Two-Face

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Two-Face
TwoFaceYearOne.png
Two-Face in Two-Face Year One #2 (October 2008), art by Jesus Saiz and Jimmy Palmiotti.
Publication information
PublisherDC Comics
First appearanceDetective Comics #66 (August 1942)
Created by
In-story information
Alter egoHarvey Dent
Team affiliations
Notable aliases
  • Apollo
  • Janus
Abilities
  • Criminal mastermind
  • Master marksman
  • Expert lawyer and tactician
  • Skilled hand-to-hand combatant
  • Charismatic leader and speaker
  • Proficient knowledge of explosives
  • Indomitable will

Two-Face (Harvey Dent) is a fictional supervillain appearing in comic books published by DC Comics, commonly as an adversary of the superhero Batman. The character was created by Bob Kane and Bill Finger and first appeared in Detective Comics #66 (August 1942).[3] As one of Batman's most enduring enemies, Two-Face belongs to the collective of adversaries that make up Batman's rogues gallery.

Once an upstanding Gotham City District Attorney, Harvey Dent is hideously scarred on the left side of his face after mob boss Sal Maroni throws acidic chemicals at him during a court trial. He subsequently goes insane and adopts the "Two-Face" persona, becoming a criminal obsessed with the number two, the concept of duality and the conflict between good and evil. In later years, writers have portrayed Two-Face's obsession with chance and fate as the result of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and dissociative identity disorder. He obsessively makes all important decisions by flipping his former lucky charm, a two-headed coin which was damaged on one side by the acid as well. The modern version is established as having once been a personal friend and ally of James Gordon and Batman.[4]

The character has been featured in various media adaptations, such as feature films, television series and video games. Two-Face has been voiced by Richard Moll in the DC animated universe, Troy Baker in the Batman: Arkham series, Billy Dee Williams in The Lego Batman Movie, and William Shatner in Batman vs. Two-Face. His live-action portrayals include Billy Dee Williams in Batman (as Harvey Dent only), Tommy Lee Jones in Batman Forever, Aaron Eckhart in The Dark Knight, and Nicholas D'Agosto in the television series Gotham. In 2009, Two-Face was ranked #12 on IGN's list of the Top 100 Comic Book Villains of All Time.[5]

Publication history[edit]

Two-Face from Detective Comics #66

Two-Face first appears in Detective Comics #66 with the name Harvey "Apollo" Kent;[3] later stories changed his name to "Harvey Dent" to avoid an association with Superman (Clark Kent).[6]

The character only made three appearances in the 1940s, and appeared twice in the 1950s (not counting the impostors mentioned below).[7] By this time, he was dropped in favor of more "kid-friendly" villains, though he did appear in a 1968 issue (World's Finest Comics #173), in which Batman declared him to be the criminal that he most fears. In 1971, writer Dennis O'Neil brought Two-Face back, and it was then that he became one of Batman's arch-enemies.

In his autobiography, Batman creator Bob Kane claims to have been inspired by Robert Louis Stevenson's Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, specifically the 1931 film version which he saw as a boy. Some inspiration was also derived from the Pulp magazine character the Black Bat, whose origin story included having acid splashed on his face.[8]

In the wake of Frank Miller's 1986 revision of Batman's origin (see Batman: Year One), Andrew Helfer rewrote Two-Face's history to match.[9] This origin, presented in Batman Annual (vol. 1) #14, served to emphasize Dent's status as a tragic character, with a back story that included an abusive, alcoholic father, and early struggles with bipolar disorder and paranoia. It was also established, in Batman: Year One, that the pre-accident Harvey Dent was one of Batman's earliest allies. He had clear ties to both Batman and Commissioner Gordon, making him an unsettling and personal foe for both men.[10]

Fictional character biography[edit]

Acid is thrown onto Harvey Dent's face in Batman: The Long Halloween.

