Tyrone Downie

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Tyrone Downie
Tyrone Downie CroixRouge 09846.jpg
2016
Background information
Birth nameTyrone Downie
Also known asOrgan D
Born (1956-05-20) 20 May 1956 (age 63)
OriginKing Street, Kingston, Jamaica
GenresReggae
Occupation(s)Arranger, Pianist, Musician
InstrumentsKeyboards (piano, rhodes piano, organ, synthesizers, mellotron), guitar
Years active1970–present
Associated actsBob Marley & The Wailers, The Wailers Band, Tom Tom Club, Peter Tosh, Burning Spear, Steel Pulse, Sly & Robbie Has also toured Zambia and elsewhere with Jimmy Cliff.

Tyrone Downie is a Jamaican keyboardist/pianist who is most known for his involvement as a member of Bob Marley and The Wailers.[1] He studied at Kingston College and joined The Wailers in the mid-1970s, making his recording début with the band on Rastaman Vibration, having previously been a member of the Impact All Stars.[2][3] He has also played with The Abyssinians, Beenie Man, Black Uhuru,[3] Buju Banton, Peter Tosh, Junior Reid,[1] Tom Tom Club, Ian Dury, Burning Spear, Steel Pulse, Alpha Blondy, Tiken Jah Fakoly and Sly & Robbie. He currently resides in France and is a member of the touring band of Youssou N'Dour, whose album Remember he produced.[2]

In 1983, Grace Jones released the Single "My Jamaican Guy". Unbeknown to Downie, he (though in a relationship and not romantically linked to Jones) was the subject of the song.[4]

Downie released the solo album Organ-D in 2001.[3]


References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Foster, Chuck (1999) Roots Rock Reggae, Billboard Books, ISBN 0-8230-7831-0, p. 66, 116
  2. ^ a b "Wailers bands carry on tradition for survival", Jamaica Gleaner, 19 July 2009, retrieved 2010-10-31
  3. ^ a b c Moskowitz, David V. (2006) "Tyrone Downie", in Caribbean Popular Music: an Encyclopedia of Reggae, Mento, Ska, Rock Steady, and Dancehall, Greenwood Press, ISBN 0-313-33158-8, p. 92-3
  4. ^ Simon Hattenstone (17 April 2010). "Grace Jones: 'God I'm scary. I'm scaring myself'". The Guardian. www.guardian.co.uk. Retrieved 2 January 2012.

External links[edit]