United States District Court for the District of Columbia

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United States District Court for the District of Columbia
(D.D.C.)
DC locator map with state names w usmap.png
Location E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse
Appeals to District of Columbia Circuit
Established March 3, 1863
Judges assigned 15
Chief Judge Beryl A. Howell
Officers of the court
U.S. Attorney Jessie K. Liu
www.dcd.uscourts.gov

The United States District Court for the District of Columbia (in case citations, D.D.C.) is a federal district court. Appeals from the District are taken to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (except for patent claims and claims against the U.S. government under the Tucker Act, which are appealed to the Federal Circuit).

History[edit]

The court was established by Congress in 1863 as the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia, replacing the abolished circuit and district courts of the District of Columbia that had been in place since 1801. The court consisted of four justices, including a chief justice, and was granted the same powers and jurisdiction as the earlier circuit court. Any of the justices could convene a United States circuit court or a local criminal court. In 1936, Congress renamed the court the District Court for the District of Columbia. Its current name was adopted in 1948, and from then on justices were known as judges.

Originally housed in the former District of Columbia City Hall, the court now sits in the E. Barrett Prettyman Federal Courthouse located at 333 Constitution Avenue, Northwest, Washington, D.C. The District has no local district attorney or equivalent, and so local prosecutorial matters also fall into the jurisdiction of the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia. Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSAs) are tasked with prosecution of not only federal crimes but also crimes that would normally be left to the state prosecutor's discretion. Because of this the District has the largest U.S. Attorney's Office in the nation, with around 250 AUSAs.

Current judges[edit]

# Title Judge Duty station Born Term of service Appointed by
Active Chief Senior
96 Chief Judge Beryl A. Howell Washington, D.C. 1956 2010–present 2016–present Obama
85 District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan Washington, D.C. 1947 1994–present Clinton
88 District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly Washington, D.C. 1943 1997–present Clinton
98 District Judge James E. Boasberg Washington, D.C. 1963 2011–present Obama
99 District Judge Amy Berman Jackson Washington, D.C. 1954 2011–present Obama
100 District Judge Rudolph Contreras Washington, D.C. 1962 2012–present Obama
101 District Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson Washington, D.C. 1970 2013–present Obama
102 District Judge Christopher R. Cooper Washington, D.C. 1966 2014–present Obama
103 District Judge Tanya S. Chutkan Washington, D.C. 1962 2014–present Obama
104 District Judge Randolph Moss Washington, D.C. 1961 2014–present Obama
105 District Judge Amit P. Mehta Washington, D.C. 1971 2014–present Obama
106 District Judge Timothy J. Kelly Washington, D.C. 1969 2017–present Trump
107 District Judge Trevor N. McFadden Washington, D.C. 1978 2017–present Trump
108 District Judge Dabney L. Friedrich Washington, D.C. 1967 2017–present Trump
109 District Judge vacant Washington, D.C.
74 Senior Judge Joyce Hens Green inactive 1928 1979–1995 1995–present Carter
77 Senior Judge Thomas F. Hogan Washington, D.C. 1938 1982–2008 2001–2008 2008–present Reagan
81 Senior Judge Royce Lamberth San Antonio, Texas[Note 1] 1943 1987–2013 2008–2013 2013–present Reagan
83 Senior Judge Paul L. Friedman Washington, D.C. 1944 1994–2009 2009–present Clinton
84 Senior Judge Gladys Kessler inactive 1938 1994–2007 2007–present Clinton
89 Senior Judge Henry H. Kennedy Jr. inactive 1948 1997–2011 2011–present Clinton
90 Senior Judge Richard W. Roberts inactive 1953 1998–2016 2013–2016 2016–present Clinton
91 Senior Judge Ellen Segal Huvelle Washington, D.C. 1948 1999–2014 2014–present Clinton
92 Senior Judge Reggie Walton Washington, D.C. 1949 2001–2015 2015–present G.W. Bush
93 Senior Judge John D. Bates[1] Washington, D.C. 1946 2001–2014 2014–present G.W. Bush
94 Senior Judge Richard J. Leon Washington, D.C. 1949 2002–2016 2016–present G.W. Bush
95 Senior Judge Rosemary M. Collyer Washington, D.C. 1945 2002–2016 2016–present G.W. Bush
  1. ^ Lamberth moved his chambers to San Antonio in 2015.

