Trysil

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Trysil kommune
View of Innbygda and a large skiing facility
View of Innbygda and a large skiing facility
Coat of arms of Trysil kommune
Official logo of Trysil kommune
Trysil within Innlandet
Trysil within Innlandet
Coordinates: 61°18′36″N 12°18′54″E / 61.31000°N 12.31500°E / 61.31000; 12.31500Coordinates: 61°18′36″N 12°18′54″E / 61.31000°N 12.31500°E / 61.31000; 12.31500
CountryNorway
CountyInnlandet
DistrictØsterdalen
Established1 January 1838
Administrative centreInnbygda
Government
 • Mayor (2015)Erik Sletten (Sp)
Area
 • Total3,014.42 km2 (1,163.87 sq mi)
 • Land2,940.77 km2 (1,135.44 sq mi)
 • Water73.65 km2 (28.44 sq mi)  2.4%
 • Rank#15 in Norway
Population
 (2021)
 • Total6,580
 • Rank#150 in Norway
 • Density2.2/km2 (6/sq mi)
 • Change (10 years)
Decrease −2.6%
Demonym(s)Trysling[1]
Official language
 • Norwegian formBokmål
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 codeNO-3421
WebsiteOfficial website

Trysil is a municipality in Innlandet county, Norway. It is located in the traditional district of Østerdalen. The administrative centre of the municipality is the village of Innbygda. Other villages in the municipality include Nybergsund, Østby, and Tørberget.[3]

The 3,014-square-kilometre (1,164 sq mi) municipality is the 15th largest by area out of the 356 municipalities in Norway. Trysil is the 150th most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 6,580. The municipality's population density is 2.2 inhabitants per square kilometre (5.7/sq mi) and its population has decreased by 2.6% over the previous 10-year period.[4][5]

General information[edit]

On 1 January 1838, the prestegjeld of Trysil was established as a civil municipality (see formannskapsdistrikt law). In 1880, the Osneset area of western Trysil (population: 302) was transferred to the neighboring municipality of Åmot. On 1 January 1911, the northern part of the municipality (population: 291) was separated to join the new Engerdal Municipality.[6] There were also some minor boundary adjustments west of the lake Osensjøen in 1943 and again in 1964 when some areas were transferred from Elverum Municipality to Trysil.[3]

Name[edit]

The municipality (originally the parish) is probably named after the old Trysil farm which was most likely the original name of the current Prestgarden ("the vicarage"), where the first Trysil Church was built. The meaning of the first element is unknown (maybe an old river name) and the last element is sil which means "quiet stretch of a river". Prior to 1906, the name was spelled "Tryssil".[3][7]

Coat of arms[edit]

The coat of arms was granted on 21 October 1991. The arms show two white or silver ski poles on a blue background. It is meant to symbolize Trysil in the past, present, and future since skiing has long been an important way of transportation over the years (including the legend of Trysil-Knut), but has more recently become a major tourist attraction. The arms were designed by Bjørn Ellefsæter.[8]

Churches[edit]

The Church of Norway has seven parishes (sokn) within the municipality of Trysil. It is part of the Sør-Østerdal prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Hamar.

Churches in Trysil
Parish (sokn) Church name Location of the church Year built
Ljørdalen Ljørdalen Church Ljørdalen 1872
Nordre Trysil Nordre Trysil Church Jordet 2000
Søre Trysil Plassen Church Plassen 1907
Søre Osen Søre Osen Church Søre Osen 1882
Trysil Trysil Church Innbygda 1861
Tørberget Tørberget Church Tørberget 1922
Østby Østby Church Østby 1940

History[edit]

War memorial for the bombardment by German aviators

One of the first-known, organized ski races was held here 22 January 1862.[9] Roland Huntford, author of Two Planks and a Passion, describes this race as, "the first truly modern ski race."[9] The famous Norwegian skier Halvard Morgedal won all the competitions that year. The Trysilgutten ski club, founded in 1861, is one of the world's oldest ski clubs. See also the Kiandra snow shoe club.

