Turnabout (game show)

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Turnabout
Genre Game show
Created by Clive Doig
Presented by Rob Curling
Country of origin United Kingdom
Original language(s) English
No. of series 8
No. of episodes 239
Production
Running time 25 minutes
Release
Original network BBC One
Picture format 4:3
Original release 26 March 1990 (1990-03-26) – 7 October 1996 (1996-10-07)

Turnabout was a BBC Television daytime quiz programme that aired on BBC One from 26 March 1990 until 7 October 1996. The programme was hosted by Rob Curling.

Format[edit]

Three contestants competed to solve word puzzles and play various games. Each was assigned a colour: red, green, or blue. After the final game was complete, the contestant with the highest score was declared the day's winner. The winners and highest-scoring losers during a series were invited back at its end to compete in a tournament for prizes.

Sphere Game[edit]

This game was played with a 4-by-4 grid of 16 spheres. The host specified a sequence of three letters that had to appear in each correct word and asked a series of toss-ups on the buzzer. For each toss-up, a string of blanks was shown to indicate the number of letters in the word, with the three given ones already filled in. (E.g. LAB----- and a clue of "hired worker" would lead to LABOURER.) A correct buzz-in answer allowed the contestant to change the colour of one sphere, but a miss deducted 5 points from their score.

Each player started the game with four spheres of their own color already on the board, and the remaining four were gray. The rules on changing sphere colours varied. Originally, a contestant could choose any sphere after a correct answer; a gray one (in the centre of the board) would turn directly to their colour, while any other sphere would advance in a three-step cycle, from red to green to blue and back to red. Later, the four gray spheres were moved to the corners and had to be changed before any others could be selected, and any chosen sphere would go directly to that contestant's colour.

Contestants scored 5 points for making a horizontal/vertical/diagonal row of three spheres in their own colour, or 10 points for a line of four. The round ended after three minutes had elapsed, and a second round was immediately played with the three-letter sequence reversed (e.g. "LAB" becoming "BAL"). The grid was not reset between the two rounds.

In the first series, the highest-scoring contestant at the end of both rounds advanced to play the Star Game, then played the same two opponents in another Sphere Game round with the scores reset to zero. The board was not reset, however, and the colour cycle ran in reverse order (blue to green to red).

If a game or episode ended in a tie for high score, the contestant with more spheres in their own colour was the winner.

Palindrome Game (1994–5)[edit]

This round was played identically to the Sphere Game, but the three given letters read the same forwards and backwards (e.g. "ELE").

Star Game[edit]

In the first series, the winner of the Sphere Game played this round alone, using a grid of 16 words that each contained one of the two three-letter sequences that had just been used. They had 10 seconds to study the grid, then 50 seconds to match the words with clues given by the host. Five points were awarded for each correct answer.

From Series 2 onwards, all three contestants had a chance to play the Star Game in ascending order of score from the previous round. Each chose one of three sequence that all contained the same three letters (e.g. SIT, TIS, STI), which would appear in all of their words.

About Turn (1996)[edit]

The contestants were shown a word with three consecutive letters removed, which formed a word of their own, and the host read a clue on the buzzer. Giving the correct three-letter word scored 15 points for the contestant in third place, 10 for the contestant in second, or 5 for the leader. A miss deducted 5 points.

Transmissions[edit]

Series Start date End date Episodes
1 26 March 1990[1] 12 April 1990[2] 12
2 25 March 1991[3] 16 May 1991[4] 28
3 23 March 1992[5] 15 May 1992[6] 32
4 5 April 1993[7] 21 July 1993[8] 32
5 30 August 1994[9] 14 October 1994[10] 32
6 10 July 1995[11] 7 September 1995[12] 40
7 5 February 1996[13] 27 March 1996[14] 38
8 2 September 1996[15] 7 October 1996[16] 25

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 26 March 1990". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  2. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 12 April 1990". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  3. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 25 March 1991". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  4. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 16 May 1991". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  5. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 23 March 1992". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  6. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 15 May 1992". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  7. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 5 April 1993". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  8. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 21 July 1993". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  9. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 30 August 1994". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  10. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 14 October 1994". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  11. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 10 July 1995". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  12. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 7 September 1995". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  13. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 5 February 1996". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  14. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 27 March 1996". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  15. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 2 September 1996". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 
  16. ^ "Turnabout - BBC One London - 7 October 1996". BBC Genome Project. Retrieved 7 November 2014. 

External links[edit]