Tucker Carlson Tonight

This is a good article. Click here for more information.
Page semi-protected
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tucker Carlson Tonight
Red text "Tucker Carlson", written in all caps, atop blue text reading "tonight" in lowercase, with strikes on either side
Logo used from 2016 to 2021
Also known asTucker
GenreCurrent affairs program
Presented byTucker Carlson
Country of originUnited States
No. of seasons6
Production
Production locationsWashington, D.C. (primary)
Bryant Pond, Maine (primary)
Florida (on location)
Los Angeles, California (specials)
Camera setupMulti-camera
Running time60 minutes (with commercials)
Original release
NetworkFox News
ReleaseNovember 14, 2016 (2016-11-14) –
April 21, 2023 (2023-04-21)

Tucker Carlson Tonight is an American conservative[a] talk show and current affairs program hosted by political commentator Tucker Carlson. The show aired on Fox News from November 14, 2016, to April 21, 2023, replacing On the Record hosted by Greta Van Susteren. Tucker Carlson Tonight included political commentary, monologues, interviews, and analysis, sharing some similarities with On the Record. Guest hosts for the program included Will Cain, Sean Duffy, Tulsi Gabbard and Brian Kilmeade.

The show is presented in a populist format. Tucker Carlson Tonight employed a minute-by-minute viewership rating system, a change brought about by Ron Mitchell, the former senior producer for The O'Reilly Factor. During its run, the show garnered significant attention amid several controversies. In July 2020, Tucker Carlson Tonight became the highest-rated primetime program across all of cable news; its dominance in the time slot ended only after the program's abrupt cancellation.[6]

On April 24, 2023, Fox News announced that Tucker Carlson had departed the network. The timeslot was rebranded as Fox News Tonight and filled by an interim rotation of personalities. In response, Carlson announced an intent to create a show on Twitter; Tucker on Twitter released its first episode in June. On July 17, Jesse Watters Primetime took the place of Carlson's former timeslot.

Format

Opening segment

Tucker Carlson, the eponymous host of Tucker Carlson Tonight

Carlson dedicates the opening segment of Tucker Carlson Tonight to topical culture issues and economic populism.[7] Opening segments have focused on a debunked story that Nashville mayor John Cooper concealed COVID-19 case numbers[8] and an April 2017 poll showing a larger margin of victory for Donald Trump against Hillary Clinton while mocking the 2017 Women's March in January.[9] During his visit to Budapest, Hungary in August 2021, Carlson opened Tucker Carlson Tonight by supporting the premiership of Hungarian prime minister Viktor Orbán.[10] Carlson's final opening segment combined the Great Replacement conspiracy theory with—among other things—FICO scores, home appraisals, the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, vice president Kamala Harris, and marijuana legalization, of a backdrop over the failures of a cult;[11] the Great Replacement was also referenced in an April 2021 taping of the show.[12] The length of these opening segments has steadily increased since 2019.[13]

Current events segments

Carlson's monologue is followed by one or several main stories. While Tucker Carlson Tonight originally focused on inconsequential cultural issues, such as a new line of hijabs from Macy's and an influx of Romani refugees in California, Pennsylvania, with Carlson claiming that the refugees left "streets covered" with "human feces"—officials documented a single instance of a child defecating on the streets after being unable to make it back home in time, stories of immigration and demographics overshadowed trivial stories.[14] With more executive control, executive producer Ron Mitchell implemented minute-by-minute viewership ratings from the show's previous quarter-hour viewership ratings. Tucker Carlson Tonight began shifting from lighter segments to heavier topics, and overviewed Trumpism rather than Donald Trump himself, frequently criticizing the former president for deviating from campaign promises, such as expanding the Mexico–United States barrier. In opposition to many Fox colleagues, Carlson criticized the assassination of Qasem Soleimani in January 2020 by the Trump administration.[15][16]

Carlson's segments are frequently presented in a populist format, antagonistic towards several notable politicians, executives, and other figures, such as former National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases director Anthony Fauci, former speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, Hungarian-American businessman George Soros, and former Republican representative Liz Cheney. The Russian invasion of Ukraine prompted an episode in which Carlson presented Russian president Vladimir Putin as an ally through the use of rhetorical questions. Carlson extensively references the Great Replacement conspiracy theory, connecting it to the aforementioned "ruling class".[13] During the Dominion Voting Systems v. Fox News Network lawsuit, memos by Fox News vice president Raj Shah were unveiled which showed the network announcing that the anchors of Tucker Carlson Tonight were to immediately label "any and all" policy announcements by president Joe Biden as "socialism", writing that framing such announcements as socialism from an Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Bernie Sanders playbook would likely "animate [Carlson]'s core audience".[17]