The small village of Nybergsund was bombed by German aviators during World War II on 11 April 1940, when King Haakon VII and Crown Prince Olav were there.

Economy[edit]

Farming and logging are traditionally the most important occupations in the municipality, and there are many wood related industries. The Trysilelva river was the last river in Norway with traditional timber floating. There is extensive wildlife, including a large moose population.

Trysilfjellet is the largest winter sports centre in Norway with 65 prepared slopes.

Government[edit]

All municipalities in Norway, including Trysil, are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, unemployment and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads. The municipality is governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elects a mayor.[10] The municipality falls under the Østre Innlandet District Court and the Eidsivating Court of Appeal.

Municipal council[edit]

The municipal council (Kommunestyre) of Trysil is made up of 23 representatives that are elected to four year terms. The party breakdown of the council is as follows:

Trysil Kommunestyre 2020–2023 [11]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)10
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
Total number of members:23
Trysil Kommunestyre 2016–2019 [12][13]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
 Conservative Party (Høyre)6
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
Total number of members:25
Trysil Kommunestyre 2012–2015 [14]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
 Conservative Party (Høyre)6
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:25
Trysil Kommunestyre 2008–2011 [13]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)3
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:25
Trysil Kommunestyre 2004–2007 [13]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)3
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:25
Trysil Kommunestyre 2000–2003 [13]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)12
 Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:25
Trysil Kommunestyre 1996–1999 [15]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)8
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:33
Trysil Kommunestyre 1992–1995 [16]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
 Conservative Party (Høyre)3
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)6
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:33
Trysil Kommunestyre 1988–1991 [17]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)20
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)4
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:33
Trysil Kommunestyre 1984–1987 [18]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)20
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
Total number of members:33
Trysil Kommunestyre 1980–1983 [19]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
 Conservative Party (Høyre)4
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
Total number of members:33
Trysil Kommunestyre 1976–1979 [20]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)17
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)8
 Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
Total number of members:33
Trysil Kommunestyre 1972–1975 [21]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
 Conservative Party (Høyre)1
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)10
 Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:33
Trysil Kommunestyre 1968–1971 [22]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
 Conservative Party (Høyre)1
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)9
 Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)1
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:33
Trysil Kommunestyre 1964–1967 [23]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)2
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)9
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:33
Trysil Herredsstyre 1960–1963 [24]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)16
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)3
 Centre Party (Senterpartiet)10
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:33
Trysil Herredsstyre 1956–1959 [25]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
 Conservative Party (Høyre)2
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)3
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)8
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:33
Trysil Herredsstyre 1952–1955 [26]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)15
 Conservative Party (Høyre)1
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)2
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)4
 Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:24
Trysil Herredsstyre 1948–1951 [27]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
 Conservative Party (Høyre)1
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)3
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)3
 Joint list of the Liberal Party (Venstre) and
the Radical People's Party (Radikale Folkepartiet)
2
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)1
Total number of members:24
Trysil Herredsstyre 1945–1947 [28]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)15
 Communist Party (Kommunistiske Parti)4
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)2
 Joint list of the Liberal Party (Venstre) and
the Radical People's Party (Radikale Folkepartiet)
2
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)1
Total number of members:24
Trysil Herredsstyre 1938–1941* [29]  
Party Name (in Norwegian) Number of
representatives
 Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)15
 Conservative Party (Høyre)1
 Nasjonal Samling Party (Nasjonal Samling)1
 Farmers' Party (Bondepartiet)3
 Common list: Liberal Party and Small Farmholders (Samlingsliste: Venstre og Småbrukere)3
 Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)1
Total number of members:24
Note: Due to the German occupation of Norway during World War II, no elections were held for new municipal councils until after the war ended in 1945.

