This is a good article. Follow the link for more information.

Tumbbad

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Tumbbad
Tumbbad poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byRahi Anil Barve
Adesh Prasad
Produced bySohum Shah
Aanand L. Rai
Mukesh Shah
Amita Shah
Screenplay byMitesh Shah
Adesh Prasad
Rahi Anil Barve
Anand Gandhi
StarringSohum Shah
Music byAjay-Atul
Jesper Kyd (Score)
CinematographyPankaj Kumar
Edited bySanyukta Kaza
Production
company
Distributed byEros International
Release date
  • 12 October 2018 (2018-10-12)
(Theatrical release)
Running time
104 minutes
CountryIndia
LanguageHindi
Budget₹50 million[1]
Box office₹135.7 million[2]

Tumbbad is a 2018 Indian Hindi-language historical period horror film directed by debutant Rahi Anil Barve and Adesh Prasad. Written by Barve, Prasad, Mitesh Shah and Anand Gandhi, who also served as the creative director, the film was produced by Sohum Shah, Aanand L. Rai, Mukesh Shah and Amita Shah. Starring Sohum Shah in the lead role as Vinayak Rao, it follows the story of his search for a hidden treasure in 20th century village of Tumbbad, Maharashtra.

Barve began writing the script based on a story a friend had told him about in 1993, by Marathi writer Narayan Dharap. He wrote the first draft in 1997, when he was 18 years old. From 2009 to 2010, he created a 700-page storyboard for the film. It was optioned by seven production companies who backed out and went on the floor (went into production) three times. It was first shot in 2012 but after editing, Barve and Shah were not satisfied. The film was then re-written and re-shot with filming completed in May 2015. Pankaj Kumar served as the director of photography while Sanyukta Kaza was its editor. Jesper Kyd composed the original score while Ajay-Atul composed one song.

Tumbbad premiered in the critics' week section of the 75th Venice International Film Festival—the first Indian film to be screened there. It was also screened at: the 2018 Fantastic Fest, Sitges Film Festival, the Screamfest Horror Film Festival, the El Gouna Film Festival, 23rd International Film Festival of Kerala, Morbido Film Fest, Brooklyn Horror Film Festival and Nitte International Film Festival. It was released on 12 October 2018 to mostly positive reviews with critics praising the visuals. Made on a production budget of 50 million (US$720,000), the film grossed a total of 136 million (US$2.0 million) at the box office, making it a profitable venture. Tumbbad received eight nominations at the 64th Filmfare Awards winning three for Best Cinematography, Best Art Direction and Best Sound Design.

Plot[edit]

In 1947, Vinayak Rao tells his 14-year-old son Pandurang about the Goddess of Prosperity who gave birth to 160 million gods. Hastar, her first and most beloved offspring, was greedy for all the gold and food. The other gods attacked Hastar, but the goddess saved him on the condition that he could never be worshipped and would be forgotten by history. For years, Hastar has been sleeping inside his mother's womb.

In 1918 in Tumbbad, Maharashtra, Vinayak's mother serves the local lord, Sarkar, in his mansion. This includes offering him sexual services. She hopes to acquire a single gold coin kept with his Hastar statue. Meanwhile at their home, Vinayak and his brother Sadashiv worry about having to feed the monstrous old woman who is their grandmother chained up in a separate room. Sarkar later dies and the mother proposes leaving Tumbbad for Pune. Vinayak insists on finding the treasure that is rumoured to be hidden somewhere in the mansion. Sadashiv is badly hurt after falling from a tree, forcing his mother to take him for help. She tells Vinayak he will have to feed his grandmother. She also warns him that if the old woman wakes up, he should say the name "Hastar" to make her sleep. Sadashiv dies on the way to the doctor.

The mother directs her carriage driver to Sarkar's mansion where she retrieves the gold coin. The monstrous old woman attacks and shackles Vinayak who eventually remembers Hastar's name and uses it to make her fall asleep. Desperate to escape his life of poverty, Vinayak returns to Tumbbad. The old woman warns him he will be cursed and become a monster like her if he touches the treasure. She explains that a well leads to the goddess' womb where Hastar dwells, in exchange for ending her prolonged suffering. Vinayak keeps his promise and sets her on fire, thus killing her. Although Hastar stole the goddess's gold, he was unable to acquire her grain. Therefore, he desires flour. Vinayak physically trains to climb up and down a long rope and makes dolls out of dough to lure Hastar inside the goddess's womb. While he is distracted by the food, Vinayak swipes at Hastar's loincloth containing the gold. Vinayak regularly repeats the procedure to steal dropped coins. He offers his first gold coin to the opium merchant Raghav to pay off a debt. Each time he needs more money, Vinayak returns to Tumbbad to steal from Hastar.