Pre-Crisis[edit]

The Pre-Crisis version of Two-Face is Harvey Dent, Gotham City's handsome young District Attorney. A mobster throws acid in his face during a trial, scarring half his face. Driven insane by his reflection, he renames himself Two-Face and goes on a crime spree, deciding with a flip of his lucky coin whether to break the law or perform acts of charity.[11] Batman and Robin eventually capture him, and he is rehabilitated thanks to plastic surgery.[12] Later stories, however, depict him as returning to crime after being re-disfigured.

Post-Crisis[edit]

The Post-Crisis version of Harvey Dent is depicted as having had an unhappy childhood; growing under his mentally ill father, who beats him regularly, often deciding whether or not to brutalize his son based on a flip of his lucky coin. The abuse instills in Dent his lifelong struggle with free will and his eventual inability to make choices on his own, relying on the coin to make all of his decisions. Dent is diagnosed with bipolar disorder and paranoid schizophrenia at a young age, but manages to hide his illnesses and, thanks to an unyielding work ethic, rises up through the ranks of Gotham City's district attorney's office until, at age 26, he becomes the youngest DA in the city's history. Gordon even suspected that Dent could be Batman but discarded this suspicion when he realized that he lacked the financial resources of Batman.

Dent forges an alliance with Police Captain James Gordon and Batman to rid Gotham of organized crime. Mob boss Carmine Falcone bribes corrupt Assistant District Attorney Vernon Fields to provide his lieutenant Sal Maroni, whom Dent is trying for murder, with sulfuric acid; Maroni throws the acid in Dent's face during a cross-examination, horribly scarring the left side of Dent's face. Dent escapes from the hospital and reinvents himself as the gangster Two-Face. He scars one side of his father's coin, and uses it to decide whether to commit a crime. Eventually, Two-Face takes his revenge on Fields and Maroni, but is captured by Batman, leading to his incarceration in Arkham Asylum.[13]

During the Batman: Dark Victory story arc, the serial killer Hangman targets various cops who assisted in Harvey Dent's rise to the D.A.'s office. Two-Face gathers Gotham's criminals to assist in the destruction of the city's crime lords. After a climactic struggle in the Batcave, Two-Face is betrayed by the Joker, who shoots at Dent, causing him to fall into a chasm, presumably to his death. Batman admits in the aftermath that, even if Two-Face has survived, Harvey is gone forever.[14]

During a much later period, Two-Face is revealed to have murdered the father of Batman's ward, Jason Todd. When attempting to apprehend Two-Face, Jason briefly has the criminal at his mercy, but lets Two-Face's punishment be decided by the law.[15] Two-Face similarly serves as a 'baptism by fire' for Tim Drake. When Two-Face has Batman at his mercy, Tim dons the Robin suit to save Batman.

In Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth, Arkham's doctors replace Dent's coin with a die and eventually a tarot deck; but rather than becoming self-reliant, Dent is now unable to make even the smallest of decisions—such as going to the bathroom. Batman returns the coin, telling Two-Face to use it to decide whether to kill him. Batman leaves safely, but it is heavily implied that Two-Face, for the first time in his life, made his own decision to let Batman live.[16][17]

In the No Man's Land storyline, in which Gotham is devastated by an earthquake, Two-Face claims a portion of the ruined city, takes up residence in Gotham City Hall, and forms a temporary alliance with Gordon to share certain territory. His empire is brought down by Bane (employed by Lex Luthor), who destroys Two-Face's gang during his destruction of the city's Hall of Records. Two-Face kidnaps Gordon and puts him on trial for his activities after Gotham City is declared a "No Man's Land", with Two-Face as both judge and prosecutor for Gordon's illegal alliance with him; but Gordon plays upon Two-Face's split psyche to demand Harvey Dent as his defense attorney. Dent cross-examines Two-Face and wins an acquittal for Gordon, determining that Two-Face has effectively blackmailed Gordon by implying that he had committed murders to aid the Commissioner.[18]

