List of Russian rulers

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Monarchy of Russia
Lesser CoA of the empire of Russia.svg
Nicholas II, 1914.jpg
Nicholas II
Details
Style His Imperial Majesty
First monarch Rurik (as Prince)
Last monarch Nicholas II (as Emperor)
Formation 862
Abolition 15 March 1917 (formally 1 September 1917)
Residence Winter Palace
Appointer Hereditary
Pretender(s) Disputed:
Nicholas Romanov,
Maria Vladimirovna
'List of tsars' redirects here. For other uses, see tsar and tsar (disambiguation).

This is a list of all reigning monarchs in the history of Russia. It includes titles Prince of Novgorod, Grand Prince of Kiev, Grand Prince of Vladimir, Grand Prince of Moscow, Tsar of All Rus', and Emperor of All Russia. The list started with a semi-legendary Prince of Novgorod Rurik sometime in the mid 9th century (862) and ended with the Emperor of All Russia Nicholas II who abdicated in 1917, and was executed with his family in 1918.

The vast territory known today as Russia covers an area that has been known historically by various names, including Rus', Kievan Rus',[1][2] the Grand Duchy of Moscow, the Tsardom of Muscovy and the Russian Empire, and the sovereigns of these many nations and throughout their histories have used likewise as wide a range of titles in their positions as chief magistrates of a country. Some of the earliest titles include Kniaz and Velikiy Kniaz, which mean "Prince" and "Great Prince" respectively but are often rendered as "Duke" and "Grand Duke" in Western literature; then the title of Tsar, meaning "Caesar", which was disputed to be the equal of either a king or emperor; finally culminating in the title of Emperor. The full title of the Russian Emperors, according to Article 59 of the 1906 Russian Constitution, was given as:

Emperor and Autocrat of all the Russias, of Moscow, Kiev, Vladimir, Novgorod, Tsar of Kazan, Tsar of Astrakhan, Tsar of Poland, Tsar of Siberia, Tsar of Chersonesos Taurica, Tsar of Georgia, Lord of Pskov, and Grand Duke of Smolensk, Lithuania, Volhynia, Podolia, and Finland, Prince of Estland, Livland, Courland and Semigalia, Samogitia, Belostok, Karelia, Tver, Yugra, Perm, Vyatka, Bulgaria and other territories; Lord and Grand Duke of Nizhny Novgorod, Sovereign of Chernigov, Ryazan, Polotsk, Rostov, Yaroslavl, Beloozero, Udoria, Obdoria, Kondia, Vitebsk, Mstislavl, and all northern territories; Sovereign of Iveria, Kartalinia, and the Kabardinian lands and Armenian territories – hereditary Lord and Ruler of the Circassians and Mountain Princes and others; Lord of Turkestan, Heir of Norway, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein, Stormarn, Dithmarschen, Oldenburg, and so forth, and so forth, and so forth.

The Patriarchs of Moscow, who were the head of Russian Orthodox Church, also have acted as the leaders of Russia from time to time, usually in periods of political upheaval as during the Polish occupation and interregnum of 1610–1613.

Monarchs of various Russian states prior to 1547[edit]

The land that is today known as Russia was populated by various East Slavic peoples from before the ninth century. The first states to exert hegemony over the region were those of the Rus' people, a branch of Nordic Varangians who moved into the region occupied by modern Russia sometime in the ninth century, and set up a series of states starting with the Rus' Khaganate sometime around 830 or so. Little is known of the Rus' Khaganate beyond its existence, including the extent of its territory or any reliable list of its Khagans (rulers). Traditionally, Russian statehood is traced to Rurik, a Rus' leader of Holmgard (later Novgorod, modern Veliky Novgorod), a different Rus' state. Rurik's successor Oleg moved his capital to Kiev, founding the state of Kievan Rus'. Over the next several centuries, the most important titles were those of the Grand Prince of Kiev and Grand Prince of Novgorod whose holder (often the same person) could claim hegemony. By the early 11th century, however, the Rus' state had fragmented into a series of petty principalities which warred constantly with each other. In 1097, the Council of Liubech formalized the federal nature of the Russian lands. By the 12th century, the Grand Duchy of Vladimir became the dominant principality, adding its name to those of Novgorod and Kiev, culminating with the rule of Alexander Nevsky. After Alexander Nevsky, the region once again broke up into petty states, though the Grand Duchy of Moscow, founded by Alexander Nevsky's youngest son Daniel, began to consolidate control over the entire Russian territory in the 15th century. Following the Mongol conquests of the 13th century, all of the Russian principalities paid tribute to the Golden Horde, effectively operating as vassals of the Mongol state. The Russians began to exert independence from the Mongols, culminating with Ivan the Great of Moscow ceasing tribute to the Horde, effectively declaring his independence. The last Grand Duke (sometimes Grand Prince) of Moscow Ivan the Terrible assumed the title Tsar of All Russias in 1547.