Recurring segments

Tucker Carlson Tonight occasionally featured a segment sometimes entitled, "Campus Craziness", displaying professors and students at college campuses—a frequent topic on Fox News and Blake Neff's specialty at The Daily Caller. Such segments involved professors being shunned for criticizing Islam or expressing apparent hatred for white people, and—in one episode—students in Mississippi who mistook a banana peel for a hate crime. One segment, "Top This", found Carlson courting quips at video clips of outraged people, a tactic used by Bill O'Reilly on The O'Reilly Factor.[18] Other segments included "Tucker Takes On"—in which Carlson debates a liberal counterpart and described by executives as "Twitter for television", "The Friend Zone"—promoting other Fox News colleagues or friends of Carlson, the "Final Exam"—a trivia game where two guests compete to answer questions relating to recent headlines,[19] and "King for the Day"—a segment where Twitter users could suggest one thing they would change if they were the president.[14]

Studio

Tucker Carlson Tonight was partially filmed at a garage beside the Whitman Memorial Library in Woodstock, Maine

Tucker Carlson Tonight was broadcast from Bryant Pond, Maine and, occasionally, Florida;[14] in January 2017, it was reported that Tucker Carlson Tonight was broadcast from Fox News' bureau in Washington, D.C.[20] In March 2019, the Sun Journal reported on potential plans for Carlson to use an old town garage beside the Whitman Memorial Library in Bryant Pond as a studio that could potentially host an audience. Carlson, who has spent many of his summers at Lake Christopher, sent the town a letter in December 2018 offering to purchase the garage for US$30,000. The deal was abandoned after the Sun Journal's article,[21] but residents agreed to sell Carlson the garage regardless in November 2019.[22] Construction began on the studio in May 2020 using US$88,000 of Carlson's own money according to documents submitted to the town.[23]

Production

Carlson began each morning by writing his monologue, telling conservative political commentator Dave Rubin on The Rubin Report that he sends his staff—comprising two dozen employees overseen by senior executive producer Justin Wells—a memo with his lead story and guests he would like to book. Tucker Carlson Tonight's producers would then scour several right-wing websites, such as Breitbart News and The Federalist. Early on in the show's production, stories would be sent to a team formed by then-CEO Roger Ailes, who suggested that Carlson's producers abstain from using sources such as the neo-Nazi forum Stormfront. Carlson's producers began progressively submitting less and less stories to Ailes' team.[24] In March 2017, it was reported that the show's producers allegedly contacted moderators of a Tucker Carlson subreddit to solicit suggestions, which was then posted on the pro-Trump subreddit r/The_Donald.[25]

History

Roger Ailes' resignation (2016–2017)

Fox News CEO Roger Ailes's resignation allowed Carlson to receive his own program.

In May 2016, amid a sexual harassment lawsuit filed by former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson, then-CEO Roger Ailes resigned.[26] Ailes' resignation set the stage for Tucker Carlson, who was well-liked by the Murdochs; Tucker had been a regular on the weekend edition of Fox & Friends. In contrast, Ailes told him that Fox News was "his last chance" at network television. Greta Van Susteren's resignation allowed Tucker Carlson Tonight to occupy On the Record's time slot.[27] The show premiered as a 7:00 p.m. ET program in Fox News's lineup on November 14, 2016.[28][14] The program's premiere episode attracted 3.7 million viewers[29] and was rated higher than previous editions of On the Record.[28]

Timeslot changes and boycotts (2017–2023)

Following Megyn Kelly's departure from Fox News, the network announced on January 5, 2017, that Tucker Carlson Tonight would take over the 9:00 p.m. ET time slot vacated by The Kelly File beginning on January 9, 2017.[20] Martha MacCallum was named as his replacement in the 7:00 p.m. timeslot, with her show carrying the title The First 100 Days.[30] Tucker Carlson Tonight switched time slots once again to 9 p.m. ET when Bill O'Reilly of The O'Reilly Factor was let go following allegations of sexual misconduct.[14] In June 2017, Ron Mitchell was named the vice president of story development at Fox News after serving as the senior producer of The O'Reilly Factor until its cancellation in April 2017.[31]

