Tuy Hoa Air Base

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Tuy Hoa Air Base
Pacific Air Forces.png Emblem of the South Vietnamese Air Force.png
Part of Pacific Air Forces (USAF)
Republic of Vietnam Air Force (RVNAF)
F-100C 188TFS TuyHoa.jpg
F-100C of the 188th Tactical Fighter Squadron, New Mexico Air National Guard, over Tuy Hoa Air Base, South Vietnam in 1968.
Tuy Hoa AB is located in Vietnam
Tuy Hoa AB
Tuy Hoa AB
Location of Tuy Hoa Air Base, Vietnam
Coordinates13°02′58″N 109°20′01″E / 13.04944°N 109.33361°E / 13.04944; 109.33361 (Tuy Hoa AB)Coordinates: 13°02′58″N 109°20′01″E / 13.04944°N 109.33361°E / 13.04944; 109.33361 (Tuy Hoa AB)
TypeAir Force Base
Site information
Controlled byRoundel of the USAF.svg  United States Air Force
ConditionClosed 1973, now civil airport
Site history
Built1966
In use1966-1970
Battles/warsVietnam Service Medal ribbon.svg
Vietnam War
Garrison information
Garrison31st Fighter Wing.png
31st Tactical Fighter Wing (USAF)
Airfield information
Summary
Elevation AMSL20 ft / 6 m
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
03L/21R 9,520 2,902 Concrete
02/20 2,720 844 Concrete
03L/21L 9,300 2,935 Concrete
North American F-100D-60-NA Super Sabres Serials 56-2927 (Front) and 56-2952 of the 309th TFS on the ramp at Tuy Hoa, April 1970.
North American F-100D-25-NA Super Sabre Serial 55-3642 of the 308th Tactical Fighter Squadron.
North American F-100D-90-NA Super Sabre Serial 56-3311 of the 306th Tactical Fighter Squadron.
North American F-100C-25-NA Super Sabres on the flightline from the Federalized 188th Tactical Fighter Squadron, New Mexico Air National Guard, 1968. Serial 54-2045 is in foreground.
355th TFS F-100D 56-3456 1969

Tuy Hoa Air Base is a former air force base in Vietnam, being closed in 1970. It was built by the United States in 1966 and was used by the United States Air Force (USAF) during the Vietnam War in the II Corps Tactical Zone of South Vietnam. It was captured by the People's Army of Vietnam in April 1975 and was abandoned for several decades. Today, the site has been redeveloped as Dong Tac Airport.

USAF use[edit]

In September 1965 Tuy Hoa was identified as a potential site for an air base and in October, following feasibility and soil studies, CINCPAC recommended construction of a base there. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (MACV) originally opposed the decision based on cost, logistical, construction capacity/manpower and security concerns, but in December it agreed to begin construction in January 1966. However in January construction was postponed by MACV in favour of constructing Phù Cát Air Base.[1] In order to speed up construction of the Tuy Hoa base, in February 1966 Air Force Secretary Harold Brown approached Defense Secretary Robert McNamara for approval to engage a private contractor to build the base.[1]:120-1 After overcoming opposition from CINCPAC and MACV, the USAF signed a Turnkey contract with Walter Kidde Constructors, Inc. to build the base on 27 May 1966. Walter Kidde committed to achieved interim capability within 7 months of contract signing, complete the base within one year and open permanent port facilities within 15 months.[1]:121-2

Walter Kidde began construction in June and on 15 November 1966, 45 days ahead of schedule, interim capability was achieved when the 308th Tactical Fighter Squadron equipped with F-100 Super Sabres began arriving at the base. Over the following month the F-100 equipped 306th and the 309th Tactical Fighter Squadrons arrived at the base and on 16 December 1966 the 31st Tactical Fighter Wing became operational at the base.[1]:155[2] Walter Kidde completed the entire contract on schedule and within budget.[1]:300

In November 1966 McNamara instructed the Joint Chiefs of Staff to investigate the possibility of basing 15 B-52s at Tuy Hoa. This proposal was opposed by the Joint Chiefs, USAF Secretary Brown and CINCPAC on cost and security grounds.[1]:153

On 7 June 1968 the Federalized New Mexico Air National Guard 188th Tactical Fighter Squadron deployed to Tuy Hoa and would remain there until 18 May 1969.[2]:55

On 14 June 1968 the Federalized New York Air National Guard 136th Tactical Fight Squadron deployed to Tuy Hoa and would remain there until 25 May 1969.[2]:55

On 29 July 1968 a Viet Cong sapper attack on the base destroyed 2 C-130s and damaged a further 5 C-130s, 1 F-100 and 1 C-47.[3]

In early 1969 Flight A of the 71st Special Operations Squadron equipped with AC-119G Shadow gunships moved to Tuy Hoa from Nha Trang Air Base, it was later replaced by Flight A of the 17th Special Operations Squadron equipped with 4 AC-119G gunships.[4] On 12 April 1970 Flight A moved from Tuy Hoa to Phù Cát Air Base.[4]:213

On 15 May 1969 the 355th Tactical Fighter Squadron deployed to Tuy Hoa.[2]:55

On 28 May 1969 the 416th Tactical Fighter Squadron moved to Tuy Hoa from Bien Hoa Air Base.[2]:55

On 13 July 1970 the last "Wonderarch" concrete and steel aircraft protection shelters were completed at the base.[3]:70-1

On 15 October 1970 the 31st Tactical Fighter Wing left Tuy Hoa and moved without personnel or equipment to Homestead Air Force Base.[2]:55-6

US Army use[edit]

In late 1970, the base was renamed Tuy Hoa Army Airfield and various U.S. Army units, including all army aviation units based at Phú Hiệp Airfield were relocated here.[5] The facility was turned over to South Vietnamese government control on 15 January 1971.

Accidents and incidents[edit]

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website http://www.afhra.af.mil/.

  1. ^ a b c d e f Schlight, John (1999). The United States Air Force in Southeast Asia: The War in South Vietnam The Years of the Offensive 1965–1968 (PDF). Office of Air Force History. p. 87. ISBN 9780912799513.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Ravenstein, Charles A. (1984). Air Force Combat Wings, Lineage & Honors Histories 1947-1977 (PDF). Office of Air Force History. p. 55. ISBN 0912799129.
  3. ^ a b Fox, Roger (1979). Air Base Defense in the Republic of Vietnam 1961–1973 (PDF). Office of Air Force History. p. 67. ISBN 9781410222565.
  4. ^ a b Ballard, Jack (1982). The United States Air Force in Southeast Asia: Development and Employment of Fixed-Wing Gunships 1962–1972 (PDF). Office of Air Force History. p. 203. ISBN 9781428993648.
  5. ^ "Citation Nr: 0840013". U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Retrieved 13 November 2014.
  6. ^ "B-308 Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 20 October 2010.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]