tty (unix)

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tty
Initial releaseNovember 3, 1971; 48 years ago (1971-11-03)
Operating systemUnix and Unix-like
TypeCommand

In computing, tty is a command in Unix and Unix-like operating systems to print the file name of the terminal connected to standard input.[1]

tty stands for TeleTYpewriter.[2]

Usage[edit]

The tty command is commonly used to check if the output medium is a terminal. The command prints the file name of the terminal connected to standard input. If no file is detected (in case, it's being run as part of a script or the command is being piped) "not a tty" is printed to stdin and the command exits with an exit status of 1. The command also can be run on silent mode (tty -s) where no output is produced, and the command exits with an appropriate exit status.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "tty". pubs.opengroup.org. Retrieved 2020-02-14.
  2. ^ "What does "TTY" stand for?". Ask Ubuntu. Retrieved 2020-02-14.
  3. ^ "tty(1) - Linux man page". linux.die.net. Retrieved 2020-02-14.

External links[edit]