Tyler metropolitan area

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Tyler
Metropolitan Statistical Area
Clockwise: Tyler skyline with Plaza Tower at right and People's National Bank office building in center, Cotton Belt Depot, Caldwell Zoo, Chamblee Rose Garden, Smith County Courthouse, Goodman Home.
Clockwise: Tyler skyline with Plaza Tower at right and People's National Bank office building in center, Cotton Belt Depot, Caldwell Zoo, Chamblee Rose Garden, Smith County Courthouse, Goodman Home.
Country United States
State Texas
Principal cities
Area
 • Metro 950 sq mi (2,460 km2)
Population (2010)
 • Density 130/sq mi (50/km2)
 • Urban 130,247 (US: 247th)
 • Urban density 1,782.0/sq mi (688.0/km2)
 • MSA 216,080
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)

The Tyler Metropolitan Statistical area, centered on Tyler, Texas, has a combined population of 216,080 according to the 2010 census. Tyler is the principal city of the MSA and the metropolitan contains one county which is Smith.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Towns[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 950 square miles (2,500 km2), of which 921 square miles (2,390 km2) is land and 28 square miles (73 km2) (3.0%) is water.[1]

The county infrastructure includes some 1,180 miles (1,900 km) of two lane county road. 70% of these county roads were rated "bad" or "poor" in 2004. The county Commissioners Court appointed a new county engineer in 2005 and initiated an aggressive reconstruction campaign. After the election of 2006, this reconstruction campaign was cut back by the Commissioners Court. During this period a controversial pay increase for commissioners and the county judge was passed by a 3-2 vote. After heated protests from the public the pay rates were eventually rolled back and new legislation was proposed in the state legislature to prohibit commissioners and county judges from authorizing raises for themselves during their first term of office.

Major highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 4,292
1860 13,392 212.0%
1870 16,532 23.4%
1880 21,863 32.2%
1890 28,324 29.6%
1900 37,370 31.9%
1910 41,746 11.7%
1920 46,769 12.0%
1930 53,123 13.6%
1940 69,090 30.1%
1950 74,701 8.1%
1960 86,350 15.6%
1970 97,096 12.4%
1980 128,366 32.2%
1990 151,309 17.9%
2000 174,706 15.5%
Est. 2014 218,842
U.S. Decennial Census[2]
1850–2010[3] 2010–2014[4]

As of the census[5] of 2010, there were 209,714 people and 76,427 households residing in the county. The population density was 227.6 people per square mile (73/km²). There were 87,309 housing units. The racial makeup of the county was 70.1% White, 17.9% Black or African American, 0.5% American Indian and Alaska Native, 1.2% Asian, and 2.0% persons reporting two or more races. 17.2% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 76,427 households, out of which 34.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.8% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.7% were non-families. 25.3% of all households were made up of a householder living alone. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.13.

The median income for a household in the county was $46,139. The per capita income for the county was $25,374. About 15.4% of families and 13.80% of the population were below the poverty line.

In the county, the population was spread out with 26.60% under the age of 18, 9.80% from 18 to 24, 27.40% from 25 to 44, 22.10% from 45 to 64, and 14.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 92.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.90 males.

The county has been unable to house approximately 30% of its growing inmate population since 2000 in its own facilities and spends approximately 10% of its annual budget (estimated to be $62 Million in 2007) for housing prisoners in out of county facilities. However, this figure should be adjusted for the fact that the county currently spends $35.00 per day housing prisoners in its own facility, and $40.00 for housing them in other counties. The real cost being $5.00 per day, and the cost for 2007 adjusted to $638,000.00. According to official state of Texas records Smith county now incarcerates its residents at a rate twice as high as the state average.

Colleges and universities[edit]

The Riter Tower at University of Texas at Tyler

Tyler's higher education institutions include the University of Texas at Tyler and the University of Texas Health Center at Tyler, both part of the University of Texas System, as well as Tyler Junior College and Texas College.