Throughout 2018 and 2019, the show was the target of an advertiser boycott. Advertisers began leaving the show after complaints following Carlson saying that U.S. immigration made the country "poorer, dirtier and more divided." According to Fox News, the advertisers only moved their ad buys to other segments.[32] By early 2019, it was reported the show had lost at least 26 advertisers,[33][34] and by August 2019, Media Matters calculated that the show had lost more than 70 advertisers since December 2018.[35][36] By late September 2019, almost 50 advertisers had released statements announcing the discontinuation of advertising on the show; according to The Guardian, "dozens more cut ties without saying anything publicly."[37] Despite these boycotts, the average cost for a 30-second spot on Tucker Carlson Tonight nearly doubled from 2018 to 2019, according to the advertising analytics company SQAD.[38]

In spite of advertiser boycotts, Tucker Carlson Tonight became the second-highest rated news show in all of primetime in October 2018 with 3.2 million nightly viewers, after Hannity.[39] In April 2020, Carlson's program surpassed Hannity as the highest-rated primetime cable news show, with an average audience of 4.56 million viewers.[40] During the second quarter of 2020, Tucker Carlson Tonight garnered an average audience of 4.33 million viewers, the largest for any program in the history of cable news.[41][42] In July 2020, Tucker Carlson Tonight broke the record for highest-rated program in U.S. cable news history, garnering an average nightly audience of 4.33 million viewers.[43] In February 2022, Mediaite reported that "in the month of October, Tucker Carlson [was] the number-one watched host among Democrats".[44]

In June 2020, Carlson's on-air criticisms of the Black Lives Matter movement led corporations such as The Walt Disney Company, T-Mobile, Papa John's, and Poshmark to pull advertising from his program. A data firm estimated that nearly 38% of Carlson's 2020 advertising revenue had come from My Pillow at half-year. Carlson remained the most-watched cable news host, garnering 680,000 viewers among audience members 25-54.[45] These advertisers had not entirely pulled away from Fox News, according to the television network, but only from Carlson's show.[46] Blake Neff, a South Dakota resident who worked for Carlson's publciation The Daily Caller, served as the head writer for Tucker Carlson Tonight until July 2020, when he was found to have posted racist comments on the largely unmoderated law school message board AutoAdmit under the username "CharlesXII"; the username is an apparent reference to Charles XII of Sweden, who, like Neff, abstained from sex and alcohol.[47]

Cancellation (2023)

A couple of weeks ago, I was watching video of people fighting on the street in Washington. A group of Trump guys surrounded an Antifa kid and started pounding the living shit out of him. It was three against one, at least. Jumping a guy like that is dishonorable obviously. It's not how white men fight.

Tucker Carlson, January 7, 2021[48]

On April 24, 2023, Fox News announced that Carlson had "agreed to part ways" with the network. A reason was not provided for his departure, leading to speculation that it was related to either internal criticism of Fox News leadership, a March 2023 lawsuit filed against Carlson by a senior producer alleging an anti-Semitic and misogynist workplace culture among its staff, or Fox's settlement of a lawsuit by Dominion Voting Systems. The timeslot was temporarily hosted by a rotation of Fox News personalities under the title Fox News Tonight;[49][50][51] Brian Kilmeade hosted the first two nights following Carlson's exit.[52] A document revealed in the lawsuit following the January 6 Capitol attack, wherein Carlson stated that a group of Trump supporters attacking an antifa supporter was "not how white men fight", alarmed several Fox News executives.[48] Carlson signaled his intent to return to television by January 2025, when his current contract with Fox News expires.[53] Speaking to Russell Brand months later, he claimed that Fox News did not tell him the reason for his departure.[54]

Following Carlson's departure from the network, former viewers criticized the decision to use Kilmeade as an interim host, with strong negative reactions being shared by many on social media. Criticisms ranged from Kilmeade's hosting to the decision to fire Carlson.[55][56] Fox News Channel's ratings in the 8 p.m. hour fell dramatically; on April 24, 2023, while the premiere of Fox News Tonight still finished first overall with 2.6 million viewers—a 21% decrease over the average viewership of Tucker Carlson Tonight—it was beaten in the key demographic by a Bill Clinton interview special hosted by Joe Scarborough on MSNBC.[57] Some of Newsmax TV's primetime programs also saw a notable increase in audience, boosted by one of its programs featuring an interview with Donald Trump hosted by Greg Kelly that night.[58][59] On April 25, Fox's ratings fell further, being barely overtaken by MSNBC's All In with Chris Hayes. The timeslot lost approximately half of the viewers it retained as of April 26.[6]