Raghav openly wonders about the treasure rumoured to exist in the Tumbbad mansion while also questioning why Vinayak can only retrieve a few coins at a time. Vinayak and his wife give birth to their son Pandurang. When Sergeant Cooper gives him only two days to come through with the money, Raghav sells his widowed daughter-in-law to Vinayak as a mistress. Vinayak follows Raghav to the Tumbbad mansion and tricks him into descending into Hastar's well. Hastar viciously attacks Raghav and he is mutated into the walls of the womb. Vinayak burns Raghav alive to end his suffering. Vinayak takes Pandurang to the mansion and is told not to bring the dough doll down. But he secretly brings a dough doll and Hastar unexpectedly attacks. They nearly escape. Pandurang suggests stealing Hastar's loincloth and they make dozens of dough dolls to distract Hastar. However, the two of them become trapped inside the womb when separate Hastars appear for each one of those dolls. With no hope of escaping, Vinayak ties the dolls to his body to act as bait. Once the coast is clear, Pandurang climbs back to the surface to see his father being mutated into a monster outside the mansion. Vinayak gives the stolen loincloth, but Pandurang refuses to take it. Sobbing at seeing what his father turned into, Pandurang reluctantly sets Vinayak on fire.

Cast[edit]

  • Sohum Shah as Vinayak Rao
  • Jyoti Malshe as Vinayak's mother
  • Dhundiraj Prabhakar Jogalekar as young Vinayak
  • Rudra Soni as Sadashiv
  • Madhav Hari Joshi as Sarkar
  • Piyush Kaushik as Grandmother
  • Anita Date as Vinayak's wife
  • Deepak Damle as Raghav
  • Cameron Anderson as Sergeant Cooper
  • Ronjini Chakraborty as Vinayak's mistress
  • Mohammad Samad as Pandurang

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

Director Rahi Anil Barve said the title is derived from Shripad Narayan Pendse's Marathi novel Tumbadche Khot.[3] He wrote the first draft in 1997, when he was 18 years old. From 2009 to 2010, he created a 700-page storyboard within eight months, which he said was the "anchor on which everything was based."[4] Barve wrote the script based on a story his friend had told when they were in the Nagzira wildlife sanctuary in 1993 "which made him crap his pants."[5] It was a story by Marathi writer Narayan Dharap. Years later, when he revisited Dharap's story, he found it "utterly bland, mundane and forgettable."[5] He realised "It was my friend's narration  ...  that left an indelible print- no, scar on my psyche" which "kept the story alive."[5] Barve took the story's basic premise about a scheming moneylender and another of his works, about a girl left alone with her grandmother who is possessed by a demon, and began writing a screenplay.[6] He managed to find a producer, but they backed out in 2008. He obtained financing and principal photography began in the monsoon of 2012.[3]

Sohum Shah was cast in the role of Vinayak Rao, for which he gained eight kilograms (eighteen pounds).[7] Since the production took six years, he maintained his character's look for the entire period.[8] Shah said that he was surprised after hearing the story for the time because he "hadn't seen anything like this in Indian cinema."[9] He found it similar to Vikram Baital and Panchatantra.[10] Barve said the story's main theme was greed, and that the first half hour of the film is in the "universe of Dharap's stories."[11] The film shows Hastar who, according to mythology stated in the movie, was banished to the womb of the mother goddess for being greedy for food and gold.[11] The film is divided in three chapters which Barve said was also a metaphor for the "journey of India, as we see it today."[11] It had gone on the floor three times and was optioned by seven production companies who backed out. Barve feels this was because he had "no frame of reference for them, nothing like Tumbbad had even been tried before."[11] Shah worked on his Marathi diction and accent since the character of Vinayak was a Marathi.[12] Anand Gandhi served as the co-writer, creative director and executive producer.[13] Barve's initial idea was to tell three different stories of Tumbbad village in the film; Gandhi and Mitesh turned it into one person's story.[14] The myth of Hastar was the last addition to the story to serve as a backstory.[14] The screenplay was written by Barve, Prasad, Gandhi and Mitesh Shah.[15]

