Tullamore Dew

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Tullamore Dew
Tullamore-Dew-Logo.svg
Type Irish whiskey
Manufacturer D. E. Williams
Country of origin Tullamore, Ireland
Introduced 1829
Alcohol by volume 40%
Related products Irish Mist
Tullamore distillery
A cask bearing the Tullamore Dew brand

Tullamore Dew is a brand of Irish whiskey produced by William Grant & Sons.[1] It is the second largest selling brand of Irish whiskey globally, with sales of over 950,000 cases per annum as of 2015.[2]

The whiskey was originally produced in the Tullamore, County Offaly, Ireland, at the old Tullamore Distillery which was established in 1829.[3] Its name being derived from the initials of Daniel E. Williams (D.E.W.), a general manager and later owner of the original distillery.[3] In 1954, the original distillery closed down, and with stocks of whiskey running low, the brand was sold to John Powers & Son, another Irish distiller in the 1960s, with production transferred to the Midleton Distillery, County Cork in the 1970s following a merger of three major Irish distillers.[4]

In 2010, the brand was purchased by William Grant & Sons, who constructed a new distillery on the outskirts of Tullamore. The new distillery opened in 2014, bringing production of the whiskey back to the town after a break of sixty years.[5]

In 2012, a visitor centre was opened in a refurbished bonded warehouse previously belonging to the original distillery. The centre offers guided tours and tutored tastings ranging from 50 minutes to 5 hours in duration.[6]

History[edit]

The Tullamore Dew Visitor Centre at Bury Quay, Tullamore is housed in a former bonded warehouse belonging to the original distillery.

The origins of Tullamore Dew date back to 1829, when a distillery was established in Tullamore by Michael Molloy.[3] On his death, the distillery eventually passed to his nephew, Bernard Daly who later appointed Daniel E. Williams as the distillery's General Manager.[3] Under Williams's watchful eye, the distillery expanded and prospered, launching the whiskey bearing his initials (D.E.W.), Tullamore Dew.[3]

In 1954, the distillery ceased production, having, like many of those in Ireland at the time, been hit by declining sales due to a number of factors such as Prohibition, the Anglo-Irish Trade War and high taxes introduced by the Irish Free State.[3]

In the 1960s, with whiskey stocks running low, rather than reopen the distillery, the owners opted to sell the brand to John Powers & Son, the Dublin distillers.[3] In 1966, John Powers & Son merged with two other Irish distilleries to form Irish Distillers. In the 1970s, Irish distillers closed their existing distilleries and consolidated production at a new distillery built in Midleton, County Cork.

In 1994, Irish Distillers, then concentrating their international focus on promoting Jameson Irish whiskey, sold the brand to the C&C Group.[7] Subsequently, the C&C Group divested their entire liqueur and spirit business (including Tullamore Dew), which was acquired by William Grant & Sons for €300 million in 2010.[8] At which point, Tullamore Dew was still being produced under license by at the Midleton Distillery.[9] Therefore, as expansion of the brand was dependent on the availability of whiskey from Midleton, and with significant growth envisaged, William Grant & Sons opted to construct a new distillery in Tullamore, rather than depend on outsourced production.[9]

Construction of the distillery is to take place on a phased basis.[9] Phase one was completed in 2014, which saw production of whiskey return to Tullamore for the first time in sixty years.[5] The new distillery has the capapability to produce both malt and pot still whiskey. However, it does not yet have a Coffey still installed to allow the production of grain whiskey. Therefore, as Tullamore Dew is a blend of all three varieties of Irish whiskey,[10] the grain whiskey component of the blend will continue to be sourced from Midleton until phase two is completed.[8]

As of 2015, the whiskey sells about 950,000 cases per year (an amount that has doubled since 2005).[2]

Variants[edit]

Tullamore Dew Original

At present a range of seven whiskeys are sold under the Tullamore Dew brand:[11]

  • Tullamore Dew Original - 40% ABV; a blend of triple-distilled pot still and malt, plus grain whiskey; matured in ex-bourbon and sherry casks[12]
  • Tullamore Dew 10 year old Single Malt - 40% ABV; single malt matured in ex-bourbon, Oloroso, Port and Madeira casks[13]
  • Tullamore Dew 12 year old Special Reserve - 40% ABV; blend with a high pot still and malt content; aged for 12–15 years in ex-bourbon and sherry casks[14]
  • Tullamore Dew Phoenix - 55% ABV; named for a 1785 hot air balloon accident which nearly burned down the town of Tullamore; a blend with a high pot still content; aged in Oloroso sherry casks; only available in airport stores[15]
  • Tullamore Dew 15 year old Trilogy - 40% ABV; a blend; aged in ex-bourbon, Oloroso and rum casks[16]
  • Tullamore Dew Old Bonded Warehouse Release - 46% ABV; released in 2012 to celebrated the opening of a visitor centre in an old bonded warehouse (hence the name), it is only available in the visitor centre; aged in Oloroso casks[17]
  • Tullamore Dew Cider Cask - 40%; finished in cider casks; was released in June 2015 for sale through airport retail outlets. It is claimed to be the first ever Cider Cask finished Irish Whiskey. Tullamore DEW whiskey is finished for 3 months in barrels that have stored pressed fermenting apples for several months.[18]

Popular culture[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tullamore D.E.W." William Grant & Sons. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  2. ^ a b "Tullamore D.E.W. Celebrates One Year Anniversary of the Tullamore Distillery". thetaste.ie. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Townsend, Brian (1999). The Lost Distilleries of Ireland. Glasgow: Neil Wilson Press. ISBN 1897784872. 
  4. ^ Peter, Mulryan (2002). The Whiskeys of Ireland. Dublin: O'Brien Press. ISBN 0862787513. 
  5. ^ a b "Tullamore Dew Opens Irish Distillery". Drinks Industry Ireland. 17 September 2014. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  6. ^ "Visit Us". Tullamore Dew official website. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  7. ^ "C&C eyes up local booze brands". The Irish Times. 3 May 2002. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  8. ^ a b Lodge, Alan (5 May 2010). "William Grant snaps up C&C's Irish Assets". www.thedrinksbusiness.com. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  9. ^ a b c "Proposed Development of the Tullamore Distillery" (PDF). www.epa.ie. Environmental Protection Agency. Retrieved 13 January 2017. 
  10. ^ "The Craft". Tullamore Dew official website. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  11. ^ "Our range". Tullamore Dew official website. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  12. ^ "Tullamore Original". Tullamore Dew official website. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  13. ^ "Single Malt". Tullamore Dew official website. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  14. ^ "12 years old Special Reserve". Tullamore Dew official website. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  15. ^ "Phoenix". Tullamore Dew official website. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  16. ^ "Tullamore Trilogy". Tullamore Dew official website. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  17. ^ "Bonded Warehouse". Tullamore Dew official website. Retrieved 17 January 2017. 
  18. ^ McNamara, Stuart. "Tullamore DEW Cider Cask Irish Whiskey Review". IrishWhiskey.com. Retrieved 13 July 2015. 
  19. ^ Larsson, Stieg (2010). The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets' Nest. Hachette UK. ISBN 1906694419. 
  20. ^ The Mayor of MacDougal Street: A Memoir by Dave Van Ronk

External links[edit]