Princes of Novgorod[edit]

Monarch Portrait Born-Died Relationship with Predecessor(s) Ruled from Ruled until
Rurik Rurik titularnik.jpg 830-879 none 862 879
Oleg of Novgorod (regent) Oleg of Novgorod.jpg 855-912 Relative of Rurik and regent of Rurik's son, Prince Igor of Kiev 879 882

Grand Princes of Kiev[edit]

Monarch Portrait Born-Died Relationship with Predecessor(s) Ruled from Ruled until
Askold and Dir (non-Rurikids) 11 1 List of Radzivill Chron.jpg ?-882 none 842[3][4] or 862 882
Oleg of Novgorod (regent) Oleg of Novgorod.jpg 855-912 Relative of Rurik and regent of Rurik's son, Prince Igor of Kiev 882 Autumn 912
Igor I Knyazigor.jpg 878-945 Son of Rurik 879 (in Novgorod, as an heir of Rurik); 913[5] Autumn 945
Saint Olga of Kiev (regent) Olga by Roerich 2.jpg 890-969 Igor I's wife and regent of Sviatoslav I of Kiev 945 962
Sviatoslav I the Great Svatoslav titularnik.png 942–972 Son of Igor I and Olga of Kiev Autumn 945 March 972
Yaropolk I Yaropolk murder.jpg 950-980 Son of Sviatoslav I March 972 11 June 980
Saint Vladimir I the Great Vladimir I of Kiev.PNG 958–1015 Younger son of Sviatoslav I, brother of Yaropolk I 11 June 980 15 July 1015
Sviatopolk I the Accursed Sviatopolk silver srebrenik.jpg 980–1019 Son of Vladimir I 15 July 1015 Autumn 1016
Yaroslav I the Wise Yaroslav the Wise.jpg 978–1054 Younger son of Vladimir I, brother of Sviatopolk I Autumn 1016 Summer 1018
Sviatopolk I the Accursed Sviatopolk silver srebrenik.jpg 980–1019 Son of Vladimir I 14 August 1018 27 July 1019
Yaroslav I the Wise Yaroslav the Wise.jpg 978–1054 Younger son of Vladimir I, Younger brother of Sviatopolk I 27 July 1019 20 February 1054
Iziaslav I Minskizjaslav.jpg 1024–1078 First son of Yaroslav I 20 February 1054 15 September 1068
Vseslav of Polotsk Drazdovicz Usiaslau.jpg 1039–1101 Great-Grandson of Vladimir I. Usurped the Kievan Throne 15 September 1068 29 April 1069
Iziaslav I Minskizjaslav.jpg 1024–1078 First son of Yaroslav I 2 May 1069 22 March 1073
Sviatoslav II Izbornik.jpg 1027–1076 Third son of Yaroslav I 22 March 1073 27 December 1076
Vsevolod I Vsevolod yaroslavich.jpg 1030–1093 Fourth son of Yaroslav I 1 January 1077 15 July 1077
Iziaslav I Minskizjaslav.jpg 1024–1078 First son of Yaroslav I 15 July 1077 3 October 1078
Vsevolod I Vsevolod yaroslavich.jpg 1030–1093 Fourth son of Yaroslav I 3 October 1078 13 April 1093
Sviatopolk II Congress in Dolobsk 1103.jpg 1050–1113 Son of Iziaslav I 24 April 1093 16 April 1113
Vladimir II Monomakh Vladimir monomakh.jpg 1053–1125 Son of Vsevolod I 20 April 1113 19 May 1125
Mstislav the Great Mstislav I of Kiev (Tsarskiy titulyarnik).jpg 1076–1132 Son of Vladimir II 20 May 1125 15 April 1132
Yaropolk II Yaropolk II of Kiev.jpg 1082–1139 Son of Vladimir II, Younger brother of Mstislav 17 April 1132 18 February 1139
Viacheslav I Изяслав мстиславович.jpg 1083-2 February 1154 Son of Vladimir II 22 February 1139 4 March 1139
Vsevolod II Vsevolod Ol'govich.jpg 1084-1146 Grandson of Sviatoslav II 5 March 1139 30 July 1146
Igor II CvKnyazIgor.jpg 1096-19 September 1146 Grandson of Sviatoslav II 1 August 1146 13 August 1146
Iziaslav II Panteleimon Ізяслав II Пантелеймон.jpg 1097–1154 Older son of Mstislav 13 August 1146 23 August 1149
Yuri I the Long Arms Dolgorukiy.jpg 1099–1157 Younger brother of Mstislav 28 August 1149 Summer 1150
Viacheslav I Изяслав мстиславович.jpg 1083-2 February 1154 Son of Vladimir II Summer 1150 Summer 1150
Iziaslav II Panteleimon Ізяслав II Пантелеймон.jpg 1097–1154 Older son of Mstislav Summer 1150 Summer 1150
Yuri I the Long Arms Dolgorukiy.jpg 1099–1157 Younger brother of Mstislav August 1150 Winter 1151
Iziaslav II Panteleimon Ізяслав II Пантелеймон.jpg 1097–1154 Older son of Mstislav Winter 1151 13 November 1154
Viacheslav I Изяслав мстиславович.jpg 1083-2 February 1154 Son of Vladimir II Spring 1151 6 February 1154
Rostislav I Rostislav Mstislavich.jpg 1110–1165 Second son of Mstislav 1154 January 1155
Iziaslav III Izyaslav III.jpg ?-1162 Grandson of Sviatoslav II January 1155 1155
Yuri I the Long Arms Dolgorukiy.jpg 1099–1157 Younger brother of Mstislav 20 March 1155 15 May 1157
Iziaslav III Izyaslav III.jpg ?-1162 Grandson of Sviatoslav II 19 May 1157 December 1158
Mstislav II Mstislav Izjaslavich.jpg 1125–1170 Son of Iziaslav III 22 December 1158 Spring 1159
Rostislav I Rostislav Mstislavich.jpg 1110–1167 Second son of Mstislav 12 April 1159 8 February 1161
Iziaslav III Izyaslav III.jpg ?-1162 Grandson of Sviatoslav II 12 February 1161 6 March 1161
Rostislav I Rostislav Mstislavich.jpg 1110–1167 Second son of Mstislav March 1161 14 March 1167
Vladimir III Sin foto.svg 1132–1173 Younger son of Mstislav Spring 1167 Spring 1167
Mstislav II Mstislav Izjaslavich.jpg 1125–1170 Son of Iziaslav III 19 May 1167 12 March 1169