Filming and post-production[edit]

Tumbbad first went into production in 2008 with Nawazuddin Siddiqui in the lead role but was quickly shelved as the producer backed out.[6] It was then shot in 2012 after Shah and Gandhi came on board. The film has minimal dialogue and was shot with constant physical movement with few cuts.[3] Barve said, "we shot in the rain at age-old locations, where no human had ventured for at least a hundred years. For me, Tumbbad's locations, the feel of its stuffy air, and the lonely rainy atmosphere that defies the feeling of time's passage is as central as its characters."[3] After the editing, Barve and Shah realised the film was "not able to achieve what it set out to do."[16] It was then re-written and re-shot and the filming completed in May 2015.[16][17] The Mutha River in the Onkareshwar area was taken as a reference for the set creation. In three weeks, the set of the small town around the temple was recreated.[18] A doppelganger set of an old Pune city was created for the film. Sohum Shah wore the typical attire worn by Konkanasth Brahmans in Maharashtra.[19] It was shot in natural light.[4] Some scenes were also shot in Mahabaleshwar and the Tumbbad village.[6][20] The visual effects were produced by Sean Wheelan's team at Filmgate Films, who were also the co-producers.[16] Pankaj Kumar served as the director of photography and Sanyukta Kaza edited the film.[21] Kumar had shot Barve's short film Manjha in 2006 and learned of Tumbbad's story from Barve.[22]

Barve created a story book for reference. Kumar called the filming process "long, strong and intense."[22] It was decided the film's look would be "moody and gloomy"; the village had to look timeless "without a clear demarcation between day and night."[22] The shooting was done without any sunlight on Red Camera in digital format. Kumar said that the film's entire shooting schedule revolved around lighting, noting the constant rain and grey tone gave a "constant sense of gloom and dread."[23] He wanted the film to be shot only during the monsoon with its constant rain as he wanted a feeling of "wetness at all times": "We wanted the audience to feel drenched when they came out of the theatres."[22] However, due to a shortage of rainfall that year, Kumar did not get sufficient rain. The crew used artificial rain for the scenes and had to wait for hours for cloud cover.[22] Tumbbad was shot in several locations across Maharashtra including Saswad and villages of the Satara district. Some scenes were shot on constructed sets in Mumbai, including the womb sequence. Kumar said that the team did extensive recce for a few years as they were looking for "large landscapes without modern infringements, without towers and structures."[22] They also did not have the budget for the visual effects to erase the contemporary architectural elements.[22]

The film had four colour schemes including blue, cold grey, red and gold. 50 lanterns and lamps were used for several scenes to avoid modern-day lighting techniques since it was a period film.[22] The scenes inside the womb took 15 to 20 days to shoot without any visual effects. The character of Hastar was created with heavy prosthetic makeup that required six to seven hours to prepare.[22] Shah wore contact lenses throughout the film for the grey eyes. The entire film was shot over 100 to 120 days with four shooting schedules in 2012 and 2015. After the shoot, the team felt that the film was "halfway there" to becoming something that "audiences hadn't seen before." After that the script went through re-writing, some scenes were added, and the story was "enhanced". The sets were rebuilt and the womb was added.[22] The film's production designers were Nitin Zihani Choudhary and Rakesh Yadav. For their research, they used photograph's from the 18th and 19th century during the British Raj.[24] The interiors of the cave were shot at the Purandare Wada near Pune.[24] It was made to look old and "consumed by earth";[25] the crew spread moss all over the site. An entire market was created at Satara that included several shops, but it was not used very often in the film.[24] The alive, breathing heart in one scene was created using special effects.[24]

The film's post-production took two-and-a-half years to complete.[26] Kaza had asked Prasad to write the dialogues again after she re-arranged the grandmother's tree scene while editing it. She used the "only usable stable shots and put them in a certain order and then called Adesh and asked him to re-write the dialogues according to the edit."[27] Its initial runtime was close to 200 minutes which was edited to 100 minutes.[28] The film's climax inside the womb was shot with only one source of light—an oil lamp.[23] The film was produced by Film i Väst and Filmgate Films along with Eros International and Aanand L. Rai's Colour Yellow Productions.[29]

Music[edit]

