Trouble Me

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"Trouble Me"
Trouble Me.jpg
Standard artwork (7-inch vinyl release pictured)
Single by 10,000 Maniacs
from the album Blind Man's Zoo
Released1989
Format
RecordedDreamland Recording Studio, West Hurley, New York, November 1988 – March 1989
GenreAlternative rock
Length3:08
LabelElektra
Songwriter(s)Dennis Drew
Natalie Merchant
Producer(s)Peter Asher
10,000 Maniacs singles chronology
"What's the Matter Here"
(1988)
"Trouble Me"
(1989)
""Eat for Two"
(1989)

"Trouble Me" is a song by the American alternative rock group 10,000 Maniacs and the first single from their 1989 album Blind Man's Zoo. The single was co-written by the band's then-lead singer, Natalie Merchant, as dedication to her father, Anthony Merchant. "Trouble Me" charted in the both United States and the United Kingdom, becoming a hit for the band. A live version with lead vocalist Mary Ramsey was also included on their 2016 album Playing Favorites.

Background and production[edit]

"Trouble Me", co-written by Dennis Drew and Natalie Merchant, was the first released single of the album. The song was written for Merchant's father, Anthony, who was hospitalized at the time.[1][2] Gospel singer Jevetta Steele provided the background vocals for the song.[3]

Music video[edit]

A music video for "Trouble Me" was produced, containing outdoor scenes. Merchant caught a common cold during the filming.[1] It is included in the VHS release 10,000 Maniacs: Time Capsule, Filmed 1982–1990,[4] later re-released on DVD as 10,000 Maniacs: Time Capsule, Filmed 1982–1993.

In the music video, while she performs the song in various scenes, Merchant takes an elderly woman on a bicycle to a place where her friends surprise her and then do activities. In the end, Merchant and the elderly woman ride on a bicycle to a shoreline.

Reception[edit]

Music critic Anthony DeCurtis wrote that the track "Trouble Me" was "the most uplifting" and "the antidote" to the remainder of the album, which DeCurtis considered "a starkly pessimistic statement."[1] Chris Willman of Los Angeles Times reviewed the band's song performance at the 1989 Santa Barbara Bowl concert, calling it "honey in the soothing."[5] Joseph Pryweller of Virginia's Daily Press reviewed the band's song performance at a 1989 Colonial Williamsburg concert, saying that the performance resembled songs from the band's previous album, In My Tribe, and "lacked special character."[6]

Charts[edit]

In the Billboard charts, "Trouble Me" reached number 20 in the Mainstream Rock chart on the week ending July 8, 1989;[7] number three in the Modern Rock Tracks chart on the week ending June 10;[8] number 44 in the Hot 100 chart on the week ending August 12;[9] and number seven in the Adult Contemporary chart on the week ending August 19, 1989.[10] "Trouble Me" reached number 77 in the UK Singles Chart for the week ending June 17, 1989.[11][12]

Chart (1989) Peak
position
Australian Singles Chart[13] 102
UK Singles Chart[12] 77
US Billboard Hot 100[9] 44
US Billboard Adult Contemporary[10] 7
US Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks[7] 20
US Billboard Modern Rock Tracks[8] 3

In popular culture[edit]

The song is featured in the Dead of Summer episode, "Barney Rubble Eyes" (season 1, episode 2).[14][15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c DeCurtis, Anthony (1999). Rocking My Life Away: Writing About Music and Other Matters. pp. 162–164. ISBN 0-8223-2419-9.
  2. ^ Contemporary Musicians: Profiles of the People in Music, edited by Michael LaBlanc. Vol. 3.
  3. ^ White, Timothy (July 1989). "Spins: '10,000 Maniacs, Blind Man's Zoo (Elektra)'". Spin. pp. 107, 109. Retrieved February 19, 2017.
  4. ^ "10,000 Maniacs: Time Capsule 1982–1990 (1990)". Video Source Book. Thomson Gale. 2007. p. 2900.
  5. ^ Willman, Chris (August 15, 1989). "Pop Review: 10,000 Maniacs Visit Southland". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved December 31, 2018.
  6. ^ Pryweller, Joseph (December 9, 1989). "10,000 Maniacs Show a Split Personality". Daily Press. Virginia. Retrieved December 31, 2018.
  7. ^ a b "10,000 Maniacs – Chart History (Mainstream Rock Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved February 18, 2017.
  8. ^ a b "10,000 Maniacs – Chart History (". Billboard. Retrieved February 18, 2017.
  9. ^ a b "10,000 Maniacs – Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved February 18, 2017.
  10. ^ a b "10,000 Maniacs – Chart History (Adult Contemporary)". Billboard. Retrieved February 18, 2017.
  11. ^ "Official Singles Chart Top 100 (11 June 1989 - 17 June 1989)". Official Charts. The Official UK Charts Company. Retrieved February 18, 2017.
  12. ^ a b "10,000 Maniacs". Official Charts. The Official UK Charts Company. Retrieved February 18, 2017.
  13. ^ "Response from ARIA re: chart inquiry, received May 24, 2016". Imgur.com. Retrieved August 11, 2017.
  14. ^ Berkowitz, Alyssa (July 7, 2016). "Dead of Summer Review: 'Barney Rubble Eyes'". The Workprint. Retrieved December 31, 2018.
  15. ^ Trammell, Mark (July 6, 2016). "Dead of Summer: 'Barney Rubble Eyes' Review (Season 1, Episode 2)". TV Equals. Retrieved December 31, 2018.