In 1169 Vladimir-Suzdal troops took Kiev. This act underlined the declining importance of that city.[according to whom?]

Grand Princes of Moscow[edit]

Alexander Nevsky, Grand Prince of Vladimir, placed his youngest son Daniel in charge of the territory around Moscow, and establishing the state of Muscovy, originally a vassal state to Vladimir-Suzdal. Daniel's son Ivan I assumed the title of Vladimir himself, establishing Muscovy as the premier principality among the various Russian states. Later rulers of Muscovy would consolidate power, culminating with Ivan III who threw off the Mongol yoke and conquered most of the other Russian states. His son Vasili III completed the task of uniting all of Russia by eliminating the last few independent states in the 1520s. Vasili's son Ivan the Terrible formalized the situation by assuming the title Tsar of All Russias in 1547.

Monarch Portrait Relationship with Predecessor(s) Birth Marriage Ruled from Ruled until Death
Daniel Daniil of Moscow (fresco in Archang. cat).jpg Son of St. Alexander 1261 unknown 1283 4 March 1303 4 March 1303, Moscow, Russia
Yury Jurij of Moscov.jpg Son of Daniel 1281 unknown 4 March 1303 21 November 1325 21 November 1325, Moscow, Russia
Ivan I Kalita Ivan Kalita.jpg Son of Daniel 1288 Helena
9 children
21 November 1325 31 March 1340 31 March 1340, Moscow, Russia
Simeon the Proud Simeon Dumny.jpg Son of Ivan I 7 November 1316 Anastasia of Lithuania
no children

Euphraxia of Smolensk
no children

Maria of Tver
4 sons (died young)
31 March 1340 27 April 1353 27 April 1353, Moscow, Russia
Ivan II the Handsome Ivan krasniy titularnik.jpg Son of Ivan I 30 March 1326 Fedosia Dmitrievna of Bryansk
no children