Mayors[edit]

List of the mayors of Trysil:

  • 1838–1839: Paul Irgens Dybdahl
  • 1839–1841: Arne Arnesen
  • 1841–1843: Jo Jonsen Lunde
  • 1843–1845: Paul D. Gleditsch
  • 1845–1847: Halvor E. Lunde
  • 1847–1853: Ole Nyhuus d.e.
  • 1853–1859: Halvor Strandvold
  • 1859–1863: Ola Nyhuus d.y.
  • 1863–1867: Johan Landgraff
  • 1867: Albert Balchen
  • 1867–1871: Erik Johnsen Kveen
  • 1871–1875: Johan Landgraff
  • 1875–1879: Hans Nysæter
  • 1879–1881: Johan Rønningen (V)
  • 1881–1889: Per Galaasen (V)
  • 1889–1891: Johan Rønningen (V)
  • 1891–1893: Bernhard Holt (V)
  • 1893–1895: Otto Rundfloen (V)
  • 1895–1898: Johan Rønningen (V)
  • 1899–1901: Bernhard Holt (V)
  • 1902–1904: Martin Nyhuus (V)
  • 1905–1919: Halvor Lunde (Arb.dem.)
  • 1920–1922: Kristian Ingmar Moe (Ap)
  • 1923–1925: John G. Østby (V)
  • 1926–1931: August Aastad (Ap)
  • 1932–1934: John G. Østby (V)
  • 1935–1937: August Aastad (Ap)
  • 1938–1940: Harald Løbak (Ap)
  • 1941–1945: Harald Lunde (NS)[30]
  • 1945–1955: Harald Løbak (Ap)
  • 1956–1963: Engebret Sørli (Ap)
  • 1964–1971: Harald Berget (Ap)
  • 1972–1999: Arvid Nyberg[31] (Ap)
  • 1999–2015: Ole Martin Norderhaug (Ap)
  • 2015–present: Erik Sletten (Sp)

Geography[edit]

Trysil is bordered in the north by the municipalities of Engerdal and Rendalen, in the west by Åmot, and in the southwest by Elverum and Våler. The eastern border of the municipality is bordered in the north, east and south by Sweden. The main village in Trysil is Innbygda, which often is referred to as Trysil.

Climate[edit]

Trysil has a subarctic climate (Köppen Dfc) with cold winters and warm summers. Mean temperature in January is −11 °C (12 °F) and 14 °C (57 °F) for July. Precipitation is moderate at 720 millimetres (28 in) annually.[32]

Climate data for Trysil-Vegstasjon, about 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) south of Innbygda (1961-1990) at an elevation of 360 metres (1,180 ft) above sea level
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Daily mean °C (°F) −11.0
(12.2)
−10.0
(14.0)
−5.0
(23.0)
0.5
(32.9)
8.0
(46.4)
13.0
(55.4)
14.0
(57.2)
12.5
(54.5)
7.5
(45.5)
3.0
(37.4)
−4.0
(24.8)
−9.5
(14.9)
1.6
(34.9)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 40
(1.6)
30
(1.2)
30
(1.2)
40
(1.6)
60
(2.4)
85
(3.3)
90
(3.5)
80
(3.1)
90
(3.5)
75
(3.0)
60
(2.4)
40
(1.6)
720
(28.4)
Source: eklima.met.no[32]

Nature[edit]

Trysil is a great place to explore the Norwegian nature and participating in various outdoor activities like guided trips, river fishing, dog sledge driving, elk safari, night photography, stargazing. This includes a mountain at Norway's largest ski resort, which offers many of the country's most widely acclaimed downhill and slalom slopes.