After his dismissal, Carlson announced an intent to produce a web series as a successor to Tucker Carlson Tonight, which would be hosted on his Twitter account; the first episode of the show, Tucker on Twitter, was released on June 6, 2023.[60][61] On June 12, Axios reported that Fox News had sent a cease and desist letter to Carlson, alleging that despite the cancellation of his show, Carlson was still under an exclusive contract with the channel through the end of 2024.[62] In May 2023, Drudge Report reported that Fox News was investigating the possibility of moving Hannity up into Carlson's former time slot, and moving Jesse Watters Primetime and Gutfeld! to the 9 p.m. and 10 p.m. hours respectively.[63] On June 26, 2023, Fox News announced that Jesse Watters Primetime would move up into the former Tucker Carlson Tonight timeslot beginning July 17, with The Ingraham Angle moving to 7 p.m. and Gutfeld! to 10 p.m.[64]

Controversies

Tucker Carlson Tonight has attracted controversy for its coverage of the Great Replacement conspiracy theory, disseminated by French author Renaud Camus

Carlson's rhetoric—particularly its connection with the Great Replacement conspiracy theory—has attracted controversy from conservative and liberal figures. In 2018, former editor-at-large of The Weekly Standard and neoconservative pundit Bill Kristol described the views Carlson expressed on his show as "ethno-nationalism of some kind."[65] Carlson responded that Kristol "discredited himself years ago."[66] In March 2022, during the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Los Angeles Times opinion columnist Jackie Calmes criticized Carlson for his coverage of the invasion which she considered to be biased in favor of Russian president Vladimir Putin and the Kremlin.[67] The 2022 Buffalo shooting, whose perpetrator voiced support for the conspiracy theory, brought renewed attention to Carlson's claims.[4]

Carlson has called the removal of Confederate monuments and memorials the "destruction of America's delicate social fabric" and Austria the next "caliphate of West Arabia". An episode in which Carlson described the murder of white farmers in South Africa—a predominantly black country—as a "white genocide" was a point of contention among Fox News employees. Despite being informed of the story's ties to the neo-Nazi message board The Daily Stormer by Fox Business president Brian Jones, Fox News vice president Tom Lowell defended the story, with Carlson's continuous coverage reaching Trump.[14] These viewpoints were furthered by Fox News founder Rupert Murdoch's eldest son and Fox Corporation CEO Lachlan Murdoch, who showed sympathy towards Carlson.[68]

In November 2020, the show broadcast a segment about alleged voter fraud in Georgia during the 2020 presidential election. The piece featured the story of a World War II veteran named James Blalock of Covington, Georgia, who died in 2006; Carlson claimed that Blalock voted in the election. Reporting by local news outlets in Georgia later confirmed that Blalock did not vote in the 2020 election, but that his widow had cast a legal vote under the name "Mrs. James E. Blalock, Jr", later confirmed by interviews with Blalock's widow herself.[69] A day later, Carlson issued an on-air correction, stating that "we're always going to correct when we're wrong."[70] Later that month, Carlson criticized unfounded claims made by former federal prosecutor Sidney Powell, who alleged that Venezuela, Cuba and unidentified communist interests had used a secret algorithm to hack into voting machines and commit electoral fraud in the 2020 election. Carlson noted that Powell's claims would be the "single greatest crime in American history", and claimed Powell became "angry and told us to stop contacting her" when he asked for evidence of such fraud. In response, James Golden, the producer of The Rush Limbaugh Show, rebuked Carlson.[71]

In July 2020, after combat veteran and senator Tammy Duckworth called for a "national dialogue" about the removal of monuments to Founding Fathers such as George Washington—who owned slaves—Carlson received backlash after referring to her as a "moron" and, after she refused to appear on his show absent an apology, a "coward". Carlson's comment that "she was once injured while serving in the Illinois National Guard" was criticized, and he was accused of trivializing her military service; Duckworth lost both of her legs while serving in Iraq.[72]

Legal issues

In a September 2018 episode of Tucker Carlson Tonight, Carlson coined the nickname "creepy porn lawyer" to refer to Michael Avenatti, ostensibly in reference to the latter's representing Stormy Daniels,[73] which Avenatti objected to and reportedly found infuriating.[74] Following on and off-air sparring between Carlson and Avenatti, the latter announced that he was investigating an alleged bar altercation involving Carlson and a patron.[75] This culminated in the revelation that Carlson had thrown a glass of wine at a man who had insulted his daughter.[75] A July 2019 book by author Peter D'Abrosca made reference to the incident.[76]