Tumbbad's title track was composed, arranged and produced by Ajay−Atul; it was sung in Hindi with lyrics written by Raj Shekhar. It was released on 9 October 2018.[30] The original score was composed by Jesper Kyd. Prasad was sampling music pieces from several composers when he heard the soundtrack "Apocalypse" from the 2006 video game Hitman: Blood Money composed by Kyd and decided to work with him.[31] Kyd felt the Tumbbad team wanted the soundtrack to be between a western and an Indian sound.[31]

Prasad sent Kyd a sample of Laxmikant–Pyarelal's track from Ram Lakhan (1989) for reference; Kyd also watched videos of street drummers and The Sinful Dwarf (1973).[31][32] Kyd recorded the choir with Bulgarian music called "Descending" which was the first track he wrote for the film.[31] Both Prasad and Kyd used to interact with each other through Skype.[31] The score involved live recording with cello and violin as well as the real sound of crickets.[32] Kyd made three different types of sound for the film's three parts.[32] The album consists of 22 tracks and was released on 18 November 2018.[33]

Track listing
No.TitleLength
1."The Birth of Hastar"3:12
2."Rains of Tumbbad"2:16
3."Grandmother's Meal"1:53
4."Secrets"2:30
5."Feeding the Witch"3:50
6."Opportunities"2:03
7."The Greed Manifests"2:47
8."Descending"2:54
9."The Wife"1:06
10."The Box is Opened"1:25
11."Hastar"4:32
12."Happy Ever After"2:30
13."Telefon"1:02
14."Driving in the Rain"1:51
15."The Initiation"2:16
16."Chocolate Coins"1:32
17."The Mistress"0:35
18."Vinayak's Treasure Box"1:30
19."Family Business"3:05
20."The Showdown"3:17
21."The Final Choice"1:56
22."The Goddess"3:10
Total length:51:00

Release[edit]

Tumbbad premiered in the critics' week section of the 75th Venice International Film Festival, becoming the first Indian film to be screened there.[34] It was also screened at: the 2018 Fantastic Fest,[35] Sitges Film Festival, the Screamfest Horror Film Festival,[36] the El Gouna Film Festival,[37] 23rd International Film Festival of Kerala,[38] Morbido Film Fest,[39] Brooklyn Horror Film Festival[40] and Nitte International Film Festival.[41] Before the film's release, a special screening was held by Aanand L. Rai which was attended by the film's team and several other filmmakers.[42] Tumbbad was released in India on 12 October 2018 on 575 screens.[43] It is also available on Prime Video in Hindi, Tamil and Telugu language.[44]

Critical reception[edit]

Domestic[edit]

Tumbbad opened to mostly positive critical reviews. On the review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, it holds an approval rating of 87% based on 23 reviews, with an average rating of 7.67/10.[45] Rachit Gupta of The Times of India called the film "moody and atmospheric" and said that fans of Hollywood horror films will be reminded of Pan's Labyrinth (2006) and Eraserhead (1977).[46] Baradwaj Rangan wrote: "It’s been a while since something genre-based turned out so rich and mysterious, so defiantly its own thing."[47] Raja Sen called the film "an ambitious one, artistic and attentively made, reminding me of the trippy stylings of filmmaker Tarsem Singh."[48] The Indian Express's Shubhra Gupta called it "highly unusual, visually stunning, richly atmospheric concoction of genres and themes."[49]

Sanjukta Sharma of Scroll.in felt the film subverts genres "astutely, without any gimmicks": "It has been a while since a horror film spoke so eloquently about something as primal as greed and remained true to its Indian setting."[50] Mint's Udita Jhunjhunwala cited the film as "eerie, imaginatively designed, stunningly filmed and well directed."[51] Anupama Chopra felt the film was nothing like "you have seen before in Hindi cinema", calling it "the most visually stunning film I've seen since Padmaavat".[52] Subhash K. Jha praised the visuals and wrote: "If you think cinema is predominantly a visual medium then don't miss Tumbbad".[53] Rediff.com's Sreehari Nair observed that "our apprehensions are raised lazily and we wait like masochists for the manipulations to arrive, but what we get instead is a single-line moral."[54] Namrata Joshi gave a positive review and wrote: "The atmosphere, landscape, and themes in Tumbbad are accentuated by a sense of Gothic dread and an eerie expectancy of the diabolical."[55]