Economy[edit]

People's National Bank office building in downtown Tyler
Chamber of Commerce office in downtown Tyler

In addition to its role in the rose-growing industry, Tyler is the headquarters for Brookshire Grocery Company, which operates Brookshire's, Fresh and Super 1 Foods, and Ole! supermarkets in three states (Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas). The company's main distribution center is located in south Tyler, while SouthWest Foods, a subsidiary that processes dairy products, is located just northeast of the city. Adams Engineering has also made its headquarters in Tyler.

The manufacturing sector includes:

Also produced in Tyler are John Soules Foods' fajita and other meat products, Greenberg's smoked turkeys, Distant Lands Coffee Roasters coffee, Tyler Candle Co. jar candles, Tyler Products, and a variety of small, high-tech businesses, including SEO Skyrocket, Synthesizers.com, F3 Technology Solutions, Wood Networks, Group M7, CBI, Power-Up, and Arrick Robotics.

Tyler is also a major medical center which serves the city, as well as the surrounding East Texas area.

According to the City's 2012-2013 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[6] the top ten employers in the city are:

# Employer # of Employees
1 Trinity Mother Frances Health System 3,775
2 East Texas Medical Center 3,153
3 Brookshire Grocery Company 2,599
4 Tyler Independent School District 2,468
5 Trane 1,500
6 SuddenLink 1,500
7 Walmart 1,311
8 The University of Texas at Tyler 1,121
9 University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler 925
10 Tyler Junior College 862

Recreation and tourism[edit]

Annually, the Texas Rose Festival draws thousands of tourists to Tyler.[7] The festival, which celebrates the role of the rose-growing industry in the local economy, is held in October and features a parade, the coronation of the Rose Queen, and other civic events. The Rose Museum features the history of the Festival. Tyler is home to Caldwell Zoo, several local museums, Lake Palestine, Lake Tyler, and numerous golf courses and country clubs.[8] A few miles away in Flint, TX is The WaterPark @ The Villages, a year-round, indoor water park. There is also an "Azalea Trail" in Tyler, which are two officially designated routes within the city that showcase homes or other landscaped venues adorned with azalea shrubs.[9] Tyler State Park is a few miles away where visitors can camp, canoe, and paddle boat on the lake. Activities include picnicking; camping; boating (motors allowed - 5 mph speed limit); boat rentals; fishing; birding; hiking; mountain biking and hiking trails; lake swimming (in unsupervised swimming area); and nature study. The Smith County Historical Society operates a museum and archives in the old Carnegie Library.[10] The East Texas State Fair is held annually in Tyler.[11] Lake Tyler was the location of the HGTV Dream Home contest in 2005. The 6,500 square feet (600 m²) house briefly boosted tourism and interest in the community. It subsequently was sold at public auction in January, 2008, for 1.325 million dollars.[12]

Transportation[edit]

Aerial photo of Tyler Pounds Regional Airport in Tyler, Texas, shot by Butler Planning Services on 9/9/2005.

As with much of modern America, the automobile is the most common form of transportation. Tyler is a nexus of several major highways. Interstate 20 runs along the north edge of the city going east and west, U.S. Highway 69 runs north-south through the center of town and State Highway 64 runs east-west through the city. Tyler also has access to U.S. Highway 271, State Highway 31, State Highway 155, and State Highway 110. Loop 323 was established in 1957 and originally encircled the city, which has continued to grow outside of this loop. Loop 49 was designed to be an "outer loop" around the city and currently runs from State Highway 110 to Interstate 20 west of Tyler. Future segments will extend Loop 49 to Interstate 20 east of Tyler and to other East Texas cities.

Public transportation[edit]

Tyler Transit provides customers with public transportation service within the City of Tyler. The buses run daily, excluding Sundays and holidays. Tyler Transit offers customers the option to purchase tickets, tokens, or passes at the Tyler Transit office, located at 210 E. Oakwood Street inside the Cotton Belt Railroad Depot at the main transfer point. The City of Tyler paratransit service is a shared-ride, public transportation service. Requests for service must be made the day before the service is needed. Trips can be scheduled up to 14 days in advance. ADA complimentary paratransit service is provided to all origins and destinations within the service area defined as the city limits of Tyler. [13] Greyhound Lines bus service is available through a downtown terminal.