Alexandra Ivanovna Velyaminova
4 children
27 April 1353 13 November 1359 13 November 1359, Moscow, Russia
Saint Dmitry I Donskoy Dmitri Donskoy.jpg Son of Ivan II 12 October 1350 Eudoxia Dmitrievna of Nizhny Novgorod
12 children
13 November 1359 19 May 1389 19 May 1389, Moscow, Russia
Vasily I Vasily Dmitrievich titularnik.jpg Son of Dmitry I 30 December 1371 Sophia of Lithuania
9 children
19 May 1389 27 February 1425 27 February 1425, Moscow, Russia
Vasily II the Blind Vasil2b.gif Son of Vasily I 10 March 1415 Maria Yaroslavna of Borovsk
3 children
27 February 1425 30 March 1434 27 March 1462, Moscow, Russia
Yury of Zvenigorod no image Son of Dmitry I 26 November 1374 Anastasia Yurynovna
3 children
31 March 1434 5 June 1434 5 June 1434, Moscow, Russia
Vasily Kosoy no image Son of Yury of Zvenigorod 1421 5 June 1434 1435 1435, Moscow, Russia
Vasily II the Blind Vasil2b.gif Son of Vasily I 10 March 1415 Maria Yaroslavna of Borovsk
3 children
1435 1446 27 March 1462, Moscow, Russia
Dmitry Shemyaka no image Son of Yury of Zvenigorod 1446 26 March 1447 1453, Moscow, Russia
Vasily II the Blind Vasil2b.gif Son of Vasily I 10 March 1415 Maria Yaroslavna of Borovsk
3 children
27 February 1447 27 March 1462 27 March 1462, Moscow, Russia
Ivan III the Great Ivan III of Russia.jpg Son of Vasily II 22 January 1440 Maria Borisovna of Tver
one son

Sophia Palaiologina
8 children
5 April 1462 6 November 1505 6 November 1505, Moscow, Russia
Vasily III Vasili III of Russia.jpg Son of Ivan III 25 March 1479 Solomonia Yuryevna Saburova
no children

Elana Vasilyevna Glinskaya
2 sons
6 November 1505 13 December 1533 13 December 1533, Moscow, Russia
Ivan IV the Terrible Kremlinpic4.jpg Son of Vasily III 25 August 1530 unmarried as Prince 13 December 1533 26 January 1547 28 March 1584

Tsars of Russia[edit]

From the rule of Ivan III, the Grand Duchy of Moscow effectively became the dominant Russian state, overthrowing the Golden Horde, consolidating all remaining Russian principalities under itself, and conquering lands far from its roots in the city of Moscow. While Ivan III became effective ruler over the entirety of Russia, the situation was not formally recognized until his grandson Ivan the IV assumed the title Tsar in 1547, that the state of Russia (apart from its constituent principalities) came into formal being.

Dates are listed in the Old Style, which continued to be used in Russia.

House of Rurikovich[edit]

Monarch Portrait Relationship with Predecessor(s) Birth Marriage Ruled from Ruled until Death
Ivan IV the Terrible Kremlinpic4.jpg Son of Vasily III 25 August 1530, Kolomenskoye, Russia Anastasia Romanovna Zakharyina-Yurieva
6 children

Maria Temryukovna
one son (died young)

Marfa Vasilevna Sobakina

Anna Alexeievna Koltovskaya

Anna Vasilchikova

Vasilisa Melentyeva

Maria Dolgorukaya

Maria Feodorovna Nagaya
26 January 1547 28 March 1584 28 March 1584, Moscow, Russia
Simeon II no image None Anastasia Mstislavskaya
(great great granddaughter of Ivan III)
1575 1576 5 January 1616, Moscow, Russia
Feodor I Feodor I of Russia (parsuna, 1630s, Moscow History museum).jpg Son of Ivan IV 31 May 1557, Moscow, Russia Irina Feodorovna Godunova
one daughter
28 March 1584 17 January 1598 17 January 1598, Moscow, Russia

Time of Troubles[edit]