Suparna Sharma of the Deccan Chronicle noted that the film has "the beauty and horror of imagination, and it stalks you gently, long after you’ve left the theatre."[56] Reuters' Shilpa Jamkhandikar said that the "true star here is Barve, who takes what could have been a regular horror film and elevates it to another level."[57] Stutee Ghosh of The Quint wrote: "It excels is in its ability to weave together a formidable canvas with fear, fantasy and folklore blending in seamlessly to give us an unrelenting ominous journey."[58] Anna M. M. Vetticad wrote: "The joy of watching Tumbbad comes from the fact that Barve and his co-writers offer no answers, making this a delightfully intriguing film."[59] Rajeev Masand called it "a wildly original film with a look and feel that is of the highest standard."[60] Jai Arjun Singh called the film "spooky, majestic and affecting, and these qualities come from the set design, the use of music, and the evocation of a place that is like a breathing thing, corroding the thoughts and actions of the people in it."[61]

International[edit]

Lee Marshall of Screen International called it an "initially atmospheric yarn let down by weak stock characters and a long veer into fright-free period drama in its over-long middle section".[62] The Hollywood Reporter's Deborah Young called the film "atmospheric, heavy on mythology and scary as hell."[21] J. Hurtado of Screen Anarchy had a positive response and wrote: "A slow burn whose finale is wonderfully unexpected and yet fitting, Tumbbad is a great film and hopefully the start of a new trend in India."[63] He also included it on his list of 14 Favorite Indian Films of 2018.[40]

Dread Central's Jonathan Barkan wrote that the film "is more focused on the horror of human behavior than it is on creaking doors and the terror of what lurks in the dark." He also felt that the film's second half was "overly drawn out".[64] Matt Donato of /Film wrote: "Mad creature-feature designs, Academy-worthy blends of color and pristine optical packaging, despicable character work meant to provoke heartlessness traded for materialistic grandiosity – Tumbbad is a full genre package seasoned with a pungent foreign kick."[65] Trace Thurman of Bloody Disgusting wrote in his review: "With a compelling story of greed that spans more than 30 years, a memorable monster and some truly beautiful cinematography, Tumbbad is not to be missed."[66] Jacob Trussell of Film School Rejects called the film "Indian folk horror at its finest" that offers "an Indian film about Indian culture, removed of the trappings of the musical and replaced with stories of little known Indian theology."[67]

Box office[edit]

Tumbbad was made on a production budget of 50 million (US$720,000).[1] It collected 6.5 million (US$94,000) in its opening day at the box office.[68] The collection increased after positive word of mouth and the film earned 11.5 million (US$170,000) on its second and 14.5 million (US$210,000) on its third day, making a total of 32.5 million (US$470,000) during the first weekend.[69] At the end of its first week, the film earned a total of 58.5 million (US$850,000), it was followed by 89.9 million (US$1.3 million) in its second week and 101 million (US$1.5 million) in its third week.[70] At the end of its nine-week theatrical run, Tumbbad earned a total of 136 million (US$2.0 million) at the box office.[2]

Awards[edit]

Tumbbad received eight nominations at the 64th Filmfare Awards winning three for Best Cinematography, Best Art Direction and Best Sound Design.[71] It received the Best Film award and Gajjar Parth won Best Visual Effects at the Screamfest International Film Festival.[72] Pankaj Kumar won the Best Cinematography award and Rahi Anil Barve, Adesh Prasad and Anand Gandhi won the Asia Focus Award at Sitges Film Festival.[39]

Sequel[edit]

