Turton Urban District

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Turton Urban District
Turton Tower.jpg
Area
 • 1911 17,335 acres (70.15 km2)[1]
 • 1961 17,334 acres (70.15 km2)[1]
Area transferred
 • 1898 Belmont, Bradshaw, Edgworth, Entwistle, Harwood, Longworth, and Quarlton from Bolton Rural District
Population
 • 1891 6,354
 • 1971 21,553
History
 • Created 1873
 • Abolished 1974
 • Succeeded by North Turton, South Turton
Status
 • HQ Turton Tower

Turton Urban District was, from 1873 to 1974, a local government district centred on the historical area of Turton in the administrative county of Lancashire, England.

History[edit]

Background[edit]

Turton was a township and chapelry of the civil and ecclesiastical parish of Bolton le Moors in the Salford Hundred of Lancashire.[2] In 1837, Turton became part of the Bolton Poor Law Union which took responsibility for funding the Poor Law within that Union area.[3] In 1866, Turton was given the status of a civil parish.[4]

Formation[edit]

A resolution for the adoption of the Local Government Act 1858 was passed on 8 August 1872 by the owners and ratepayers of the township of Turton,[5] and the following year a local board was formed to govern the area.[6] After the Public Health Act 1875 was passed by Parliament in that year, Turton Local Board assumed extra duties as an urban sanitary district, although the Local Board's title did not change.[7]

Change[edit]

In 1895, following the implementation of the Local Government Act 1894, Turton Local Board was reconstituted as an elected urban district council of twenty-one members.[6] Four years later, under the Bolton, Turton and Westhoughton Extension Act 1898, Turton Urban District was greatly enlarged by the addition of the civil parishes of Belmont, Bradshaw, Harwood, Longworth, Entwistle, Edgworth and Quarlton from the former Bolton Rural District, which almost doubled the Urban District's population.[6] The Urban District Council had seven electoral wards: Chapeltown, Bromley Cross, Eagley, Egerton, Bradshaw, Edgworth, and Belmont wards, each represented by three councillors.[8] Following the death of Sir Lees Knowles, 1st Baronet, in 1929, his widow, Lady Nina Knowles, presented Turton Tower to the Urban District Council in 1930, which became the council's seat of local government. Between 1961 and 1971, Bradshaw ward was divided into Bradshaw North and Bradshaw South.[8]

Abolition[edit]

Under the Local Government Act 1972, Turton Urban District was abolished on 1 April 1974 and its former area was divided between two local authorities.[9] The larger rural area, North Turton, became a civil parish of the Borough of Blackburn in Lancashire.[9][10] The smaller urban area, South Turton, became an unparished area of the Metropolitan Borough of Bolton in Greater Manchester.[9]

Demography[edit]

Population changes of Turton, 1891–1971
YearPopulation±%
1891 6,354—    
1901 12,355+94.4%
1911 12,648+2.4%
YearPopulation±%
1921 12,154−3.9%
1931 11,847−2.5%
1939 12,173+2.8%
YearPopulation±%
1951 10,956−10.0%
1961 13,698+25.0%
1971 21,553+57.3%
Sources: Urban Sanitary District (USD) 1891.[11] Urban District (UD) 1901–1971.[8][12][13]

Lists of office holders[edit]

Chairmen of Turton Local Board[edit]

Chairmen of Turton Local Board
Name Party Tenure Notes
Edmund Ashworth Liberal
1873–1880
James Booth
1880–1882
Edmund Ashworth, jnr
1882–1886
Thomas Gustav Schwabe Garnett Conservative
1886–1889
Afterwards became Chairman of Turton Urban District Council (1895–1900)
William Wallwork
1889–1892
Robert Ashworth Independent
1892–1895
Afterwards became Chairman of Turton Urban District Council (1908–1924)
Source(s):[14]

Chairmen of Turton Urban District Council[edit]