Notable residents[edit]

Number of minorities (1st and 2nd generation) in Trysil by country of origin in 2017[33]
Ancestry Number
 Sweden 180
 Eritrea 60
 Poland 57
 Netherlands 37
 Latvia 28
 Iraq 27
 Denmark 26
 Syria 25
Halldis Moren Vesaas
Hallgeir Brenden, 1950's
  • Axel Smith (1744–1823) a Norwegian priest and topographer
  • Haakon Nyhuus (1866–1913) a Norwegian librarian and encyclopedist
  • Sven Moren (1871–1938) a farmer, poet, playwright, children's writer and politician
  • Olaf L. Olsen (1881–1958) an American legislator and politician
  • Halvor Floden (1884–1956) a schoolteacher, children's writer, novelist, poet and playwright
  • Einar Skjæraasen (1900–1966) an author, poet and political candidate
  • Halldis Moren Vesaas (1907–1995) a Norwegian poet, translator and writer of children's books
  • Sigmund Moren (1913–1996) a philologist, literary critic, theatre critic and children's writer
  • Tormod Haugen (1945–2008) a writer of children's books and translator, winner of the H.C. Andersen prize
  • Jan Axel Blomberg (born 1969) a heavy metal drummer, stage name Hellhammer

Sport[edit]

Sister cities[edit]

Trysil has sister city agreements with the following places::[34]

Media gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Navn på steder og personer: Innbyggjarnamn" (in Norwegian). Språkrådet.
  2. ^ "Forskrift om målvedtak i kommunar og fylkeskommunar" (in Norwegian). Lovdata.no.
  3. ^ a b c Olsen Haugen, Morten, ed. (30 January 2022). "Trysil". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 4 March 2022.
  4. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå (2021). "Table: 06913: Population 1 January and population changes during the calendar year (M)" (in Norwegian).
  5. ^ Statistisk sentralbyrå (2021). "09280: Area of land and fresh water (km²) (M)" (in Norwegian).
  6. ^ Jukvam, Dag (1999). "Historisk oversikt over endringer i kommune- og fylkesinndelingen" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Statistisk sentralbyrå.
  7. ^ Rygh, Oluf (1900). Norske gaardnavne: Hedmarkens amt (in Norwegian) (3 ed.). Kristiania, Norge: W. C. Fabritius & sønners bogtrikkeri. p. 329.
  8. ^ "Civic heraldry of Norway - Norske Kommunevåpen". Heraldry of the World. Retrieved 2 March 2022.
  9. ^ a b "Chronology of Nordic Skiing". Archived from the original on 19 July 2011. Retrieved 28 May 2010.
  10. ^ Hansen, Tore, ed. (12 May 2016). "kommunestyre". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 30 January 2022.
  11. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2019 - Innlandet". Valg Direktoratet. Retrieved 4 March 2022.
  12. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2015 - Hedmark". Valg Direktoratet.
  13. ^ a b c d "Table: 04813: Members of the local councils, by party/electoral list at the Municipal Council election (M)" (in Norwegian). Statistics Norway.
  14. ^ "Tall for Norge: Kommunestyrevalg 2011 - Hedmark". Valg Direktoratet.
  15. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1995" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1996.
  16. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1991" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1993.
  17. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1987" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1988.
  18. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1983" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo-Kongsvinger: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1984.
  19. ^ "Kommunestyrevalget 1979" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1979.
  20. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1975" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1977.
  21. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1972" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1973.
  22. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1967" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1967.
  23. ^ "Kommunevalgene 1963" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1964.
  24. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1959" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1960.
  25. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1955" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1957.
  26. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1951" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1952.
  27. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1947" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1948.
  28. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1945" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1947.
  29. ^ "Kommunevalgene og Ordførervalgene 1937" (PDF) (in Norwegian). Oslo: Statistisk sentralbyrå. 1938.
  30. ^ Lunde, Jon Vegard (1998). Hjemmefronten på Hedmarken og i Østerdalen (in Norwegian). Lunde pressetjeneste. p. 91. ISBN 8299096626.
  31. ^ Øverby, Arve (2013). Mester på hjemmebane: historien om Arvid Nyberg (in Norwegian). Eget forlag. ISBN 9788299944304.
  32. ^ a b "Meteorologisk institutt". Archived from the original on 19 November 2016.
  33. ^ "Immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents". ssb.no. Archived from the original on 2 July 2015. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  34. ^ "Vennskapskommuner" (in Norwegian). Trysil kommune. Archived from the original on 6 October 2011. Retrieved 30 December 2008.

External links[edit]