In November 2018, it was announced that Sohum Shah is working on the film's sequel. It will take place in the Tumbbad village and will feature Hastar.[73]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Farooqui, Maryam (22 October 2018). "Success of horror flicks like Stree and Tumbbad an indication of the genre's commercial viability". Moneycontrol.com. Archived from the original on 6 November 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  2. ^ a b "Tumbbad". Bollywood Hungama. Archived from the original on 8 January 2019. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  3. ^ a b c d Hebbar, Prajakta (24 December 2014). "Touching Indifference". The Indian Express. Archived from the original on 9 July 2018. Retrieved 21 August 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  4. ^ a b "Tumbbad's first draft was written in 1997: Director". The Indian Express. 4 October 2018. Archived from the original on 5 October 2018. Retrieved 4 October 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  5. ^ a b c Sequeira, Gayle; Ghosh, Sankhayan (24 August 2018). "Subversive, Artistic and Rooted: The New Hindi Horror Film". Film Companion. Archived from the original on 24 August 2018. Retrieved 24 August 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  6. ^ a b c Ghosh, Sankhayan (9 October 2018). "The Haunting, Genre-Bending Visions of Tumbbad, And How It Came To Fruition". Film Companion. Archived from the original on 18 October 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  7. ^ Pitale, Sonali Joshi (21 November 2013). "'Ship of Theseus' Actor Sohum Shah Puts on 8 Kgs For His Next". Mid Day. Archived from the original on 21 August 2018. Retrieved 21 August 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  8. ^ "Sohum Shah maintained his 'Tumbbad' look for 6 years". The Times of India. 21 September 2018. Archived from the original on 21 September 2018. Retrieved 22 September 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  9. ^ "Sohum Shah on Tumbbad: We took six years but we made the film we wanted to make". The Indian Express. 16 October 2018. Archived from the original on 5 January 2019. Retrieved 5 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  10. ^ Tumbbad Mein Kya Hai?: The Making of the mysteries of Tumbbad: Sohum Shah : Aanand L Rai. YouTube. India: Eros Now. 3 October 2016. Event occurs at 00:12-00:15.
  11. ^ a b c d Malik, Ektaa (21 October 2018). "Run, Hide, But You Can't Escape". The Indian Express. Archived from the original on 5 January 2019. Retrieved 5 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  12. ^ Tumbbad: Vinayak's Journey: Sohum Shah: In Cinemas 12th October. YouTube. India: Eros Now. 11 October 2018.
  13. ^ Sharma, Devansh (12 October 2018). "Anand Gandhi talks about working on Helicopter Eela, Tumbbad and directing a biological sci-fi drama next". Firstpost. Archived from the original on 8 December 2018. Retrieved 7 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  14. ^ a b Tumbbad: The Writing Process: Sohum Shah: Adesh Prasad: Mitesh Shah: Rahi Anil Barve. YouTube. India: Sohum Shah Films. 27 January 2019.
  15. ^ "Tumbbad". Bollywood Hungama. Archived from the original on 8 January 2019. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  16. ^ a b c Frater, Patrick (29 August 2018). "Dark Indian Fantasy 'Tumbbad' Opens Venice Critics Week (EXCLUSIVE CLIP)". Variety. Archived from the original on 30 August 2018. Retrieved 30 August 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  17. ^ Gupta, Rachit (4 October 2018). "Sohum Shah, director Rahi Anil Barve and Adesh Prasad narrate the journey of 'Tumbbad'". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 4 October 2018. Retrieved 4 October 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  18. ^ "'Tumbbad': Makers of the film recreate pre-independence era's Pune". The Times of India. 4 October 2018. Archived from the original on 4 October 2018. Retrieved 4 October 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  19. ^ "Revealed: Here's what the makers of 'Tumbbad' did to recreate the vintage era for the film". Daily News and Analysis. 9 September 2018. Archived from the original on 11 September 2018. Retrieved 10 September 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  20. ^ Srivastava, Priya (16 October 2018). "The village of Tumbbad is for real and also the mystery surrounding it". The Times of India. Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  21. ^ a b Young, Deborah (30 August 2018). "'Tumbbad': Film Review: Venice 2018". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on 30 August 2018. Retrieved 31 August 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Ramnath, Nandini (14 October 2018). "Everybody loves the camerawork in 'Tumbbad'. Pankaj Kumar tells us how the film was shot". Scroll.in. Archived from the original on 3 November 2018. Retrieved 5 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  23. ^ a b Malik, Ektaa (13 November 2018). "Man of Many Shades". The Indian Express. Archived from the original on 7 January 2019. Retrieved 7 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  24. ^ a b c d The Creation of Tumbbad: Production Design: Sohum Shah. YouTube. India: 22 October 2018.
