Turnkey Asset Management Program

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A Turnkey Asset Management Program (TAMP) allows independent financial advisors, typically fiduciaries, to outsource the management of some or all of their clients’ assets.[1] More recently, Certified public accountants, law firms and banks also are using them to enter the financial advice marketplace.[2]

With a TAMP, financial advisors gain access to managed account services that allow them to offload time-consuming functions, such as research, portfolio construction, rebalancing, reconciliation, performance reporting, and tax optimization and reporting, which allows them to focus on clients’ personal financial needs and concerns[3][4][5]

TAMPs are a form of fee-account, which charge fees based on a percentage of the total assets managed in the program.[6][7] TAMPs appeal to independent financial advisors who are building a fee-only business, because they can avoid the cost of building their own fee-accounts platform and can implement a TAMP in about 90 days, instead of the year or longer required to develop the same capabilities in-house.[8]

TAMPs also help independent advisors avoid employee hiring and payroll costs related to internal administration and research, which for a modest program requiring a staff of 8-10 employees can typically cost $1 million per year in ongoing overhead.[8] Because TAMPs serve financial advisors, individual retail investors are not able to directly invest their assets in a TAMP.[7]

History[edit]

The foundation for fee-accounts was created in 1974 with the passage of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), which brought fiduciary law to the forefront, granted legal liability for trust officers and elevated consumer awareness of investing. Fixed commissions ended on May 1, 1975 when the legislation became law, which opened the door for the first discount brokerage firms such as the Charles Schwab Corporation, Scottrade and TD Ameritrade.[9]

In the mid-1980s, the first TAMPs emerged. By 1986, $1 billion in assets was invested in a number of TAMPs, including PMC (absorbed by Envestnet, London Pacific Advisors, now SunGard Advisor Technology and Brinker Capital).[7] By 1994, TAMP assets had increased to $4 billion, and over the next two years, the TAMP market grew to $16 billion in assets.[8] This growth continued throughout the 1990s with the emergence of firms such as AdvisorPort, Asset Mark, Envestnet, Fund Quest and Lockwood. By 2001, the TAMP market was at $78 billion.[4][5][7][8]

Since 1999, the TAMP market has experienced consolidation through acquisitions and mergers to one-in-three TAMPs each year. TAMP growth and consolidation has continued in the 21st century and by 2010, TAMP assets reached $255 billion with the ten largest firms accounting for nearly all assets under management. Those firms included PNC Managed Investments, Brinker Capital, Envestnet, Fund Quest, Assetmark, Lockwood, Prudential Financial, Russell, SEI Investments, and SunGard.[4][5]

The growth of the TAMP market (1000% since the market first emerged) remains small in comparison to the overall market for fee-accounts, which was measured by Tiburon at $1.5 trillion in assets at the beginning of 2010.

TAMP Market Segments[edit]

TAMP providers vary widely in terms of investment philosophies and services, with some specializing in mutual funds, others offering separately managed accounts, or passive investing versus active investing – others offer a platform of multiple options.[2] Market research indicates that two-thirds of TAMP assets are managed by mutual fund TAMPs.[10]

In addition to asset management services, many TAMPs offer additional support and services for financial advisors, such as training programs for financial advisors with Genworth Wealth Management and Loring Ward recognized by Tiburon as offering “extensive” training and educational programs.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ By Nela Ringquist and Dennis Clark, Forbes. "Tap Into The Right TAMP." March 12, 2010. Retrieved May 11, 2010.
  2. ^ a b By Deborah Nason, Investment News. "Turnkey asset management programs taking off." November 20, 2006. Retrieved April 22, 2010.
  3. ^ By Christopher St. Laurent, Houston Business Journal. "Turnkey programs take load off investment advisers." October 2, 2002. Retrieved May 11, 2010.
  4. ^ a b c By Max Alexander, Wall Street Journal. "PRACTICE MANAGEMENT: Weighing Third-Party Asset Management Services." March 23, 2009. Retrieved April 22, 2010.
  5. ^ a b c By Karla Paxton, Advisor Perspectives. "Freedom Though Independence: Outsourcing your Investment Research." Retrieved May 11, 2010.
  6. ^ "Tiburon Strategic Advisors, Separately Managed Accounts & Other Packaged Fee Account Programs: Recasting a Growing Industry." January 29, 2010. Retrieved May 11, 2010.
  7. ^ a b c d Tiburon Strategic Advisors, Separately Managed Accounts & Other Packaged Fee Account Programs: Recasting a Growing Industry, Pages 40-41, March 12, 2010.
  8. ^ a b c d Tiburon Strategic Advisors, Separately Managed Accounts & Other Packaged Fee Account Programs: Recasting a Growing Industry, Page 239, March 12, 2010.
  9. ^ Tiburon Strategic Advisors, Separately Managed Accounts & Other Packaged Fee Account Programs: Recasting a Growing Industry, Page 100, March 12, 2010.
  10. ^ a b Tiburon Strategic Advisors, Separately Managed Accounts & Other Packaged Fee Account Programs: Recasting a Growing Industry, Page 80, March 12, 2010