Typhoon Chaba (2010)

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Typhoon Chaba (Katring)
Typhoon (JMA scale)
Category 4 (Saffir–Simpson scale)
Chaba Oct 28 2010 0440Z.jpg
Typhoon Chaba approaching Okinawa at peak strength on 28 October
Formed 20 October 2010
Dissipated 1 November 2010
(Extratropical after 30 October)
Highest winds 10-minute sustained: 175 km/h (110 mph)
1-minute sustained: 215 km/h (130 mph)
Lowest pressure 930 hPa (mbar); 27.46 inHg
Fatalities None reported
Areas affected Japan
Part of the 2010 Pacific typhoon season

Typhoon Chaba, known in the Philippines as Typhoon Katring, was the first typhoon to impact Japan since Typhoon Melor in October 2009. Chaba means Hibiscus in Thai.[1]

Meteorological history[edit]

Map plotting the track and intensity of the storm according to the Saffir–Simpson scale

Early on 20 October, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) upgraded an area of low pressure into a tropical depression.[2] Later that day, the JMA reported that the tropical depression slightly intensified.[3] The next day, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center started monitoring the system as tropical depression 16W.[4] On 23 October, the system entered the Philippine Area of responsibility and the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) started monitoring the system as Tropical Depression "Katring"[5] On 24 October, the JMA and JTWC upgraded the tropical depression into a tropical storm and the JMA named it "Chaba".[6][7] On 25 October, the JMA further upgraded the storm into a Severe Tropical Storm.[8] Later that day, the JTWC upgraded the storm into a Category 1 Typhoon.[9] Early on 26 October, the JMA further upgraded the storm into a Typhoon.[10] Early on 27 October, the JTWC upgraded the typhoon into a Category 2 Typhoon.[11] Later that day, the JTWC further upgraded the typhoon into a Category 3 Typhoon.[12] The following day JTWC upgraded the system into a Category 4 Typhon.[13] Later that day, the JTWC downgraded Chaba into a Category 3 Typhoon.[14] Early on 29 October, the JTWC further downgraded Chaba into a Category 2 Typhoon, while the JTWC downgraded it into a Category 1 Typhoon.[15] Early on 30 October, the JTWC reported that Chaba had transitioned into an extratropical cyclone. During the afternoon of 30 October, the JMA downgraded Chaba to a remnant low as passed near Japan. The remnants of Chaba continued to weaken as it moved northeast, but strengthened again in approaching the Gulf of Alaska into a major storm[16] with 55-knot winds,[17] kicking up 40–50 foot waves, with pressure as low as 939 mb.[18] The storm's center came ashore in the vicinity of Cordova, Alaska on 1 November, but not before pulling an atmospheric river of moisture into the American Pacific Northwest, setting a record[19] for that date of precipitation in Seattle.

Preparations and impact[edit]

In preparation for Chaba, more than 160 flights were cancelled.[20] Islanders in southern Japan started sandbagging doors and reinforcing windows as Chaba churned closer.[21] Strong winds and heavy rains lashed through Okinawa and there were a lot of concerns about the island of Amami which was in the typhoon's path.[22] Over 257 residents were evacuated from the Amami Islands to higher grounds, schools and town halls which were converted into evacuation centers.[1] Late on 29 October, Chaba approached Amami island region in Kagoshima. Strong winds injured five people and felled electric poles cutting electricity supply.[23] Landfall was predicted on the main island of Honshu.[24]

On Minami-Daito Island in Okinawa Prefecture, winds from the typhoon gusted up to 160 km/h (99 mph), resulting in roughly 500 residences losing power. Five people were also injured across the island.[23] Chaba dumped nearly 50 mm (2.0 in) of rain per hour across southern Japan. The Japan Racing Association postponed races in Tokyo until 1 November because of the typhoon.[25]

Retirement[edit]