  25. ^ The Creation of Tumbbad: Production Design: Sohum Shah. YouTube. India: 22 October 2018. Event occurs at 01:30-01:35.
  26. ^ Roy, Priyanka (26 October 2018). "Rahi Anil Barve filmed Tumbbad only during the monsoon". The Telegraph. Archived from the original on 7 January 2019. Retrieved 7 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  27. ^ Shekhar, Mimansa (31 January 2019). "Sanyukta Kaza reveals how Tumbbad was made on the editing table". The Indian Express. Retrieved 27 May 2019.
  28. ^ Srivastava, Abhishek (12 October 2018). "Sohum Shah on Tumbbad: Difficult to categorise it under one genre; It's like a thali where every dish is delicious". Firstpost. Archived from the original on 8 December 2018. Retrieved 7 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  29. ^ "Anurag Kashyap, Dhanush, R Madhavan, others applauds Aanand L Rai's Tumbbad teaser". Deccan Chronicle. 22 August 2018. Archived from the original on 11 October 2018. Retrieved 7 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  30. ^ "'Tumbbad': Makers unveil the title track of the film". The Times of India. 9 October 2018. Archived from the original on 10 October 2018. Retrieved 7 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  31. ^ a b c d e The Music of Tumbbad: Sohum Shah: Jesper Kyd: Aanand L Rai. YouTube. India: Eros Now. 17 October 2018.
  32. ^ a b c Sequeira, Gayle (24 October 2018). "The Sound of Fear: How Composer Jesper Kyd Crafted Tumbbad's Stunning Score". Film Companion. Archived from the original on 12 December 2018. Retrieved 7 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  33. ^ "Tumbbad (Original Soundtrack)". iTunes. Archived from the original on 7 January 2019. Retrieved 7 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  34. ^ "Tumbbad, starring Sohum Shah, to be the first Indian movie to open Venice Film Festival's Critics' Week". Firstpost. 23 July 2018. Archived from the original on 21 August 2018. Retrieved 21 August 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  35. ^ Hurtado, J. "Fantastic Fest 2018: Prepare Yourself for the Terror of TUMBBAD With This New Teaser". Screen Anarchy. Archived from the original on 25 August 2018. Retrieved 25 August 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  36. ^ Miska, Brad (25 September 2018). "Screamfest Horror Film Festival to World Premiere 'The Amityville Murders'". Bloody Disgusting. Archived from the original on 16 November 2018. Retrieved 16 December 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  37. ^ Bhaskaran, Gautaman (26 September 2018). "At El Gouna Film Festival, Tumbbad, an Indian fairytale, Unfolds on Screen". CNN-News18. Archived from the original on 27 September 2018. Retrieved 26 September 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  38. ^ "Tumbbad for midnight screening". The Hindu. 1 December 2018. Archived from the original on 8 January 2019. Retrieved 7 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  39. ^ a b Pandya, Sonal (13 October 2018). "Tumbbad's Pankaj Kumar wins Best Cinematography award at Sitges festival". Cinestaan. Archived from the original on 15 October 2018. Retrieved 15 October 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  40. ^ a b Hurtado, J (3 January 2018). "J Hurtado's 14 Favorite Indian Films of 2018". Screen Anarchy. Archived from the original on 4 January 2019. Retrieved 4 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  41. ^ "Nitte International Film Festival from Monday". The Hindu. 6 April 2019. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  42. ^ "Aanand L Rai hosted Tumbbad screening for acclaimed Bollywood filmmakers". Deccan Chronicle. 4 October 2018. Archived from the original on 4 October 2018. Retrieved 4 October 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  43. ^ "Sohum Shah talks about a sequel to Tumbbad". Daily Hunt. 12 December 2018. Archived from the original on 7 January 2019. Retrieved 7 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  44. ^ "Double Celebration For Sohum Shah-Starrer Tumbbad". Mid Day. 3 December 2018. Archived from the original on 4 December 2018. Retrieved 7 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  45. ^ "Tumbbad (2018) - Rotten Tomatoes". Rotten Tomatoes.com. Fandango Media. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  46. ^ "Tumbbad Movie Review". The Times of India. 11 October 2018. Archived from the original on 30 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  47. ^ Rangan, Baradwaj (31 August 2018). "'Tumbbad': Movie Review". Film Companion. Retrieved 31 August 2018.
