Troy Cassar-Daley

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Troy Cassar-Daley
TroyCassar.jpg
Troy Cassar-Daley in concert
Background information
Born (1969-05-18) 18 May 1969 (age 49)
Surry Hills, New South Wales, Australia
GenresCountry, Country rock,
InstrumentsVocals, Guitar, harmonica
Years active1990–present
LabelsSony Music, Liberation Music
Associated actsAdam Brand, Lee Kernaghan, Gina Jeffreys website = Troy Cassar-Daley website
Troy is married to TV presenter and radio DJ Laurel Edwards, with whom he has two children, Clay and Gem.[1][2]

Troy Cassar-Daley (born 18 May 1969) is a country musician from New South Wales, Australia.

Troy Cassar-Daley is regarded as one of Australian country music’s finest singer/songwriters. He is a hugely successful artist, much adored by country music fans across Australia. Troy is also well known for his generosity and is well respected by his peers and the greater music industry. All of this is reflected on a mainstream level by the many industry awarded accolades for his work as a successful recording artist.

Cassar-Daley has released 11 studio albums over 30 years. Throughout this time he has been awarded numerous accolades including 4 ARIA’s, 33 Golden Guitars, 9 Deadlys (Australian Indigenous Artist Awards), 4 CMAA Entertainer of the Year awards plus 2 NIMA's. In 2017 Troy was the 50th inductee into the prestigious Australian Roll of Renown.[3]

Early life and career[edit]

Cassar-Daley was born in the Sydney suburb of Grafton to a Maltese-Australian father and an Aboriginal mother.[4] At a very young age, he moved with his mother to Grafton in north-eastern New South Wales. At eleven, Troy went to the Tamworth Country Music Festival and returned the next year to busk on the streets.[5] At 16 he and his band, Little Eagle, were touring the North Coast of New South Wales and he made the top 10 in Tamworth's Star Maker quest. He won the 1986 "Search for a Star" competition and then toured with Brian Young for seven months in which he began to develop his songwriting skills. After returning home he replaced James Blundell as leader of country music band The Blue Heeler Band.

Later career[edit]

The first single "Dream Out Loud" was released on 24 October 1994[6] by Sony Music and reached number-one on the Australian country music charts. The album was released in January 1995 and Troy won the 1995 ARIA Award for Best Country Record. At the 1996 Country Music Awards, in Tamworth, Troy won Best Male Vocalist. He also made a cameo appearance in the motion picture Race the Sun in which he performed a song in a bar scene.

In June that year Troy was part of the Australian Country Music Showcase in Nashville. The Showcase included Lee Kernaghan, Gina Jeffreys and Tommy Emmanuel. As a result, Troy returned to the States to record his new album True Believer with Steve Dorff.

Troy Cassar-Daley partnered up with Kate Ritchie for the singing competition It Takes Two aired on Seven Network in 2006. In May 2007 Troy re-appeared on the same show,[7] this time partnered with Krystal Forscutt,[8] a former contestant on Network Ten's Big Brother program. The same year, Troy was featured in Wiggles music videos for the songs "Old Dan Tucker" and "Turkey in the Straw".

Cassar-Daley performed the national anthem at the 2003 NRL grand final.

Cassar-Daley with Kasey Chambers and Shane Nicholson played together at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on 14 March 2009 for Sound Relief which was a proposed multi-venue rock music concert in support of relief for the Victorian Bushfire Crisis.[9][10] The event was held simultaneously with another concert taking place at the Sydney Cricket Ground.[9] All the proceeds from the Melbourne Concert went to the Red Cross Victorian Bushfire Relief Appeal.[9][10][11]

Personal life[edit]

Troy is married to radio and television presenter Laurel Edwards with whom he has two children, Clay and Jem.[1][2].

Discography[edit]

Studio albums[edit]

Title Details Peak positions Certifications
(sales thresholds)
AUS
[12]
Beyond the Dancing -
True Believer
  • Release date: January 1997
  • Label: Columbia (486872 2)
  • Formats: CD, Cassette
53 [13]
Big River
  • Release date: August 1999
  • Label: Columbia (495236 2)
  • Formats: CD, Cassette
49
Long Way Home
  • Release date: 27 May 2002
  • Label: Essence Records/EMI Music (5399092)
  • Formats: CD, Cassette
77 [16]
Borrowed & Blue
  • Release date: 19 April 2004
  • Label: Essence Records/EMI Music (5979432)
  • Formats: CD, Cassette
89[18]
Brighter Day
  • Release date: 10 October 2005
  • Label: Essence Records/EMI Music (3427112)
  • Formats: CD, Cassette
46
I Love This Place 34
Home
  • Release date: 2 March 2012
  • Label: Liberation Records (LMCD0163)
  • Formats: CD/DVD, DD
9
The Great Country Songbook (with Adam Harvey) 2
Freedom Ride
  • Release date: 13 March 2015
  • Label: Liberation Records (LMCD0251)
  • Formats: CD, DD
4
Things I Carry Around
  • Release date: 26 August 2016
  • Label: Liberation Records (LMCD0300)
  • Formats: CD, DD
5