In December 2019, Playboy model Karen McDougal sued Fox News after Carlson used his show to accuse her of extorting President Donald Trump. In September 2020, a federal judge dismissed the lawsuit, citing Fox News' defense that Carlson's extortion claims were opinion-based and not "statements of fact". The judge also agreed with Fox News' defense that reasonable viewers would have "skepticism" over statements Carlson makes on its show, as he often engages in exaggeration and "non-literal commentary".[77]

In May 2023, footage surfaced online of Carlson making disparaging off-air comments about women—such as calling one "yummy" and asking a female makeup artist if women have "pillow fights" in the restroom—first published by the organization Media Matters for America. Other clips show Carlson calling a Dominion Voting Systems lawyer a "slimy little motherfucker", criticizing the streaming service Fox Nation, and discussing sex with British journalist Piers Morgan.[78] In response, Fox News sent a cease-and-desist letter to the organization.[79]

Notes

  1. ^ Attributed to multiple sources: USA Today,[1] Reuters,[2] CBS News,[3] NBC News,[4] and NPR[5]

References

Citations

  1. ^ Alexander, Bryan (April 24, 2023). "Everything to know about top-rated Fox News host Tucker Carlson's exit: A seismic cable shift". USA Today. Archived from the original on April 25, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  2. ^ Coster, Helen (April 25, 2023). "Tucker Carlson leaves Fox News days after Dominion lawsuit settlement". Reuters. Archived from the original on April 25, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  3. ^ Gibson, Kate (June 16, 2023). ""Bye-bye Tucker Carlson!" T-Mobile CEO says as advertisers drop Fox News show". CBS News. Archived from the original on April 27, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  4. ^ a b Arkin, Daniel (May 16, 2022). "Fox News' Tucker Carlson under fresh scrutiny after Buffalo mass shooting". NBC News. Archived from the original on March 22, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  5. ^ Davies, Dave (May 12, 2022). "Has Tucker Carlson created the most racist show in the history of cable news?". NPR. Archived from the original on June 28, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  6. ^ a b Dickey, Josh (April 27, 2023). "Tucker Carlson's Old Fox News Timeslot Ratings Crater With Brian Kilmeade Losing Audience Nightly". TheWrap. Archived from the original on April 28, 2023. Retrieved April 28, 2023.
  7. ^ Lahut, Jake (November 23, 2020). "Tucker Carlson was attacked by Trump supporters for questioning the outlandish claims of the president's lawyer Sidney Powell before she was fired". Business Insider. Archived from the original on March 23, 2021. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  8. ^ Bauder, David; Loller, Travis (September 21, 2020). "Fox News apologizes for using debunked coronavirus story". The Washington Post. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  9. ^ Saraiya, Sonia (April 24, 2017). "'Tucker Carlson Tonight' Takes Over Bill O'Reilly's Timeslot — and Delivers the Same Bombast". Variety. Archived from the original on April 27, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  10. ^ Cabrera Cuadrado & Chrobak 2023, p. 1.
  11. ^ Garber, Megan (April 25, 2023). "Tucker Carlson's Final Moments on Fox Were as Dangerous as They Were Absurd". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on April 26, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  12. ^ Keveny, Bill (April 12, 2021). "Tucker Carlson doubles down on voter 'replacement' comments after ADL calls for his firing". USA Today. Archived from the original on April 25, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  13. ^ a b Confessore, Nicholas; Decker, Ben; Silver, Jacob; Tate, Julie (April 30, 2022). "How 'Tucker Carlson Tonight' Fuels Extremism and Fear". The New York Times. Archived from the original on April 30, 2022. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  14. ^ a b c d e f Confessore, Nicholas (April 30, 2022). "How Tucker Carlson Reshaped Fox News — and Became Trump's Heir". The New York Times. Archived from the original on April 30, 2022. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  15. ^ Stelter, Brian (January 5, 2020). "Fox's Tucker Carlson breaks with colleagues and criticizes Trump's strike on Iranian general". CNN. Archived from the original on May 1, 2023. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  16. ^ Epstein, Kayla (January 7, 2020). "One of Trump's most vocal critics on Iran? Fox News's Tucker Carlson". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on March 10, 2020. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  17. ^ Griffing, Alex (March 31, 2023). "'Any and All' Biden Policies Should Be Labeled 'Socialism': 4 New Revelations From Fox News-Dominion Lawsuit". Mediaite. Archived from the original on April 3, 2023. Retrieved April 3, 2023.