In Gotham Central, Two-Face meets detective Renee Montoya. Montoya reaches the Dent persona in Two-Face and is kind to him. He falls in love with her, though the romance is one-sided.[18] Eventually in the Gotham Central series, he outs her as a lesbian and frames her for murder, hoping that if he takes everything from her, she will be left with no choice but to be with him. She is furious, and the two fight for control of his gun until Batman intervenes, putting Two-Face back in Arkham.[19]

In the Batman: Two-Face - Crime and Punishment one-shot comic book, Two-Face captures his own father, planning to humiliate and kill him on live television for the years of abuse that he suffered. This story reveals that, despite his apparent hatred for his father, Dent still supports him, paying for an expensive home rather than allowing him to live in a slum. At the end of the book, the Dent and Two-Face personalities argue in thought, Two-Face calling Dent "spineless". Dent proves Two-Face wrong, choosing to jump off a building and commit suicide just to put a stop to his alter ego's crime spree. Two-Face is surprised when the coin flip comes up scarred, but abides by the decision and jumps. Batman catches him, but the shock of the fall seems to (at least temporarily) destroy the Two-Face aspect of his psyche.[20]

In Batman: Two-Face Strikes Twice!, Two-Face is at odds with his ex-wife Gilda Grace Dent, as he believes their marriage failed because he was unable to give her children. She later marries Paul Janus (a reference to the Roman god of doors, who had two faces). Two-Face attempts to frame Janus as a criminal by kidnapping him and replacing him with a stand-in, whom Two-Face "disfigures" with makeup. Batman eventually catches Two-Face, and Gilda and Janus reunite. Years later, Gilda gives birth to twins, prompting Two-Face to escape once more and take the twins hostage, as he erroneously believes them to be conceived by Janus using an experimental fertility drug. The end of the book reveals that Two-Face is the twins' natural father.[21]

Hush[edit]

In the Batman: Hush storyline, his face is repaired by plastic surgery, and only the Harvey Dent persona exists. He takes the law into his own hands twice: once by using his ability to manipulate the legal system to free the Joker, and then again by shooting the serial killer Hush. He manipulates the courts into setting him free, as Gotham's prosecutors would not attempt to charge him without a body.

Return to villainy[edit]

In the Batman story arc Batman: Face the Face, that started in Detective Comics #817, and was part of DC's One Year Later storyline, it is revealed that, at Batman's request and with his training, Harvey Dent becomes a vigilante protector of Gotham City in most of Batman's absence of nearly a year. He is reluctant to take the job, but Batman assures him that it would serve as atonement for his past crimes. After a month of training, they fight the Firebug and Mr. Freeze, before Batman leaves for a year. Dent enjoys his new role, but his methods are seemingly more extreme and less refined than Batman's. Upon Batman's return, Dent begins to feel unnecessary and unappreciated, which prompts the return of the "Two-Face" persona (seen and heard by Dent through hallucinations). In Face the Face, his frustration is compounded by a series of mysterious murders that seem to have been committed by Two-Face; the villains the KGBeast, the Magpie, the Ventriloquist and Scarface, and Orca are all shot twice in the head with a double-barreled pistol. When Batman confronts Dent about these deaths, asking him to confirm that he was not responsible, Dent refuses to give a definite answer. He then detonates a bomb in his apartment and leaves Batman dazed as he flees.

Despite escaping the explosion physically unscathed, Dent suffers a crisis of conscience and a mental battle with his "Two-Face" personality. Although Batman later uncovers evidence that exonerates Dent for the murders, establishing that he was framed as revenge for his efforts against new crime boss Warren White, a.k.a. the Great White Shark, it is too late to save him. Prompted by resentment and a paranoid reaction to Batman's questioning, Dent scars half his face with nitric acid and a scalpel, becoming Two-Face once again.[22] Blaming Batman for his return, Two-Face immediately goes on a rampage, threatening to destroy the Gotham Zoo (having retained two of every animal—including two humans) before escaping to fight Batman another day. Batman subsequently confronts White, while acknowledging that he cannot attack White, as there is no explicit evidence supporting Batman's deductions, vowing to inform Two-Face of White's actions when they next face each other.[23]

