Twentynine Palms, California

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"Twentynine Palms" redirects here. For other uses, see Twentynine Palms (disambiguation).
City of Twentynine Palms
City
Northeast view of Twentynine Palms from Donnell Hill on the south side of town
Northeast view of Twentynine Palms from Donnell Hill on the south side of town
City of Twentynine Palms, CA seal
Seal
Motto: "A Beautiful Desert Oasis"
Location in San Bernardino County and the state of California
Location in San Bernardino County and the state of California
City of Twentynine Palms is located in the US
City of Twentynine Palms
City of Twentynine Palms
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 34°08′08″N 116°03′15″W / 34.13556°N 116.05417°W / 34.13556; -116.05417Coordinates: 34°08′08″N 116°03′15″W / 34.13556°N 116.05417°W / 34.13556; -116.05417[1]
Country  United States
State  California
County San Bernardino
Incorporated November 23, 1987[2]
Government
 • Type Council-manager[3]
Area[4]
 • Total 59.143 sq mi (153.179 km2)
 • Land 59.143 sq mi (153.179 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)  0%
Elevation[1] 1,988 ft (606 m)
Population (July 1, 2013)[5]
 • Total 25,768
 • Density 440/sq mi (170/km2)
Time zone Pacific (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP codes 92277-92278
Area codes 442/760
FIPS code 06-80994
GNIS feature IDs 1652804, 2412119
Website www.ci.twentynine-palms.ca.us

Twentynine Palms (also known as 29 Palms) is a city in San Bernardino County, California, United States. It was previously called Twenty-Nine Palms.

Geography[edit]

The city is located in the Mojave Desert in Southern California.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 59.1 square miles (153 km2), all land.[4]

The city is at an elevation of 1,988 feet (606 m).[1]

The Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms is located there.

Climate[edit]

Due in large part to its elevation of more than 1,900 ft (580 m) above sea level, Twentynine Palms has a slightly cooler climate, especially during winter, than Palm Springs but with essentially the same subtropical desert characteristics. Temperatures reach 100 °F (38 °C) on 90 days, 90 °F (32 °C) on 155 days, and the freezing mark on 24 nights annually. Extremes range from 10 °F (−12 °C) on December 23, 1990 to 118 °F (48 °C) on July 11, 1961.

Climate data for Twentynine Palms, California (1981–2010 normals)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 85
(29)
90
(32)
95
(35)
102
(39)
112
(44)
117
(47)
118
(48)
116
(47)
114
(46)
106
(41)
93
(34)
92
(33)
118
(48)
Average high °F (°C) 61.5
(16.4)
65.3
(18.5)
72.3
(22.4)
79.8
(26.6)
89.3
(31.8)
98.0
(36.7)
102.7
(39.3)
101.0
(38.3)
94.7
(34.8)
82.8
(28.2)
69.4
(20.8)
60.1
(15.6)
81.4
(27.4)
Daily mean °F (°C) 51.1
(10.6)
54.4
(12.4)
60.3
(15.7)
66.8
(19.3)
75.9
(24.4)
83.9
(28.8)
89.4
(31.9)
88.1
(31.2)
81.4
(27.4)
69.8
(21)
57.8
(14.3)
49.9
(9.9)
69.1
(20.6)
Average low °F (°C) 40.8
(4.9)
43.4
(6.3)
48.2
(9)
53.8
(12.1)
62.5
(16.9)
69.7
(20.9)
76.2
(24.6)
75.2
(24)
68.0
(20)
56.8
(13.8)
46.3
(7.9)
39.7
(4.3)
56.7
(13.7)
Record low °F (°C) 11
(−12)
18
(−8)
23
(−5)
29
(−2)
33
(1)
43
(6)
53
(12)
52
(11)
38
(3)
24
(−4)
14
(−10)
10
(−12)
10
(−12)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 0.52
(13.2)
0.57
(14.5)
0.45
(11.4)
0.13
(3.3)
0.09
(2.3)
0.01
(0.3)
0.54
(13.7)
0.80
(20.3)
0.39
(9.9)
0.18
(4.6)
0.24
(6.1)
0.57
(14.5)
4.49
(114.1)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 3.2 3.2 2.5 1.2 0.8 0.2 1.6 2.6 1.6 1.1 1.2 2.4 21.6
Source: NOAA (extremes 1935–present)[6]