  18. ^ Poniewozik, James (May 3, 2017). "In Conservative Prime Time, It's Now Fox and Enemies". The New York Times. Archived from the original on May 3, 2017. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  19. ^ Mackey, Maureen (June 4, 2022). "Grandfather forced to fight kangaroo that attacked his dogs". Fox News. Archived from the original on April 29, 2023. Retrieved April 29, 2023.
  20. ^ a b Snider, Mike (January 5, 2017). "Fox taps Tucker Carlson to replace Megyn Kelly". USA Today. Archived from the original on April 27, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  21. ^ Collins, Steve (March 13, 2019). "Tucker Carlson pulls plug on plans for Fox News studio in Bryant Pond". Sun Journal. Archived from the original on April 26, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  22. ^ Collins, Steve (November 21, 2019). "There may yet be a Tucker Carlson studio in Bryant Pond". Sun Journal. Archived from the original on April 27, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  23. ^ Collins, Steve (May 18, 2020). "Tucker Carlson creating studio in Bryant Pond". Sun Journal. Archived from the original on April 27, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  24. ^ Confessore, Nicholas (April 30, 2022). "How Tucker Carlson Stoked White Fear to Conquer Cable". The New York Times. Archived from the original on April 30, 2022. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  25. ^ "Tucker Carlson Tonight Allegedly Solicits Show Ideas From Reddit". Media Matters for America. March 2, 2017. Archived from the original on April 26, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  26. ^ Koblin, John; Steel, Emily; Rutenberg, Jim (May 22, 2016). "Roger Ailes Leaves Fox News, and Rupert Murdoch Steps In". The New York Times. Archived from the original on April 27, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  27. ^ Sherman, Jake; Palmer, Anna; Lippman, Daniel (December 13, 2016). "Voters skeptical Trump can separate biz from duties; Generals liked, bankers unpopular". Politico. Archived from the original on August 18, 2023. Retrieved August 18, 2023.
  28. ^ a b Umstead, R. Thomas (November 15, 2016). "Fox News' 'Tucker Carlson Tonight' Has Strong Debut". Multichannel News. Archived from the original on October 21, 2020. Retrieved November 18, 2017.
  29. ^ Epstein, Kayla; Halpert, Madeline (April 25, 2023). "How Tucker Carlson rode a wave of populist outrage". BBC News. Archived from the original on August 19, 2023. Retrieved August 18, 2023.
  30. ^ "Tucker Carlson takes over Megyn Kelly's slot, Martha MacCallum gets new show". Fox News Channel. January 5, 2017. Archived from the original on January 5, 2017. Retrieved January 6, 2017.
  31. ^ Steinberg, Brian (June 12, 2017). "Fox News Channel Promotes Six to New Programming Roles". Variety. Archived from the original on April 26, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  32. ^ Katz, A.J. (December 20, 2018). "20-Plus Brands Have Stopped Advertising on Tucker Carlson Tonight After Immigration Comments". Adweek. Archived from the original on March 24, 2019. Retrieved March 24, 2019.
  33. ^ Brunley, Gabrielle (March 22, 2019). "If Tucker Carlson Keeps Hemorrhaging Advertisers He Might Soon Be Down to Just 'My Pillow'". Esquire. Archived from the original on March 24, 2019. Retrieved March 24, 2019.
  34. ^ Barr, Jeremy (March 22, 2019). "Without Major Sponsors, Tucker Carlson's Show Leans on Ads for Fox Programming". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 24, 2019. Retrieved March 24, 2019.
  35. ^ Uhl, Jordan (August 19, 2019). "Tucker Carlson returns to Fox News – but advertisers are staying away". Media Matters for America. Archived from the original on August 20, 2019. Retrieved August 21, 2019.
  36. ^ Darby, Luke (August 20, 2019). "Tucker Carlson's Show Bled 70 Advertisers in Less Than a Year". GQ. Archived from the original on November 15, 2019. Retrieved November 15, 2019.