  48. ^ Sen, Raja (12 October 2018). "Tumbbad movie review: A visually rich story of greed and gold". Hindustan Times. Archived from the original on 28 November 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  49. ^ Gupta, Shubhra (12 October 2018). "Tumbbad movie review: A gorgeous looking, intriguing morality tale". The Indian Express. Archived from the original on 21 October 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  50. ^ Sharma, Sanjukta (12 October 2018). "'Tumbbad' film review: A visually stunning parable about greed and ambition". Scroll.in. Archived from the original on 7 January 2019. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  51. ^ Jhunjhunwala, Udita (11 October 2018). "Tumbbad movie review: A visually rich blend of fear and folklore". Mint. Archived from the original on 12 October 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  52. ^ Chopra, Anupama (10 October 2018). "Tumbbad Movie Review: Like Nothing You've Seen Before In Hindi Cinema". Film Companion. Archived from the original on 25 October 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  53. ^ Jha, Subhash K. (12 October 2018). "Tumbbad review: You will never see anything like this again". Sify. Archived from the original on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  54. ^ Nair, Sreehari (12 October 2018). "Tumbbad Review: A fairytale for grown ups". Rediff.com. Archived from the original on 15 October 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  55. ^ Joshi, Namrata (11 October 2018). "'Tumbbad' review: the demons of the mind". The Hindu. Archived from the original on 8 January 2019. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  56. ^ Sharma, Suparna (13 October 2018). "Tumbbad movie review: Beauty and horror of imagination that stalks you gently". Deccan Chronicle. Archived from the original on 28 November 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  57. ^ Jamkhandikar, Shilpa (12 October 2018). "Movie Review: Tumbbad". Reuters. Archived from the original on 14 October 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  58. ^ Ghosh, Stutee (13 October 2018). "Review: Strong Screenplay, Mood Elements Make 'Tumbbad' A Perfect Horror". The Quint. Archived from the original on 13 October 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  59. ^ Vetticad, Anna M.M (11 October 2018). "Tumbbad movie review: Ship of Theseus team redefines horror with this genre-defying folksy fantasy flick". Firstpost. Archived from the original on 6 December 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  60. ^ Masand, Rajeev (12 October 2018). "Horror high!". RajeevMasand.com. Archived from the original on 14 October 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  61. ^ Singh, Jai Arjun (27 October 2018). "When 'Tumbbad' met 'The Terror'". Mint. Archived from the original on 15 November 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  62. ^ Marshall, Lee (30 August 2018). "'Tumbbad': Venice Review". Screen International. Archived from the original on 30 August 2018. Retrieved 30 August 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  63. ^ Hurtado, J (31 August 2018). "Venice 2018 Review: TUMBBAD Is A Complex Story Of Avarice And Fear". Screen Anarchy. Archived from the original on 31 August 2018. Retrieved 1 September 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  64. ^ Barkan, Jonathan (21 September 2018). "Fantastic Fest 2018: TUMBBAD Review – Fantasy Folk Horror That Drips With Atmosphere". Dread Central. Archived from the original on 22 September 2018. Retrieved 22 September 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  65. ^ Donato, Matt (22 September 2018). "'Tumbbad' Review: A Striking Artistic Display of the Catastrophic Temptations of Fate [Fantastic Fest]". /Film. Archived from the original on 25 September 2018. Retrieved 25 September 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  66. ^ Thurman, Trace (25 September 2018). "[Fantastic Fest Review] Greed is Not Good in the Gorgeous 'Tumbbad'". Bloody Disgusting. Archived from the original on 4 October 2018. Retrieved 4 October 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  67. ^ Trussell, Jacob (29 October 2018). "'Tumbbad' Review: Your New Favorite Dark Fable Has Arrived". Film School Rejects. Archived from the original on 7 November 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  68. ^ "Box Office: Helicopter Eela, FryDay, Tumbbad and Jalebi look for a turnaround after a low Friday". Bollywood Hungama. 13 October 2018. Archived from the original on 14 October 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  69. ^ "Tumbbad box office collection: Sohum Shah's film collects Rs 3.25 crore". The Indian Express. 15 October 2018. Archived from the original on 3 November 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  70. ^ "Baazaar, Badhaai Ho, Tumbbad box office collection: Saif Ali Khan's film collects Rs 11.93 cr on opening weekend". Firstpost. 29 October 2018. Archived from the original on 20 December 2018. Retrieved 8 January 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  71. ^ "Winners of the Filmfare Awards 2019". Archived from the original on 23 March 2019. Retrieved 2 April 2019. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  72. ^ "2018 Festival Awards Announced". Screamfest. 19 October 2018. Archived from the original on 20 October 2018. Retrieved 16 December 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  73. ^ Lohana, Avinash (13 November 2018). "Sohum Shah's Tumbbad up for a sequel". Mumbai Mirror. Retrieved 17 September 2019.

External links[edit]