Live albums[edit]

Title Details Peak positions Certifications
(sales thresholds)
AUS Top 40 Music DVD
[12]
Troy Cassar-Daley Live
  • Release date: 22 October 2010
  • Label: Liberation Music (LMCD0117)/(LIBDVD1111)
  • Formats: CD, DVD, DD
20[20]
Greatest Hits Live -

Compilation albums[edit]

Title Details Peak positions Certifications
(sales thresholds)
AUS
[12]
Almost Home
  • Release date: 23 January 2006
  • Label: Rajon Records (CDR0543)
  • Formats: CD, Cassette
-
Born to Survive (The Best of)
  • Release date: July 2007
  • Label: EMI Music (5099 2 425012 2)
  • Formats: CD, DD
18
The Essential Troy Cassar-Daley
  • Release date: 22 April 2011[24]
  • Label: Sony (886977644320)
  • Formats: CD
-
Lost & Found
  • Release date: 28 March 2018[25]
  • Label: Bloodlines (9341004057951)
  • Formats: Download, Streaming
-
Greatest Hits
  • Release date: 19 October 2018[26]
  • Label: Bloodlines (BLOOD33)
  • Formats: CD, vinyl, download, streaming
7
[27]

Awards and nominations[edit]

APRA Awards[edit]

Cassar-Daley had been nominated for 10 awards, winning 2 at the APRA Awards (Australia).[28][29][30][31]

Year Nominee / work Award Result
1998 "Little Things" Most Performed Country Work Nominated
1999 "Biggest Disappointment" Most Performed Country Work Nominated
2000 "They Don't Make 'Em Like That Anymore" Most Performed Country Work Nominated
2004 "Wish I Was a Train" (with Paul Kelly) Most Performed Country Work Nominated
2005 "Factory Man" Most Performed Country Work Nominated
2007 "Going Back Home" Most Performed Country Work Nominated
2008 "Everything's Going to be Alright" Country Work of the Year Won
2010 "Big Big Love" Song of the Year Nominated
2010 "Big Big Love" Country Work of the Year Won
2013 "Country Is" Most Performed Country Work Nominated

ARIA Awards[edit]

Cassar-Daley had been nominated for 12 awards, winning 4 at the ARIA Music Awards[32]

Year Nominee / work Award Result
1995 Beyond the Dancing ARIA Award for Best Country Album Won
1997 "True Believers" Best Country Album Nominated
1998 True Believer Best Country Album Nominated
2000 Big River Best Country Album Won
2002 Long Way Home Best Country Album Nominated
2004 Borrowed & Blue Best Country Album Nominated
2006 Brighter Day Best Country Album Won
2009 I Love This Place Best Country Album Won
2011 Troy Cassar-Daley Live Best Country Album Nominated
2012 Home Best Country Album Nominated
2013 The Great Country Songbook (with Adam Harvey) Best Country Album Nominated
2015 Freedom Ride Best Country Album Nominated

CMA Awards[edit]

The Country Music Awards of Australia is an annual awards night held in January during the Tamworth Country Music Festival, celebrating recording excellence in the Australian country music industry. Csasar-Daley has won 34 awards; third most behind Slim Dusty and Lee Kernaghan.[33][34]

Year Nominee / work Award Result
1996 "End of the Road" Male Vocalist of the Year Won
1998 True Believer Album of the Year Won
"Little Things" Male Vocalist of the Year Won
"Little Things" Video of the Year Won
2000 "They Don't Make 'Em Like That Anymore" Male Vocalist of the Year Won
"They Don't Make 'Em Like That Anymore" ARPA Song of the Year Won
2003 "Born to Survive" Male Vocalist of the Year Won
"Wish I Was a Train" (with Paul Kelly) Vocal Collaboration of the Year Won
"Born to Survive" ARPA Song of the Year Won
2006 "Lonesome But Free" Male Vocalist of the Year Won
"Bird On A Wire" (with Jimmy Barnes) Vocal Collaboration of the Year Won
"Yellow Belly" Instrumental of the Year Won
"Lonesome But Free" ARPA Song of the Year Won
2008 "Everything’s Going To Be Alright" Male Vocalist of the Year Won
2010 I Love This Place Male Vocalist of the Year Won
I Love This Place Album of the Year Won
"Ain’t Gonna Change for You" (with The McClymonts) Vocal Collaboration of the Year Won
"Chasin' Rodeo" Heritage Song of the Year Won
"Big Big Love" APRA Song of the Year Won
"Big Big Love" Single of the Year Won
2011 "Sacred Bones" Toyota Heritage Song of the Year Won
2013 Home Male Vocalist of the Year Won
Home Album of the Year Won
"Country Is" Single of the Year Won
"Home" APRA Song of the Year Won
2015 "My Country My Land" (with Dean Perrett) Vocal Collaboration of the Year Won
2016 Freedom Ride Album of the Year Won
"Freedom Ride" Male Vocalist of the Year Won
"Freedom Ride" Toyota Heritage Song of the Year Won
"Freedom Ride" APRA Song of the Year Won
"Take a Walk in My Country" Single of the Year Won
Troy Cassar-Daley" CMAA Producer of the Year Won
2017 Things I Carry Round Album of the Year Won
2019 "Shadows on the Hill" Heritage Song of the Year Won