  37. ^ Helmore, Edward (September 28, 2019). "Trump impeachment inquiry sparks 'bedlam' at Fox News". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on September 28, 2019. Retrieved September 28, 2019.
  38. ^ Katz, A.J. (August 21, 2019). "Despite Controversy and Boycotts, Ad Costs For Tucker Carlson Tonight Are Nearly Double What They Were Last Year". Adweek. Archived from the original on August 27, 2019. Retrieved August 27, 2019.
  39. ^ Rowland, Geoffrey (October 31, 2018). "Fox News tops CNN and MSNBC combined in October cable news ratings". The Hill. Archived from the original on November 22, 2018. Retrieved November 22, 2018.
  40. ^ Grynbaum, Michael M. (April 28, 2020). "Tucker Carlson Beats Sean Hannity as Trump Briefings Give Fox News a Boost". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 3, 2020. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  41. ^ Katz, A.J. "Fox News Q2 2020 Ratings: Tucker Carlson Averaged 4.33 Million Viewers at 8 p.m., the Largest Audience in Cable News History". Adweek. Archived from the original on June 30, 2020. Retrieved June 30, 2020.
  42. ^ Brest, Mike (June 30, 2020). "Tucker Carlson breaks cable news viewership record as networks' ratings skyrocket". Washington Examiner. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  43. ^ Concha, Joe (July 1, 2020). "Trump Dings CNN, 'Morning Joe' Ratings As Tucker Carlson Sets Record". The Hill. Archived from the original on July 3, 2020. Retrieved July 3, 2020.
  44. ^ Griffing, Alex (February 2, 2022). "Tucker Carlson Most-Watched Host Among Democrats in the Demo". Mediaite. Archived from the original on February 5, 2022. Retrieved February 5, 2022.
  45. ^ Joyella, Mark (June 16, 2020). "Tucker Carlson Is Most-Watched Host In Cable News For Last Week". Forbes. Archived from the original on June 17, 2020. Retrieved June 16, 2020.
  46. ^ Mazza, Ed (July 7, 2020). "Tucker Carlson Accused Of Echoing White Supremacist Talking Points On Fox News". HuffPost. Archived from the original on July 8, 2020. Retrieved July 8, 2020.
  47. ^ Darcy, Oliver (July 10, 2020). "Tucker Carlson's top writer resigns after secretly posting racist and sexist remarks in online forum". CNN. Archived from the original on July 10, 2020. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  48. ^ a b Peters, Jeremy; Schmidt, Michael; Rutenberg, Jim (May 2, 2023). "Carlson's Text That Alarmed Fox Leaders: 'It's Not How White Men Fight'". The New York Times. Archived from the original on May 4, 2023. Retrieved May 5, 2023.
  49. ^ Graham, David A. (April 24, 2023). "Tucker's Successor Will Be Worse". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on April 24, 2023. Retrieved April 24, 2023.
  50. ^ Barr, Jeremy; Ellison, Sarah (April 24, 2023). "Tucker Carlson is out at Fox News after Dominion lawsuit disclosures". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Archived from the original on April 24, 2023. Retrieved April 24, 2023.
  51. ^ Robertson, Katie (April 24, 2023). "In a Lawsuit, Tucker Carlson Is Accused of Promoting a Hostile Work Environment". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on April 24, 2023. Retrieved April 24, 2023.
  52. ^ Shafer, Ellise (April 25, 2023). "Brian Kilmeade Fills Tucker Carlson's Fox News Slot in First Show After Shocking Exit: 'I Wish Tucker the Best'". Variety. Archived from the original on April 25, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  53. ^ Peters, Jeremy; Mullin, Benjamin (May 5, 2023). "Tucker Carlson Wants to Return to TV Before 2025. Will Fox Let Him?". The New York Times. Archived from the original on May 5, 2023. Retrieved May 5, 2023.
  54. ^ Blanchet, Ben (July 8, 2023). "Tucker Carlson Claims He 'Really' Doesn't Know Why Fox News Parted Ways With Him". HuffPost. Archived from the original on July 8, 2023. Retrieved July 8, 2023.
  55. ^ Slisco, Aila (April 24, 2023). "Tucker Carlson fans respond to Fox News' first replacement host: "Nope"". Newsweek. Archived from the original on April 25, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  56. ^ Moye, David (April 25, 2023). "Fox News Viewers Aren't Happy Brian Kilmeade Is Hosting Tucker Carlson's Show Tonight". HuffPost. Archived from the original on April 25, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  57. ^ Lindsay, Benjamin (April 17, 2023). "Bill Clinton Names the 'Big Problem With Gun Owners' in Fight for Reform: 'They Have to Treat Each Other Like People'". TheWrap. Archived from the original on June 2, 2023. Retrieved August 30, 2023.