On the cover of Justice League of America (vol. 2) #23, Two-Face is shown as a member of the new Injustice League. He can be seen in Salvation Run. He appears in Battle for the Cowl: The Underground, which shows the effects of Batman's death on his enemies. In Judd Winick's Long Shadow arc, Two-Face realizes that there is another person as Batman.[24] He hires a teleporter and manages to infiltrate the Batcave. When the new Batman investigates the cave, Two-Face ambushes him with tranquilizer darts, and in a hallucination he sees Dent in a red and black Two-Face themed Batman costume.[25] Alfred Pennyworth saves the hero from Two-Face's torture after subduing his accomplice, and with his help Batman convinces Two-Face that he is the real, original Dark Knight, informing Dent that his problem is that he cannot imagine Batman changing because he himself is incapable of seeing the world in anything other than black and white.[26] In Streets of Gotham, Two-Face has been at odds with Gotham's latest district attorney Kate Spencer, also known as the vigilante Manhunter. Two-Face has recently been driven out of Gotham City by Jeremiah Arkham.[27]

The New 52[edit]

In September 2011, The New 52 rebooted DC's continuity. In this new timeline, Two Face's origin is revised significantly. Harvey Dent is a successful defense attorney whose clientele includes twin sisters from the McKillen crime family, Shannon and Erin. The sisters coerce Dent to become their family's legal retainer for life. They then place a contract on James Gordon and his entire family, despite Dent's protestations. The Gordons survive the attempt on their lives, but Dent, trapped by attorney-client confidentiality, is unable to dissuade the McKillens from continuing their lethal vendetta. The violent attempt on the Gordons' lives prompts Bruce Wayne to use his resources to initiate and fund Dent's campaign for district attorney. Dent becomes D.A. and has the McKillen sisters prosecuted and sentenced to life in prison. After Shannon commits suicide, Erin escapes by switching places with her sister's corpse. Blaming Dent for her sister's death, Erin breaks into Dent's house, kills Gilda in front of him, and pours acid on his face, transforming him into Two-Face.

Several years later, Erin McKillen returns to Gotham City to kill Two-Face, and thus reassert her control of her family's criminal operations. Her return sparks a climactic battle between her, Two-Face, and Batman. Two-Face scars McKillen with the same acid she used on him, but Batman stops him from killing her. Batman and Two-Face continue battling, with Batman trying to convince his foe to end his vendetta. Two-Face then calls Batman, "Bruce", revealing that he knows Batman's secret identity. Two-Face reveals that he struggled internally for quite some time over whether to kill his former friend, but decided not to because it would have violated his sense of justice. He disappears after the battle and Batman is unable to track him. Several panels of Batman and Robin #28 imply that Two-Face commits suicide by shooting himself in the head.

DC Rebirth[edit]

In the DC Rebirth rebooted universe, Batman decides to cure Two-Face, doing whatever it takes. Following a confrontation with Two-Face and his henchmen - Killer Moth, Firefly, and Black Spider - Batman takes Two-Face into his custody, until they both have to fight KGBeast. They defeat KGBeast, but are badly injured. Batman nurses Two-Face back to health, but Two-Face suspects Batman of trying to betray him and rubs acid in his eyes.[28]

Two-Face and Batman mend their relationship somewhat in order to fight KGBeast, the Penguin, and Black Mask. Batman tells Two-Face that he can cure Two-Face's split personality. Two-Face does not trust Batman to help him, however, and so threatens to destroy Gotham City with poison gas unless Batman gives him the cure. In the end, Batman injects Two-Face with the "cure", which turns out to be a sedative that renders Two-Face unconscious. Batman then takes Two-Face back to Arkham.