Chairmen of Turton Urban District Council
Name Party Tenure Notes
Thomas Gustav Schwabe Garnett Conservative
1895–1900
Previously Chairman of Turton Local Board of Health (1886–1889)
Samuel Isherwood
1900–1901
Thomas Hardcastle
1901–1902
Edward Deakin
1902–1908
Robert Ashworth Independent
1908–1924
Previously Chairman of Turton Local Board of Health (1892–1895)
George Harry Ashworth Independent
1924–1926
1st term
Ernest William Greg
1926–1927
Thomas Lomax Conservative
1928–1930
1st term
Sydney Herbert Spring Independent
1930–1931
Walter Harry Wadhams Independent
1931–1934
Jethro Haslam
1934
Died in office
James Platt Independent
1934–1937
Alfred Ruckman Hutchinson Independent
1937–1938
Robert Catterall Conservative
1938–1939
1st term
John William Rostron
1939–1940
George Harry Ashworth Independent
1940–1941
2nd term
John Hamer
1941–1942
Richard Shelmerdine Liberal
1942–1943
William Meredith
1943–1944
George Harry Ashworth Independent
1944–1945
3rd term
Thomas Lomax Conservative
1945–1946
2nd term
Harold Kirk
1946–1947
1st term
Samuel Benson Conservative
1947–1948
William Knowles
1948–1949
1st term
West Scowcroft Independent
1949–1950
Robinson Walsh
1950–1951
Francis William Stilwell Conservative
1951–1952
Robert Catterall Conservative
1952–1953
2nd term
Arthur Shelmerdine Independent
1953–1954
Harold Kirk
1954–1955
2nd term
Robert Catterall Conservative
1955–1956
3rd term
Andrew Thompson Jardine Independent
1956–1957
William Knowles
1957–1958
2nd term
Harold Kirk
1958–1959
3rd term
Hilbre Henry Smith Independent
1959–1960
Charles Halliday Conservative
1960–1961
Hilda Gregory Conservative
1961–1962
Herbert Bennett Conservative
1962–1963
1st term
Michael Constantine Cort Conservative
1963–1964
Herbert Carlisle Walsh Conservative
1964–1965
David Dingwall Labour
1965–1966
John Alston Independent
1966–1967
Herbert Hutchinson
1967–1968
Joseph Jagger Liberal
1968–1969
Philip Stefan Linney Liberal
1969–1970
Leonard Ibbotson Conservative
1970–1971
Keith Crook Richardson Independent
1971–1972
Arthur Poulsom Conservative
1972–1973
Herbert Bennett Conservative
1973–1974
2nd term
Source(s):[14]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Great Britain Historical GIS Project. "Turton UD: Area (acres)". A Vision of Britain through Time. University of Portsmouth. Retrieved 27 July 2016.
  2. ^ Farrer, William; Brownbill, J., eds. (1911). "The parish of Bolton-le-Moors". A History of the County of Lancaster. Victoria County History. Volume 5. British History Online. pp. 235–243. Retrieved 27 July 2016.
  3. ^ Higginbotham, Peter. "The Workhouse: Bolton, Lancashire". The Workhouse: The story of an institution... Retrieved 27 July 2016.
  4. ^ Great Britain Historical GIS Project. "Status details for Civil Parish". A Vision of Britain through Time. University of Portsmouth. Retrieved 27 July 2016.
  5. ^ "No. 23965". The London Gazette. 8 April 1873. p. 1874.
  6. ^ a b c Farrer, William; Brownbill, J., eds. (1911). "Townships: Turton". A History of the County of Lancaster. Victoria County History. Volume 5. British History Online. pp. 273–281. Retrieved 24 August 2010.
  7. ^ Great Britain Historical GIS Project. "Turton USD: Relationships and changes". A Vision of Britain through Time. University of Portsmouth. Retrieved 27 July 2016.
  8. ^ a b c Tatton, Pauline. Local population statistics 1801–1986: abbreviated tables compiled from census statistics for Bolton. Bolton Libraries.
  9. ^ a b c "Greater Manchester Gazetteer". Greater Manchester County Record Office. Place names – T to W. Archived from the original on 18 July 2011. Retrieved 24 July 2016.
  10. ^ "North Turton Parish Council". Retrieved 27 July 2016.
  11. ^ Great Britain Historical GIS Project. "Turton USD: Males & Females". A Vision of Britain through Time. University of Portsmouth. Retrieved 15 July 2016.
  12. ^ Great Britain Historical GIS Project. "Turton UD: Total Population". A Vision of Britain through Time. University of Portsmouth. Retrieved 27 July 2016.
  13. ^ The 1939 population is estimated from the number of identity cards issued to the inhabitants of Turton in that year, which were required under the National Registration Act 1939. The 1941 census did not take place because of the Second World War.
  14. ^ a b Links in a Chain Project. "Turton 1873–1974". Links in a Chain. Retrieved 27 July 2016.

Coordinates: 53°37′53″N 2°24′06″W / 53.6313°N 2.4018°W / 53.6313; -2.4018