Following the death of the Feodor I, the son of Ivan the Terrible and the last of the Rurik dynasty, Russia fell into a succession crisis known as the Time of Troubles. As Feodor left no male heirs, the Russian Zemsky Sobor (feudal parliament) elected his brother-in-law Boris Godunov to be Tsar. Devastated by famine, rule under Boris descended into anarchy. A series of impostors, known as the False Dmitriys, each claimed to be Feodor's long deceased younger brother. These impostors claimed (and at times actually held) the title of Tsar. A distant Rurikid cousin, Vasili Shuyskiy, also seized power for a time. During the period of Anarchy, foreign powers involved themselves in Russian politics under the leadership of the Vasa monarchs of Sweden and Poland-Lithuania, including Sigismund III Vasa and his son Władysław IV Vasa. As a child, Władysław was even chosen as Tsar by the Seven Boyars, though he was prevented by his father from formally taking the throne. The Time of Troubles is considered to have ended with the election of Michael Romanov to the throne, who established the Romanov dynasty that would rule Russia until the Russian Revolution of 1917.

House of Godunov[edit]

Monarch Portrait Relationship with Predecessor(s) Birth Marriage Ruled from Ruled until Death
Irina (disputed) Irina godunova01 reconstruction.jpg Wife of Feodor I c.1557 Feodor I of Russia
a daughter
7 January 1598 15 January 1598 29 October 1603, Moscow, Russia
Boris I Borisgodunov.jpg Brother of Irina c.1551, Vyazma, Russia Maria Grigorievna Skuratova-Belskaya
2 children
21 February 1598 13 April 1605 13 April 1605, Moscow, Russia
Feodor II Tsar Fyodr II.jpg Son of Boris I 1589, Moscow, Russia unmarried, no children 13 April 1605 1 June 1605 1 June 1605, Moscow, Russia

Pseudo-Rurikovich usurpers[edit]

Monarch Portrait Relationship with Predecessor(s) Birth Marriage Ruled from Ruled until Death
False Dmitry I
(Grigory Bogdanovich Otrepyev)
Pseudo-Dmitrius.jpg None c. 1581 Marina Mniszech
no children
1 June 1605 17 May 1606 17 May 1606, Moscow, Russia
False Dmitry II Pseudo-Dimitrij.jpg None c. 1582 Marina Mniszech
one son (posthumous)
10 July 1607 11 December 1610 11 December 1610, Kaluga, Russia
False Dmitry III (Sidorka) Sin foto.svg None unknown unknown 28 March 1611 18 May 1612 July 1612

House of Shuysky[edit]

Monarch Portrait Relationship with Predecessor(s) Birth Marriage Ruled from Ruled until Death
Vasiliy IV Vasily IV.jpg Ninth generation descendant of Andrei II in the male line 22 September 1552, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia Elena Mikhailovna Repnina
no children

Maria Buynosova-Rostovskaya
2 children
19 May 1606 17 July 1610 (deposed) 12 September 1612, Gostynin, Poland

House of Vasa[edit]

Monarch Portrait Relationship with Predecessor(s) Birth Marriage Ruled from Ruled until Death
Vladislav I Władysław IV Waza.jpg None 9 June 1595, Łobzów, Poland Cecilia Renata of Austria
a daughter and a son, Sigismund Casimir

Marie Louise Gonzaga
no children
6 September 1610 November 1612 (deposed)
14 June 1634 (resigned his claim)
20 May 1648, Merkinė, Lithuania

House of Romanov[edit]

The Time of Troubles came to a close with the election of Michael Romanov as Tsar in 1613. Michael officially reigned as Tsar, though his father, the Patriarch Philaret (died 1633) initially held the real power. However, Michael's descendents would rule Russia, first as Tsars and later as Emperors, until the Russian Revolution of 1917. Peter the Great (reigned 1682-1725), a grandson of Michael Romanov, reorganized the Russian state along more Western lines, establishing the Russian Empire in 1721.

Monarch Portrait Relationship with Predecessor(s) Birth Marriage Ruled from Ruled until Death
Michael I Tsar Mikhail I.jpg First cousin once removed of Feodor I 12 July 1596
Moscow, Tsardom of Muscovy
Maria Vladimirovna Dolgorukova
1624
one stillborn child

Eudoxia Lukyanovna Streshneva
5 February 1626
ten children
26 July 1613 12 July 1645 12 July 1645, Moscow, Tsardom of Muscovy
Alexis I the Quietest Alexis I of Russia (Hermitage).jpg Son of Michael I 9 May 1629
Moscow, Tsardom of Muscovy
Maria Ilyinichna Miloslavskaya
17 January 1648
13 children