The name Katring was subsequently retired after the usage of this name and eventually replaced with the name Kanor, later changed to Karding.[26]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Japan evacuates islands as typhoon nears". Fairfax Media. 29 October 2010. Retrieved 29 October 2010.  |first1= missing |last1= in Authors list (help)
  2. ^ "JMA Tropical Weather Outlook for Pre-Tropical Depression 16W". Japan Meteorological Agency. Archived from the original on 20 October 2010. Retrieved 23 October 2010. 
  3. ^ "JMA Tropical Weather Outlook for Pre-Tropical Depression 16W". Japan Meteorological Agency. Archived from the original on 20 October 2010. Retrieved 23 October 2010. 
  4. ^ "JTWC Tropical Depression 16W Warning 01". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Archived from the original on 21 October 2010. Retrieved 25 October 2010. 
  5. ^ "PAGASA Tropical Depression Katring Advisory 01". Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration. Archived from the original on 23 October 2010. Retrieved 24 October 2010. 
  6. ^ "JMA Tropical Cyclone Advisory 241200 on Tropical Storm Chaba". Japan Meteorological Agency. Archived from the original on 24 October 2010. Retrieved 25 October 2010. 
  7. ^ "JTWC Tropical Storm Chaba Warning 13". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Archived from the original on 24 October 2010. Retrieved 25 October 2010. 
  8. ^ "JMA Tropical Cyclone Advisory 250600 on Severe Tropical Storm Chaba". Japan Meteorological Agency. Archived from the original on 25 October 2010. Retrieved 25 October 2010. 
  9. ^ "JTWC Typhoon 16W Warning 18". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Archived from the original on 25 October 2010. Retrieved 27 October 2010. 
  10. ^ "JMA Tropical Cyclone Advisory 260000 for Typhoon Chaba". Japan Meteorological Agency. Archived from the original on 26 October 2010. Retrieved 26 October 2010. 
  11. ^ "JTWC Typhoon 16W Warning 22". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Archived from the original on 27 October 2010. Retrieved 27 October 2010. 
  12. ^ "JTWC Typhoon 16W Warning 24". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Archived from the original on 27 October 2010. Retrieved 27 October 2010. 
  13. ^ "Typhoon 2000". Typhoon 2000. Retrieved 28 October 2010. 
  14. ^ "JTWC Typhoon Chaba Warning 29". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Archived from the original on 28 October 2010. Retrieved 28 October 2010. 
  15. ^ "JTWC Typhoon Chaba Warning 31". Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Archived from the original on 29 October 2010. Retrieved 29 October 2010. 
  16. ^ "Major Rain And Flooding Event". Cliff Mass weather blog. Retrieved 2 November 2010. 
  17. ^ "Update". Cliff Mass weather blog. Retrieved 2 November 2010. 
  18. ^ "Less Flooding Risks". Cliff Mass weather blog. Retrieved 2 November 2010. 
  19. ^ Kimball, Jill (1 November 2010). "Monday's rain set a record for Nov. 1". The Seattle Times. Retrieved 2 November 2010. 
  20. ^ "More than 160 flights cancelled as Typhoon Chaba heads for Okinawa". MediaCorp Press. Retrieved 29 October 2010. 
  21. ^ "Strong typhoon churns toward Japan". Agence France-Presse. Retrieved 29 October 2010. 
  22. ^ Ballion, Susan. "Japan issues weather warnings". InsideJapan Tours. Retrieved 29 October 2010. 
  23. ^ a b Staff Writer (29 October 2010). "Strong typhoon approaches rain-hit Amami region". The Mainichi Daily News. Archived from the original on 31 October 2010. Retrieved 31 October 2010. 
  24. ^ Staff Writer. "Strong typhoon heading toward disaster-struck Amami islands". THE MAINICHI NEWSPAPERS. Retrieved 29 October 2010. 
  25. ^ Hur, Jae (29 October 2010). "Chaba Weakens Over Japan, Downgraded to Tropical Storm as It Nears Tokyo". Bloomberg. Retrieved 30 October 2010. 
  26. ^ Speta, Robert (2 September 2014). "What is a Typhoon Name? PAGASA Censors "Kanor"". Western Pacific Weather. Retrieved 24 January 2015. 

External links[edit]