.
  146. ^ Sword, p. 298.
  147. ^ Kennedy, pp. 400–401.
  148. ^ Kennedy, pp. 396–397.
  149. ^ Kennedy, p. 388.
  150. ^ Kennedy, p. 388.
  151. ^ Sword, p. 416.
  152. ^ Fonvielle, p. 178
  153. ^ Sword, pp. 417–418.
  154. ^ Sword, p. 419.

References[edit]

  • Brooksher, William Riley. War Along the Bayous: The 1864 Red River Campaign in Louisiana. Washington, D.C.: Brassey's, 1998. ISBN 1-57488-139-6.
  • Cooling, B. F. Jubal Early's Raid on Washington 1864. Baltimore, Maryland: The Nautical & Aviation Publishing Company of America, Inc., 1989. ISBN 0-933852-86-X.
  • Fonvielle, Jr., Chris E. The Wilmington Campaign: Last Rays of Departing Hope. Campbell, California: Savas Publishing Company, 1997. ISBN 1-882810-09-0.
  • Josephy, Jr., Alvin M. The Civil War in the American West. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1992. ISBN 0-394-56482-0.
  • Kennedy, Frances H. The Civil War Battlefield Guide. New York: Houghton Miflin, 1998. ISBN 0-395-74012-6.
  • Knight, Charles R. Valley Thunder: The Battle of New Market and the Opening of the Shenandoah Valley Campaign, May 1864. New York: Savas Beatie, 2010. ISBN 978-1-932714-80-7.
  • Parrish, T. Michael. Richard Taylor: Soldier Prince of Dixie. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: University of North Carolina Press, 1992. ISBN 0-8078-2032-6.
  • Sheppard, Jonathan C. By the Noble and Daring of Her Sons: The Florida Brigade of the Army of Tennessee. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: University of Alabama Press, 2012. ISBN 978-0-8173-1707-2.
  • Stinson, Byron. "Hot Work in Mississippi: The Battle of Tupelo", in Civil War Times Illustrated, Vol. XI, no. 4 (July 1972), pp. 4–9, 46–48. ISSN 0009-8094
  • Sword, Wiley. The Confederacy's Last Hurrah: Spring Hill, Franklin, & Nashville. Lawrence, Kansas: University Press of Kansas, 1992. ISBN 0-7006-0650-5.
  • Symonds, Craig L. A Battlefield Atlas of the Civil War. Annapolis, Maryland: The Nautical and Aviation Publishing Company of America, 1983. ISBN 0-933852-40-1.
  • Trinque, Bruce A. "Rebels Across the River", in America's Civil War, Volume 7, number 4 (September 1994), pp. 38–45, 88. ISSN 1046-2899.
  • Trudeau, Noah Andre. Bloody Roads South: The Wilderness to Cold Harbor. Boston, Massachusetts: Little, Brown and Company, 1989. ISBN 0-316-85326-7.