Natalia Kirillovna Naryshkina
1 February 1671
3 children
12 July 1645 29 January 1676 29 January 1676, Moscow, Tsardom of Muscovy
Feodor III Feodor III of Russia.jpg Son of Alexis I 9 June 1661
Moscow, Tsardom of Muscovy
Agaphia Simeonovna Grushevskaya
28 July 1680
one son

Marfa Matveievna Apraksina
24 February 1682
no children
29 January 1676 7 May 1682 7 May 1682, Moscow, Tsardom of Muscovy
Sophia (regent) Sophia Alekseyevna by anonim (19 c., Hermitage).jpg Daughter of Alexis I 17 September 1657
Moscow, Tsardom of Muscovy
unmarried, no children 17 May 1682 27 August 1689 3 July 1704, Moscow, Tsardom of Muscovy
Ivan V
jointly with Peter I
Ivan V kremlin.jpg Son of Alexis I 6 September 1666
Moscow, Tsardom of Muscovy
Praskovia Feodorovna Saltykova
1684
5 daughters
2 June 1682 8 February 1696 8 February 1696, Moscow, Tsardom of Muscovy
Peter I the Great
jointly with Ivan V 1682–1696
Peter de Grote Son of Alexis I 9 June 1672
Moscow, Tsardom of Muscovy
Eudoxia Feodorovna Lopukhina
1689
3 children

Marta Helena Skowrońska
1707
9 children
2 June 1682 2 November 1721 8 February 1725, St. Petersburg, Russian Empire

Emperors of Russia[edit]

(Also Grand Princes of Finland from 1809 until 1917; and Kings of Poland from 1815 until 1917)

The Empire of Russia was declared by Peter the Great in 1721. Officially, Russia would be ruled by the Romanov dynasty until the Russian Revolution of 1917. However, direct male descendants of Michael Romanov came to an end in 1730 with the death of Peter II of Russia, grandson of Peter the Great. The throne passed to Anna, a niece of Peter the Great, and after the brief rule of her infant son Ivan VI, the throne was seized by Elizabeth, a daughter of Peter the Great. Elizabeth would be the last of the direct Romanovs to rule Russia. Elizabeth declared her nephew, Peter, to be her heir. Peter (who would rule as Peter III) spoke little Russian, having been a German prince of the House of Holstein-Gottorp before arriving in Russia to assume the Imperial title. He and his German wife Sophia changed their name to Romanov upon inheriting the throne. Peter was ill-liked, and he was assassinated within six months of assuming the throne, in a coup orchestrated by his wife, who became Empress in her own right and ruled as Catherine the Great (both Peter and Catherine were descended from the House of Rurik). Following the confused successions of the descendants of Peter the Great, Catherine's son Paul I established clear succession laws which governed the rules of primogeniture over the Imperial throne until the fall of the Empire in 1917.

Monarch Portrait Relationship with Predecessor(s) Birth Marriage Ruled from Ruled until Death
Peter I the Great Peter de Grote Son of Alexis I 9 June 1672
Moscow, Tsardom of Russia
Eudoxia Feodorovna Lopukhina
1689
3 children

Marta Helena Skowrońska
1707
9 children
2 November 1721 8 February 1725 8 February 1725, St. Petersburg, Russian Empire
Catherine I Empress Catherine I -c.1724 -3.jpg Wife of Peter I 15 April 1684
Ringen (Rõngu), Duchy of Livonia, Sweden
Peter I of Russia
1707
9 children
8 February 1725 17 May 1727 17 May 1727,
St. Petersburg, Russian Empire
Peter II Petr II by J.Ludden (1728, Russian museum) detail.jpg Grandson of Peter I 23 October 1715
St. Petersburg, Tsardom of Russia
unmarried 18 May 1727 30 January 1730 30 January 1730, Moscow, Russian Empire
Anna Louis Caravaque, Portrait of Empress Anna Ioannovna (1730).jpg Daughter of Ivan V 7 February 1693
Moscow, Tsardom of Russia
Frederick Wilhelm, Duke of Courland
November 1710
no children
13 February 1730 28 October 1740 28 October 1740, St. Petersburg, Russian Empire
Ivan VI Ivan VI of Russia.jpg Great-grandson of Ivan V 23 August 1740
St. Petersburg, Russian Empire
unmarried 28 October 1740 6 December 1741 16 July 1764 (murdered)
Shlisselburg, Russian Empire
Elizabeth Portrait of Empress Elizaveta Petrovna by Ivan Vishnyakov.jpg Daughter of Peter I 29 December 1709
Kolomenskoye, Tsardom of Russia
Alexey Razumovsky
1742
no children
6 December 1741 5 January 1762 5 January 1762,
St. Petersburg, Russian Empire
Peter III Peter III by A.Antropov (1762, Tretyakov gallery).jpg Grandson of Peter I 21 February 1728
Kiel, Schleswig-Holstein
Princess Sophie Friederike Auguste of Anhalt-Zerbst
16 August 1745
one son
9 January 1762 9 July 1762 17 July 1762 (murdered), Ropsha, Russian Empire
Catherine II the Great Catherinethegreatroslin.jpg Wife of Peter III 2 May 1729
Stettin, Kingdom of Prussia
Peter III of Russia
16 August 1745
one son
9 July 1762 17 November 1796 17 November 1796, St. Petersburg, Russian Empire
Paul I Borovikovskiy PtPavla1GRM.jpg Son of Peter III 1 October 1754
St. Petersburg, Russian Empire
Princess Wilhelmina Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt
29 September 1773
one stillborn son