In the Deface the Face story arc, Two Face goes to Batman for help. Harvey Dent had murdered a man who he could not convict in trial. Two Face says,"...Harvey's the good one. He has to be. Otherwise, What am I?" Two-Face then decides to help Batman and Gordon bring down the evil terrorist group, Kobra.

In the Watchmen sequel Doomsday Clock, Two-Face is among the villains who attend the underground meeting held by the Riddler.[29] In Harley Quinn: Rebirth, while Harley Quinn's Gang of Harleys is trying to find information about Man-Bat, they run into Two-Face while at Arkham Asylum, where he makes threats towards the group.

Characterization[edit]

Powers and abilities[edit]

Before his transformation into Two-Face, Harvey Dent had a successful career as Gotham's upstanding district attorney, proficient in nearly all matters pertaining to criminal law.

Following his disfigurement, he became obsessed with the number two and the concept of duality, and thus staged crimes centered around the number two—such as robbing buildings with 2 in the address or staging events that will take place at 10:22 p.m. (2222 in military time). Two-Face has also proven to be a genius in criminal planning, and has constantly demonstrated a high-level of intelligence in plotting heists as a brilliant and respected mastermind in the criminal underworld. In addition, Two-Face is a skilled marksman, and regularly used a variety of firearms such as pistols, shotguns, grenade launchers, Tommy guns, knives and rocket launchers during his battles with Batman. To further improve his proficiency in the use of firearms, Two-Face hired the sharpshooting assassin Deathstroke to train him.[30] He primarily wields dual pistols, and has become dangerously skilled with them.

The Batman: Face the Face story-arc reveals that Batman, shortly before leaving Gotham for a year, trains Dent extensively in detective work and hand-to-hand combat.

Family[edit]

This section details various members of Harvey Dent's family across various interpretations of the Batman mythos.

  • Gilda Grace Dent – Gilda is Harvey's wife in most comic-book incarnations. Gilda wanted to have children with Harvey, but his busy schedule precluded this. This led Gilda to become the serial killer known as Holiday, who killed several key members of Carmine Falcone's criminal empire. Gilda fled after Two-Face's first arrest and disappeared. Two-Face constantly denies the chance for plastic surgery and a life with Gilda again, but has stated that Harvey Dent is a married man. In the New 52 reboot, Gilda is a socialite whom Bruce Wayne introduces to Harvey at a graduation party. She is killed in front of Harvey by Erin McKillen.[31]
  • Christopher Dent – In Batman: Two-Face - Crime and Punishment, Harvey Dent's father is renamed Christopher Dent, although he is once again characterized as a mentally ill alcoholic who frequently abused his son. Harvey represses this trauma for years, fueling the inner torment that eventually turns him into Two-Face.[20]
  • Murray DentBatman: Jekyll & Hyde reveals that, when he was a child, Harvey Dent had an older brother, Murray Dent, who died in a fire because his brother was too scared to save him. The comics explain that Murray is Harvey's second personality, and that Harvey's father abused him because he blamed him for Murray's death.[32]

Other characters named Two-Face[edit]

Wilkins[edit]

The first impostor was Wilkins, Harvey Dent's butler, who uses makeup to suggest that Dent had suffered a relapse and disfigured his own face. This would give Wilkins the cover to commit crimes as Two-Face.[33]

Paul Sloane[edit]

Paul Sloane becomes the second impostor of Two-Face.[34] An actor, Sloane is disfigured by an accident on the set of a biography film about Two-Face. This occurred when a prop boy working on the film got jealous at the fact that his girlfriend developed a crush on Sloane. This causes the prop man to switch out the water with actual acid that was to be used for the trial scene. Sloane's mind snaps, and he begins to think that he is Dent. Sloane recovers some of his own personality, but continues to commit crimes as Two-Face. Sloane is reused in later Earth-Two specific stories as Two-Face II of Earth-Two where the original Earth-Two Two-Face remains healed.[35] Sloane is revived in the current continuity as a successor Two-Face,[36] though not replacing Dent as done in the earlier Earth-Two specific storyline.