  58. ^ Porter, Rick (April 25, 2023). "Fox News Takes Ratings Hit After Tucker Carlson's Exit". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on April 29, 2023. Retrieved April 29, 2023.
  59. ^ Kaonga, Gerrard (April 26, 2023). "Fox News loses ratings battle after Tucker Carlson departure as rivals gain". Newsweek. Archived from the original on April 26, 2023. Retrieved April 26, 2023.
  60. ^ Yang, Mary; Folkenflik, David. "Tucker Carlson says he'll take his show to Twitter". NPR. Archived from the original on June 8, 2023. Retrieved May 9, 2023.
  61. ^ Nahs, Charlie (June 6, 2023). "Tucker Carlson Drops First Episode of 'Tucker on Twitter'". Mediaite. Archived from the original on June 6, 2023. Retrieved June 7, 2023.
  62. ^ Pengelly, Martin (June 12, 2023). "Tucker Carlson 'will not be silenced' as Fox News seeks to ban Twitter show". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on June 26, 2023. Retrieved June 26, 2023.
  63. ^ Baragona, Justin (May 17, 2023). "Fox News Considers Major Primetime Shuffle After Tucker Carlson Firing". The Daily Beast. Archived from the original on May 17, 2023. Retrieved May 17, 2023.
  64. ^ Johnson, Ted (June 26, 2023). "Fox News Makes Post-Tucker Carlson Primetime Shuffle: Jesse Watters Slotted At 8 PM, Laura Ingraham Moves To 7 PM And Greg Gutfeld Goes To 10 PM". Deadline. Archived from the original on June 26, 2023. Retrieved June 26, 2023.
  65. ^ Harwood, John (January 25, 2018). "Bill Kristol hits Fox News, Tucker Carlson for 'dumbing down' coverage, pushing 'ethno-nationalism'". CNBC. Archived from the original on March 19, 2018. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  66. ^ McLaughlin, Aidan (January 26, 2018). "Tucker Fires Back at Bill Kristol: 'Former Intellectual Who Now Exists Primarily on Twitter'". Mediaite. Archived from the original on March 21, 2018. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  67. ^ Calmes, Jackie (March 18, 2022). "Column: Tucker Carlson shills for Putin while his colleagues are killed in Ukraine". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on May 13, 2022. Retrieved March 20, 2022.
  68. ^ Levitz, Eric (April 24, 2023). "Fox News Could Be Just as Racist Without Tucker Carlson". Intelligencer. Archived from the original on May 2, 2023. Retrieved May 5, 2023.
  69. ^ Castronuovo, Celine (November 14, 2020). "Tucker Carlson issues on-air apology over Georgia voter claims". The Hill. Archived from the original on November 14, 2020. Retrieved November 14, 2020.
  70. ^ Beer, Tommy (November 14, 2020). "Fox News Host Tucker Carlson Apologizes After Falsely Claiming A Dead Man Voted In Georgia". Forbes. Archived from the original on November 14, 2020. Retrieved November 14, 2020.
  71. ^ Peters, Jeremy W. (November 20, 2020). "Tucker Carlson Dared Question a Trump Lawyer. The Backlash Was Quick". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 9, 2021. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  72. ^ Proctor, Stephen (July 8, 2020). "Tucker Carlson continues attack on 'moron' and 'coward' Sen. Tammy Duckworth". Yahoo. Archived from the original on July 10, 2020. Retrieved July 11, 2020.
  73. ^ Axelrod, Tal (September 13, 2018). "Tucker Carlson calls Avenatti 'creepy porn lawyer' in heated interview". The Hill. Archived from the original on May 8, 2021. Retrieved August 18, 2023.
  74. ^ Bever, Lindsey (September 14, 2018). "Michael Avenatti furious over 'CREEPY PORN LAWYER' chyron on Fox News". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on November 8, 2019. Retrieved November 8, 2019.
  75. ^ a b Korecki, Natasha; Forgey, Quint (November 10, 2018). "Avenatti takes on Tucker Carlson after bar incident involving Fox News host's children". Politico. Archived from the original on March 14, 2022. Retrieved November 8, 2019.
  76. ^ D'Abrosca 2019, p. 1.
  77. ^ Folkenflik, David (September 29, 2020). "You Literally Can't Believe The Facts Tucker Carlson Tells You. So Say Fox's Lawyers". NPR. Archived from the original on October 31, 2020. Retrieved October 31, 2020.
  78. ^ Passantino, Jon (May 5, 2023). "Fox demands Media Matters stop publishing leaked Tucker Carlson videos". CNN. Archived from the original on May 5, 2023. Retrieved May 6, 2023.
  79. ^ Mastrangelo, Dominick (May 5, 2023). "Fox sends cease-and-desist letter to Media Matters over leaked Tucker Carlson footage". The Hill. Archived from the original on May 5, 2023. Retrieved May 5, 2023.

Bibliography

External links