Princess Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg
26 September 1776
ten children
17 November 1796 23 March 1801 23 March 1801
(assassinated)
St. Petersburg, Russian Empire
Alexander I the Blessed Alexander I of Russia by G.Dawe (1826, Peterhof).jpg Son of Paul I 23 December 1777
St. Petersburg, Russian Empire
Princess Louise of Baden
28 September 1793
2 daughters
23 March 1801 1 December 1825 1 December 1825, Taganrog, Russian Empire
Constantine I (disputed) Konstantinpaulowrussland(crop).jpg Son of Paul I 27 April 1779
Tsarskoye Selo, Russian Empire
Princess Juliane of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld
26 February
no children
1 December 1825 26 December 1825 27 June 1831
Vitebsk, Russian Empire
Nicholas I Nicholasbotman(1).jpg Son of Paul I 6 July 1796
Gatchina, Russian Empire
Princess Charlotte of Prussia
13 July 1817
7 children
1 December 1825 2 March 1855 2 March 1855,
St. Petersburg, Russian Empire
Alexander II the Liberator Alexanderbymakovsky.jpg Son of Nicholas I 29 April 1818
Moscow, Russian Empire
Princess Marie of Hesse and by Rhine
16 April 1841
8 children
2 March 1855 13 March 1881 13 March 1881
(assassinated)
St. Petersburg, Russian Empire
Alexander III the Peace-Maker Dmitriev 001(crop).jpg Son of Alexander II 10 March 1845
St. Petersburg, Russian Empire
Princess Dagmar of Denmark
9 November 1866
6 children
13 March 1881 1 November 1894 1 November 1894
Livadiya, Russian Empire
Saint Nicholas II Nicholas II of Russia painted by Earnest Lipgart.jpg Son of Alexander III 6 May 1868
Tsarskoye Selo, Russian Empire
Princess Alix of Hesse and by Rhine
26 November 1894
5 children
1 November 1894 15 March 1917 17 July 1918 (executed)
Yekaterinburg, Russian SFSR
Michael II (disputed) Mikhail Aleksandrovich by Repin.JPG Son of Alexander III 22 November 1878
Tsarskoye Selo, Russian Empire
Natalia Brassova
15 October 1911
one son (born before his parents' marriage)
15 March 1917 16 March 1917 (formally, 1 September 1917, the formal abolishment of monarchy) 12 June 1918 (murdered)
Perm, Russian SFSR

See List of leaders of Russia for the continuation of leadership.

Pretenders to the Russian throne since 1917[edit]

See Line of succession to the Russian throne

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Russian history: Kievan Rus". Russiapedia. RT. Retrieved November 26, 2013. 
  2. ^ Glenn E. Curtis (1996). "Kievan Rus' and Mongol Periods". Russia: A Country Study. Federal Research Division of the Library of Congress. Retrieved November 26, 2013. 
  3. ^ Suszko, Henryk (2003). Latopis hustyński. Opracowanie, przekład i komentarze. Slavica Wratislaviensia CXXIV. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego. ISBN 83-229-2412-7; Tolochko, Oleksiy (2010). The Hustyn' Chronicle. (Harvard Library of Early Ukrainian Literature: Texts) ISBN 978-1-932650-03-7
  4. ^ according to the Tale of Bygone Years, the date is not clearly identified
  5. ^ officially

External links[edit]