History[edit]

Twentynine Palms was named for the palm trees found there in 1852 by Col. Henry Washington while surveying the San Bernardino base line.[7] A post office was established in 1927.[8]

Nearby is a small Indian reservation belonging to the Twentynine Palms Band of Mission Indians. The nearby Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms was founded in 1952.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1970 5,667
1980 7,465 31.7%
1990 11,821 58.4%
2000 14,764 24.9%
2010 25,048 69.7%
Est. 2015 26,025 [9] 3.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]

Its population as of July 1, 2013 was estimated at 25,768.[5]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census of 2010,[11] there were 25,048 people, 8,095 households, and 5,847 families residing in the city. The population density was 423.5 people per square mile (163.5/km²). There were 9,431 housing units at an average density of 159.5 per square mile (61.6/km²), of which 2,742 (33.9%) were owner-occupied, and 5,353 (66.1%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 3.6%; the rental vacancy rate was 9.2%. 6,876 people (27.5% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 14,825 people (59.2%) lived in rental housing units. The racial makeup of the city was 71.6%, White (60.8% non-Hispanic),[12] 8.2% African American, 1.3% Native American, 3.9% Asian, 1.4% Pacific Islander, 6.7% from other races, and 6.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 20.8% of the population.

The Census reported that 21,701 people (86.6% of the population) lived in households, and 3,347 (13.4%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters.

There were 8,095 households out of which 43.3% had children under the age of 18 living in them, 54.5% were opposite-sex married couples living together, 12.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.9) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 5.0% unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 51 0.6% same-sex married couples or partnerships. 21.1% of households were made up of individuals and 5.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the city the population was spread out with 25.6% under the age of 18, 30.0% aged 18 to 24, 25.5% aged 25 to 44, 13.1% aged 45 to 64, and 5.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 23.5 years. For every 100 females there were 129.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 139.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $42,572. About 14.4% of the population were living below the poverty line.[12]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 14,764 people, 5,653 households, and 3,855 families residing in the city. The population density was 269.3 inhabitants per square mile (104.0/km²). There were 6,952 housing units at an average density of 126.8 per square mile (49.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 71.0% White, 9.4% African American, 1.5% Native American, 3.8% Asian, 10.2% Pacific Islander, 6.2% from other races, and 6.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.9% of the population. The Hispanic population has increased 50% since the 2000 census.

There were 5,653 households out of which 39.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.8% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.8% were non-families. 25.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.6 and the average family size was 3.1.

In the city the population was spread out with 31.2% under the age of 18, 15.2% from 18 to 24, 28.4% from 25 to 44, 16.7% from 45 to 64, and 8.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 27 years. For every 100 females there were 101.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $31,178, and the median income for a family was $32,251. Males had a median income of $25,081 versus $25,141 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,613. About 13.6% of families and 16.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.3% of those under age 18 and 10.0% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

The city uses a council-manager form of government. An elected city council establishes policy and appoints a city manager who executes these policies.[3]

State and federal representation[edit]

In the California State Legislature, Twentynine Palms is in the 16th Senate District, represented by Republican Jean Fuller, and in the 42nd Assembly District, represented by Republican Chad Mayes.[14]

In the United States House of Representatives, Twentynine Palms is in California's 8th congressional district, represented by Republican Paul Cook.[15]

Economy[edit]

The Oasis of Mara,[16] maintained by the United States National Park Service, is visited by about 140,000 people every year; per Indian legend, the Oasis is the location of the original 29 palm trees planted by the Serrano Indians.[17]

Education[edit]

Copper Mountain College is a community college serving the Morongo Basin.[18]

The Morongo Unified School District provides an education for public school students.[19]

Mayfield College[20] offers a training program to prepare active duty service members for careers in the Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration (HVAC/R) industry.

Media[edit]

The Desert Trail newspaper in Yucca Valley is published weekly.[21] The Sun Runner Magazine of California Desert Life and Culture is published bi-monthly.[22]

There is one AM station: KNWH a transmitter of KNWQ-1140 KNews Radio – Twentynine Palms (San Bernardino) CA US news/talk, and several FM Stations – Twentynine Palms (San Bernardino) CA US hot ac, Low Power FM Translator and K214CR|r.KCRW-89.9 NPR – Twentynine Palms (San Bernardino) CA US public.[23]

Infrastructure[edit]

Roads[edit]

Notable people[edit]

  • Willie Boy, subject of the movie Tell Them Willie Boy Is Here and the book by the same name. He was a Piute-Chemehuevi Indian born in 29 Palms.[24]
  • Mike Evans, actor and writer, was a longtime resident and died at his mother's house in Twentynine Palms.[25]
  • Cliff Raven, noted American tattoo pioneer, lived and worked in Twentynine Palms in his later years.