Via air[edit]

Tyler Pounds Regional Airport offers service to Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport via American Eagle and to Houston's George Bush Intercontinental Airport via United Express.

Via train[edit]

Tyler was the hub for a series of short-line railroads which later evolved into the St. Louis Southwestern Railway, better known as "The Cotton Belt Route". This line later became part of the Southern Pacific Railroad, which itself merged with the Union Pacific Railroad, which continues to serve the city today. No passenger train service to Tyler has occurred since April 1956, but Amtrak runs through the city of Mineola, a short distance north of Tyler.

Walkability[edit]

A 2014 study by Walk Score ranked Tyler with a walkability score of 32 (out of 100) with some amenities within walking distance.[14]

Healthcare[edit]

Hospitals located in Tyler include East Texas Medical Center, Trinity Mother Frances Health System, University of Texas Health Center at Tyler, and Texas Spine & Joint Hospital. There are also many clinics including the Direct Care Clinic.

Media[edit]

Currently, 18 media outlets and one newspaper are located in Tyler, as well as many more in the surrounding areas.

Newspaper[edit]

Television[edit]

VHF/UHF Channel
Call Letters
Network
7 KLTV ABC
19 KYTX CBS
51 KFXK-TV FOX
56 KETK NBC

Radio[edit]

AM stations[edit]

Frequency
Call Letters
Format
Name
600 KTBB News/Talk
1330 KGLD Gospel The Light
1490 KYZS

FM stations[edit]

Frequency
Call Letters
Format
Name
88.7 KLOVE Christian Contemporary KLOVE
89.5 KVNE Christian Contemporary Encouragement FM
91.3 KGLY Religious
92.1 KRWR Sports ESPN East Texas
93.1 KTYL Hot Adult Contemporary Mix 93.1
96.1 KKTX Classic Rock Classic Rock 96.1
96.7 KOYE Spanish La Invasora
99.3 KAPW Spanish Pop Mega 99.3
101.5 KNUE Country
102.3 KLJT Top 40 The Breeze
102.7 KBLZ Urban Contemporary The Blaze
104.1 KKUS Classic Country The Ranch
106.5 KOOI Classic Hits Sunny 106.5
107.3 KISX Urban Adult Contemporary Hot1073Jamz

Sports[edit]

UT Tyler Women's Basketball Team

College and university teams[edit]

Baseball teams[edit]

  • Tyler Elbertas (1912)
  • Tyler Trojans (1924–1929, 1931, 1935–1940, 1946–1950)
  • Tyler Sports (1932)
  • Tyler Governors (1933–1934)
  • Tyler East Texans (1950–1953)
  • Tyler Tigers (1954–1955)
  • Tyler Wildcatters (1994–1997)
  • Tyler Roughnecks (2001)

Football[edit]

  • East Texas Twisters (2004)

Road races[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved May 10, 2015. 
  2. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 10, 2015. 
  3. ^ "Texas Almanac: Population History of Counties from 1850–2010" (PDF). Texas Almanac. Retrieved May 10, 2015. 
  4. ^ Cite error: The named reference QF was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  5. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  6. ^ City of Tyler 2012-2013 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, p. 136. Retrieved 2014-04-11.
  7. ^ Until Now Archived March 21, 2012, at the Wayback Machine.
  8. ^ Navarro, Edward (2006). "It's Tee Time in Tyler". Images of Tyler (Journal Communications, Inc.) 1: 57. 
  9. ^ "Frequently Asked Questions". Tyler Azalea Trail. Retrieved 2012-12-11. 
  10. ^ "Smith County Historical Society". Smith County Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-12-11. 
  11. ^ "East Texas State Fair". Etstatefair.com. Retrieved 2012-12-11. 
  12. ^ "HGTV Dream Home Sold, $1.325 Million". Kltv.com. Retrieved 2012-12-11. 
  13. ^ "Tyler Transit". Cityoftyler.org. Retrieved 2012-12-11. 
  14. ^ "City and Neighborhood Rankings". Walk Score. 2014. Retrieved April 11, 2014.