Tsozong Gongba Monastery

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Tsozong Gongba Monastery
Basum Lake 01.jpg
Tsozong Gongba Monastery in Pagsum Lake
Tsozong Gongba Monastery is located in Tibet
Tsozong Gongba Monastery
Tsozong Gongba Monastery
Location in Tibet and China
Tsozong Gongba Monastery is located in China
Tsozong Gongba Monastery
Tsozong Gongba Monastery
Location in Tibet and China
Coordinates 30°00′33″N 93°54′58″E / 30.00917°N 93.91611°E / 30.00917; 93.91611Coordinates: 30°00′33″N 93°54′58″E / 30.00917°N 93.91611°E / 30.00917; 93.91611
Monastery information
Location Gongbo'gyamda County, Nyingchi Prefecture, Tibet Autonomous Region
Type Tibetan Buddhist
Sect Nyingma

3,540m

Tsozong Gongba Monastery (also romanized as Tsodzong or Tsomum) is a small Tibetan Buddhism monastery in eastern Tibet, China. The monastery, founded in 1400, practices the Nyingma tradition.[1] Tsozong Gongba is located on Tashi Island (Chinese: 扎西岛; pinyin: Zhāxī Dǎo) in the middle of Pagsum Lake in the Nyenchen Tanglha Mountains, part of Gongbo'gyamda County in Nyingchi Prefecture, Tibet Autonomous Region. Tsozong Gongba means "castle in the lake" in Tibetan. The monastery has four buildings situated around a small yard.

The construction of the Tsozong Gongba Monastery was chaired by the Nyin-gma-pa monk Sungye Lingpa and is now home of few nuns.

The three statues (Chenresig, Guru Rimpoché and Sakya Thukpa, see below) were actually shot and burned by the People's Liberation Army (PLA) during the Cultural Revolution, before being restored by the local lama Dudjom Rimpoche and his son Chuni Rimpoche (now a resident at Lamaling Monastery near Bayi town[2]). A small kora around the monastery passes several hard-to-discern holy sites, including a Sky burial site, a 'body-print' of Gesar.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tibet by Bradley Mayhew & Michael Kohn, Lonely Planet Publications, 2005, p.232
  2. ^ Tibet of China by An Caidan, China Intercontinental Press, 2003 (ISBN 7-5085-0374-0/K489), p.144
  3. ^ Tibet, Life, Myth, and Art by Michael Willis, Thorsons 2003, p.69
  4. ^ Tibetan Phrasebook by Sandup Tsering, Lonely Planet Publications, 2002, pp.15-17

See also[edit]