After the Crisis on Infinite Earths event, the Paul Sloane character, with a near-identical history to the Pre-Crisis version, appears in Detective Comics #580-581. In Double Image, Harvey Dent (as Two-Face) employs the Crime Doctor to re-disfigure Sloane. Dent does this out of jealous bitterness and the hope that Sloane would commit crimes based on the number two, thus confusing Batman. At the end of the story, Sloane is once again healed physically and mentally.[37]

Paul Sloane is introduced into Post-Zero Hour continuity as a criminal called the Charlatan in Detective Comics #777 (February 2003). In this incarnation, Sloan (now spelled without a silent e) had been hired by the Joker, the Penguin, the Riddler, the Mad Hatter, the Scarecrow, and Killer Moth to take Two-Face's place in a scheme to kill Batman. They had originally offered Two-Face the part in the scheme, but his coin landed on the non-scarred side. During his impersonation of Two-Face, Batman discovered that this Two-Face was an impostor when he killed a security guard without consulting the coin. When the real Two-Face learns about this, he captures Sloan and disfigures his face. Scarecrow then experiments on him with fear toxins. Driven insane and deprived of fear, the Charlatan becomes obsessed with both getting revenge on the criminals who hired him and completing his mission to kill Batman. Charlatan is defeated by Batman and incarcerated at Arkham Asylum.[36]

George Blake[edit]

The third impostor of Two-Face is petty criminal George Blake who passed himself off as a manager of an anti-crime exhibition. However, he is not actually disfigured, but is wearing make-up. Furthermore, his makeup is worn on the opposite side of his face to Harvey Dent or Paul Sloane, which easily enabled Batman to identify him as an impostor. Batman defeats George Blake and clears Harvey Dent's name.[38]

Batman as Two-Face[edit]

Also noteworthy is a 1968 story where Batman himself is temporarily turned into Two-Face via a potion.[39]

Harvey Dent[edit]

As mentioned above, Harvey Dent does return as Two-Face in the 1970s.

With the establishment of the multiverse, the Two-Face of Earth-Two (i.e., the character seen in the original Golden Age stories) is said to be Harvey Kent, who had not relapsed following his cure.[35] The last appearance of the Golden Age version of Two-Face was in Superman Family #211 (October 1981), depicting him as a guest at the marriage of Bruce Wayne and Selina Kyle (Catwoman). He meets Lois Lane and Clark Kent, and his shared name with the latter creates confusion.[35]

Two-Face-Two[edit]

In Batman #700, which establishes Terry McGinnis as part of the DC Universe canon, it is revealed that Two-Face-Two kidnapped the infant Terry, along with an 80-year-old Carter Nichols, and tried to disfigure them in the style of the Joker. His plans were foiled by Damian Wayne, the fifth Robin and Batman's biological son. Unlike the original Two-Face, this version of the character was born deformed with a second face, rather than being scarred by acid or fire, and flips two coins instead of one. He is then killed when a machine falls on him.[40] Another Two-Face-Two is briefly mentioned during the course of the DC One Million storyline, with the Batman of the 853rd century comments how this villain was defeated when the second Batman convinced him that the law of averages proved his coin-tossing would ultimately cause him to make more 'good' decisions than he would 'bad' ones.

Other versions[edit]

A number of alternate universes in DC Comics publications allow writers to introduce variations on Two-Face, in which the character's origins, behavior, and morality differ from the mainstream setting.

