Tyra Calderwood

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Tyra Calderwood
TYRA CALDERWOOD (3244659233).jpg
Calderwood at the 2009 NSW Tennis Open
Country (sports)  Australia
Residence Sydney, Australia
Born (1990-09-19) 19 September 1990 (age 27)
Sydney, Australia
Turned pro 2007
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money US$45,268
Singles
Career record 67–102
Career titles 0 WTA, 0 ITF
Highest ranking No. 607 (6 October 2008)
Doubles
Career record 96–94
Career titles 0 WTA, 6 ITF
Highest ranking No. 190 (10 September 2012)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open 1R (2008, 2009, 2012)
Last updated on: 5 July 2013.

Tyra Calderwood (born 19 September 1990, in Sydney)[1] is a professional Australian tennis player. Her highest WTA singles ranking is 607, which she reached on 6 October 2008. Her career high in doubles was at 190 set at 10 September 2012.

Early life and junior career[edit]

Calderwood was born in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia and started playing tennis at the age of three.[1]

She has had limited success on the circuit, though her junior ranking did peak at 33 in 2007.

Career[edit]

In 2008, she made her WTA doubles debut after being given a wild card with Alenka Hubacek into the Australian Open. However, they lost first round in straight sets. in December of that year she won the Sorrento ITF doubles title with Shannon Golds.

In 2009, she received wildcards into the doubles tournaments at both the Medibank International and the Australian Open, losing first round in both tournaments.

As at 22 June 2009, She is ranked 637 in singles and 308 in doubles.

ITF Circuit finals[edit]

Doubles: 14 (6–8)[edit]

$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments
Finals by surface
Hard (6/6)
Clay (0/0)
Grass (0/2)
Carpet (0/0)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Winner 1. 5 December 2008 Sorrento, Australia Hard Australia Shannon Golds United Kingdom Jade Curtis
Hong Kong Zhang Ling
6–4, 3–6, [10–8]
Runner–up 2. 4 May 2009 Ipswich, Australia Grass Australia Shannon Golds Japan Maki Arai
Australia Olivia Rogowska
3–6, 2–6
Runner–up 3. 14 September 2009 Darwin, Australia Hard Australia Olivia Rogowska Australia Nicole Kriz
Australia Alicia Molik
3–6, 4–6
Runner-up 4. 11 September 2010 Cairns, Australia Hard Thailand Noppawan Lertcheewakarn Australia Tammi Patterson
Australia Olivia Rogowska
3–6, 6–7(3–7)
Runner–up 5. 19 September 2011 Darwin, Australia Hard Australia Stephanie Bengson Brazil Maria Fernanda Alves
United Kingdom Samantha Murray
4–6, 2–6
Winner 6. 31 October 2011 Mount Gambier, Australia Hard Australia Stephanie Bengson Australia Isabella Holland
Australia Sally Peers
W/O
Winner 7. 14 November 2011 Traralgon, Australia Hard Australia Stephanie Bengson Australia Monique Adamczak
Australia Bojana Bobusic
6–7(2–7), 6–1, 6–3
Winner 8. 21 November 2011 Bendigo, Australia Hard Australia Stephanie Bengson Australia Storm Sanders
United Kingdom Samantha Murray
2–6, 6–1, 6–3
Runner-up 9. 4 February 2012 Burnie, Australia Hard Australia Stephanie Bengson Australia Arina Rodionova
United Kingdom Melanie South
2–6, 2–6
Runner-up 10. 20 February 2012 Mildura, Australia Grass Australia Stephanie Bengson Bosnia and Herzegovina Mervana Jugić-Salkić
Russia Ksenia Lykina
7–5, 5–7, [7–10]
Winner 11. 25 June 2012 Pattaya, Thailand Hard New Zealand Dianne Hollands China Deng Mengning
China Zhao Qianqian
6–1, 6–3
Runner-up 12. 2 July 2012 Pattaya, Thailand Hard New Zealand Dianne Hollands Japan Eri Hozumi
Japan Mari Tanaka
6–4, 4–6, [10–12]
Runner–up 13. 27 Aug 2012 Cairns, Australia Hard Australia Tammi Patterson Australia Monique Adamczak
France Victoria Larriere
2–6, 6–1, [5–10]
Winner 14. 4 March 2013 Sydney, Australia Hard Australia Alison Bai Australia Anja Dokic
Australia Jessica Moore
7–6(7–3), 6–4

References[edit]

External links[edit]