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b ENOUGH ROPE with Andrew Denton – episode 109: Troy Cassar-Daley (26/06/2006)
  2. ^ a b Welcome to LaurelEdwards.com
  3. ^ "Roll of Renown". TCMF. Retrieved 21 August 2018.
  4. ^ "Troy Cassar-Daley". Talking Heads. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 4 May 2009. Retrieved 12 July 2011.
  5. ^ Troy Cassar-Daley – It Takes Two Archived 4 July 2007 at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ "New Release Summary – Product Available from: 24/10/94 (from The ARIA Report Issue No. 245)". Imgur.com. Retrieved 19 September 2016.
  7. ^ It Takes Two official website Archived 15 June 2006 at the Wayback Machine
  8. ^ Krystal Forscutt – It Takes Two Archived 15 July 2007 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ a b c Brumby, John (24 February 2009). "Artists Unite For 'Sound Relief' Bushfire Benefit – Premier of Victoria, Australia". Premier of Victoria. Retrieved 25 February 2009.
  10. ^ a b Mitchell, Geraldine (24 February 2009). "Coldplay, Kings of Leon to headline bushfire relief concerts". Herald Sun. The Herald and Weekly Times Ltd. Archived from the original on 25 February 2009. Retrieved 25 February 2009.
  11. ^ "Latest News". Sound Relief. Archived from the original on 27 February 2009. Retrieved 25 February 2009.
  12. ^ a b c "australian-charts.com - Troy Cassar-Daley Australian charts portal". australian-charts.com. Retrieved 31 July 2018.
  13. ^ "ARIA Report Issue 816" (PDF). ARIA. 17 October 2005. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  14. ^ "ARIA Charts - Accreditations - 1998 Albums". ARIA. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  15. ^ "ARIA Charts - Accreditations - 2006 Albums". ARIA. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  16. ^ "ARIA Report Issue 640" (PDF). 5 June 2002. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  17. ^ "ARIA Charts - Accreditations - 2007 Albums". ARIA. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  18. ^ "ARIA Report Issue 640" (PDF). 26 April 2004. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  19. ^ "ARIA Charts - Accreditations - 2014 Albums". ARIA. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  20. ^ "ARIA Report Issue 1079" (PDF). ARIA Report Issue 1079. 8 November 2010. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  21. ^ "ARIA Charts - Accreditations - 2013 DVD". ARIA. Retrieved 16 September 2018.
  22. ^ "Greatest Hits Live". JBHiFi. Retrieved 23 August 2018.
  23. ^ "ARIA Charts - Accreditations - 2008 Albums". ARIA. Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  24. ^ "Troy Cassar Daley The Essential". CD online. Retrieved 23 August 2018.
  25. ^ "Lost & Found by Troy Cassar-Daley". iTunes Australia. Retrieved 16 September 2018.
  26. ^ "Troy Cassar-Daley Greatest Hits". JB Hi-Fi. Retrieved 13 September 2018.
  27. ^ "ARIA Australian Top 50 Albums". Australian Recording Industry Association. 29 October 2018. Retrieved 27 October 2018.
  28. ^ "2008 Winners – APRA Music Awards". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA) | Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society (AMCOS). Retrieved 28 April 2010.
  29. ^ "2010 Winners – APRA Music Awards". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 24 June 2010.
  30. ^ "Nominations for Song of the Year – 2010". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 27 May 2010.
  31. ^ "Country Work of the Year". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA) | Australasian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society (AMCOS). 2013. Retrieved 19 March 2015.
  32. ^ "ARIA Award Search Troy Cassar-Daley". Retrieved 4 August 2018.
  33. ^ "TOYOTA GOLDEN GUITAR AWARDS". COUNTRY. 17 November 2014. Retrieved 21 August 2018.
  34. ^ "Golden Guitar winners tally". History of Country Music. Retrieved 21 August 2018.