In popular culture[edit]

Music[edit]

A song, "The Lady from 29 Palms", was written by Allie Wrubel in 1947 and recorded by such artists as Frank Sinatra,[26] Freddy Martin, Tony Pastor, and The Andrews Sisters.

The album Lily on the Beach by German electronic music ensemble Tangerine Dream contains an instrumental piano ballad called "Twenty-Nine Palms".

Former Led Zeppelin singer Robert Plant had a hit single called "29 Palms", from his solo album Fate of Nations in 1993.

The band Sublime mentioned the city of Twentynine Palms, CA in their song "April 29, 1992 (Miami)" off of their self-titled album, and also in their song "Thanx" off of their 40 oz. to Freedom album.[27]

Track two of the album "Places" by Brad Mehldau, released in 2000, is named after the city. [28]

In 2006, the pop punk band Forever Came Calling was founded here.[citation needed]

Film[edit]

Some scenes in the 1963 comedy film It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World were shot in Twentynine Palms.[29]

Some scenes in the 1964 comedy film "Kiss Me, Stupid" were shot in Twentynine Palms.[30]

Twentynine Palms is a 2003 drama/horror film set in Twentynine Palms.[31]

Radio[edit]

On April 22, 1945, The Jack Benny Program was broadcast from Twentynine Palms Auxiliary Naval Air Station. There were jokes about the base's dry, hot weather, along with a comedic sketch of the town's history.[32]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Twentynine Palms". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved October 12, 2014. 
  2. ^ "California Cities by Incorporation Date" (Word). California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Retrieved August 25, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "Council/Manager Form of Government". City of Twentynine Palms. Retrieved January 24, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b "2010 Census U.S. Gazetteer Files – Places – California". United States Census Bureau. 
  5. ^ a b "Twentynine Palms (city) QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 9, 2015. 
  6. ^ "NowData – NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2013-07-03. 
  7. ^ Gudde, Erwin Gustav; Bright, William (1998). California Place Names: The Origin and Etymology of Current Geographical Names (4th ed.). Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. p. 277. ISBN 0-520-24217-3. LCCN 97043168. Washington ... found 29 'cabbage trees' ... the common name for the Washington palm. 
  8. ^ Durham, David L. (2001). Place-Names of California's Desert Cities. Clovis, CA: Quill Driver Books. p. 178. ISBN 1-884995-31-4. 
  9. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  10. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  11. ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Twentynine Palms city". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2014. 
  12. ^ a b http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/06/0680994.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  13. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  14. ^ "Statewide Database". UC Regents. Retrieved November 30, 2014. 
  15. ^ "California's 8th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. 
  16. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Oasis of Mara
  17. ^ Oasis of Mara – Joshua Tree National Park (U.S. National Park Service)
  18. ^ Copper Mountain College
  19. ^ Morongo Unified School District – Home
  20. ^ Mayfield College
  21. ^ Desert Trail: About Us
  22. ^ The Sun Runner: About Us
  23. ^ http://radiostationworld.com/locations/united_states_of_america/california/radio.asp?m=pal
  24. ^ Niemann, Greg (2006). "6: Pursuit of a Renegade Indian". Palm Springs Legends: creation of a desert oasis. San Diego, CA: Sunbelt Publications. ISBN 978-0-932653-74-1. 
  25. ^ "'Jeffersons' Actor Mike Evans Dies". CBS News. December 22, 2006. Retrieved April 16, 2015. 
  26. ^ Alphabetical List of Songs recorded by Frank Sinatra
  27. ^ http://www.lyricsfreak.com/s/sublime/april+29+1992_20133116.html
  28. ^ http://www.allmusic.com/album/places-mw0000094661
  29. ^ IMDB.com
  30. ^ IMDB.com
  31. ^ IMDB.com retrieved April 26, 2008
  32. ^ [1]

External links[edit]