In other media[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Gotham Season 2 Features 'Serialized' Story; Bill Cosbey Getting Batman Credit". Screen Rant.
  2. ^ Daniels, Les (1999). Batman: The Complete History. San Francisco: Chronicle Books. p. 45. ISBN 978-0811824705. Nearly everyone seems to agree that Two-Face was Kane's brainchild exclusively
  3. ^ a b Detective Comics #66 (August 1942)
  4. ^ "Meet The Criminal Two-Face!". DC Comics. 2015-05-19. Retrieved August 11, 2017.
  5. ^ "Two-Face is Number 12". Comics.ign.com. Retrieved 2010-12-29.
  6. ^ "Comic Book DB - Two Face". Comic Book Database. Retrieved 2008-05-28.
  7. ^ Fleisher, Michael L. (1976). The Encyclopedia of Comic Book Heroes, Volume 1: Batman. Macmillan Publishing Co. pp. 359–363. ISBN 0-02-538700-6. Retrieved 29 March 2020.
  8. ^ Kane, Bob (1989). Batman and Me. Foestfille, CA: Eclipse Books. pp. 108–110. ISBN 978-1560600176.
  9. ^ Miller, Frank (w), Mazzucchelli, David (p). Batman: Year One #4 (March – June 1987), DC Comics, 0930289331
  10. ^ H (2003-12-23). "The Comic Treadmill: Batman 454, 456, Annual 14 (1990)". Comic Tread Mill. Retrieved 2008-05-28.
  11. ^ Rovin, Jeff (1987). The Encyclopedia of Supervillains. New York: Facts on File. p. 355. ISBN 0-8160-1356-X.
  12. ^ Bill Finger (w), Bob Kane (p), Jerry Robinson (i), Ira Schnapp (let), Whitney Ellsworth (ed). "The Crimes of Two-Face" Detective Comics 66 (August 1942), DC Comics
  13. ^ Loeb, Joseph, Sale, Tim (w), Sale, Tim (a). Batman: The Long Halloween: 368 (1996-1997), DC Comics, 1563894696
  14. ^ Batman: Dark Victory #14
  15. ^ Batman #409
  16. ^ Morrison, Grant (w), McKean, Dave (p), McKean, Dave (i). Arkham Asylum: A Serious House on Serious Earth (hardcover edition for April Fool's reference): 128 (1989), DC Comics
  17. ^ Johnson, Craig (2005-02-23). "Arkham Asylum 15th Anniversary HC Review". Comics Bulletin. Retrieved 2008-05-28.
  18. ^ a b "No Man's Land (comics)". Comic Vine. Archived from the original on April 11, 2008. Retrieved May 9, 2008.
  19. ^ Gotham Central TPB vol. 2 or HC vol. 1
  20. ^ a b Batman: Two-Face - Crime and Punishment
  21. ^ Batman: Two-Face Strikes Twice!
  22. ^ Batman (vol. 1) #653 (July 2006)
  23. ^ James Robinson (w), Don Kramer (p), Wayne Faucher (i), John Kalisz (col), Travis Lanham (let), Dan DiDio (ed). "Face the Face, Conclusion" Batman #654 (August 2006)
  24. ^ Batman (vol. 1) #689 (August 2009)
  25. ^ Batman (vol. 1) #690 (September 2009)
  26. ^ Batman (vol. 1) #691 (October 2009)
  27. ^ Streets of Gotham
  28. ^ All-Star Batman #1
  29. ^ Doomsday Clock #6 (July 2018). DC Comics.
  30. ^ Nightwing (vol. 2) #149
  31. ^ Batman: Dark Victory #11 (September 2000)
  32. ^ Batman: Jekyll & Hyde
  33. ^ Batman #50 (December 1948)
  34. ^ Schelly, William (2013). American Comic Book Chronicles: The 1950s. TwoMorrows Publishing. p. 51. ISBN 9781605490540.
  35. ^ a b c Superman Family #211
  36. ^ a b Detective Comics #777
  37. ^ Detective Comics #580-581
  38. ^ Detective Comics #187 (September 1952)
  39. ^ World's Finest Comics #173
  40. ^ Batman #700

External links[edit]

  • Two-Face at the DC Database Project
  • Mastracci, Sharon (2017-03-01). "Public service in popular culture: the administrative discretion of commissioner gordon and harvey dent". International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior. 17 (3): 367–388. doi:10.1108/IJOTB-17-03-2014-B005. ISSN 1093-4537.


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