Vacancies and pending nominations[edit]

Seat Seat last held by Vacancy reason Date of vacancy Nominee Date of nomination
3 Richard W. Roberts Senior Status March 16, 2016 Carl J. Nichols June 18, 2018

Former judges[edit]

# Judge State Born–died Active service Chief Judge Senior status Appointed by Reason for
termination
1 David Kellogg Cartter DC 1812–1887 1863–1887 1863–1887 Lincoln death
2 George P. Fisher DC 1817–1899 1863–1870 Lincoln resignation
3 Abram B. Olin DC 1808–1879 1863–1879 Lincoln retirement
4 Andrew Wylie DC 1814–1905 1863[2]–1885 Lincoln retirement
5 David Campbell Humphreys DC 1817–1879 1870–1879 Grant death
6 Arthur MacArthur Sr. DC 1815–1896 1870–1887 Grant retirement
7 Alexander Burton Hagner DC 1826–1915 1879–1903 Hayes retirement
8 Walter Smith Cox DC 1826–1902 1879–1899 Hayes retirement
9 Charles Pinckney James DC 1818–1899 1879[3]–1892 Hayes retirement
10 William Matthews Merrick DC 1818–1889 1885[4]–1889 Cleveland death
11 Martin V. Montgomery DC 1840–1898 1887[5]–1892 Cleveland resignation
12 Edward Franklin Bingham DC 1828–1907 1887[6]–1903 1887–1903 Cleveland retirement
13 Andrew Coyle Bradley DC 1844–1902 1889–1902 B. Harrison death
14 Louis E. McComas DC 1846–1907 1892[7]–1899 B. Harrison resignation
15 Charles Cleaves Cole DC 1841–1905 1893–1901 B. Harrison resignation
16 Harry M. Clabaugh DC 1856–1914 1899–1903 McKinley appointment as Chief Justice
16.1 Harry M. Clabaugh DC 1856–1914 1903[8]–1914 1903–1914 T. Roosevelt death
17 Job Barnard DC 1844–1923 1899[9]–1914 McKinley retirement
18 Thomas H. Anderson DC 1848–1916 1901[10]–1916 McKinley death
19 Ashley Mulgrave Gould DC 1859–1921 1902–1921 T. Roosevelt death
20 Jeter Connelly Pritchard DC 1857–1921 1903–1904 T. Roosevelt appointment to 4th Cir.
21 Daniel Thew Wright DC 1864–1943 1903–1914 T. Roosevelt resignation
22 Wendell Phillips Stafford DC 1861–1953 1904[11]–1931 T. Roosevelt retirement
23 J. Harry Covington DC 1870–1942 1914–1918 1914–1918 Wilson resignation
24 Walter I. McCoy DC 1859–1933 1914–1918 Wilson appointment as Chief Justice
24.1 Walter I. McCoy DC 1859–1933 1918–1929 1918–1929 Wilson retirement
25 Frederick Lincoln Siddons DC 1864–1931 1915–1931 Wilson death
26 William Hitz DC 1872–1935 1916[12]–1931 Wilson appointment to D.C. Cir.
27 Thomas Jennings Bailey DC 1867–1963 1918–1950 1950–1963 Wilson death
28 Adolph A. Hoehling Jr. DC 1868–1941 1921–1927 Harding resignation
29 Peyton Gordon DC 1870–1946 1928–1941 1941–1946 Coolidge death
30 Alfred Adams Wheat DC 1867–1943 1929–1930 Hoover appointment as Chief Justice
30.1 Alfred Adams Wheat DC 1867–1943 1930–1941 1930–1941 1941–1943 Hoover death
31 Jesse Corcoran Adkins DC 1879–1955 1930–1946 1946–1955 Hoover death
32 Oscar Raymond Luhring DC 1879–1944 1930–1944 Hoover death
33 Joseph Winston Cox DC 1875–1939 1930–1939 Hoover death
34 James McPherson Proctor DC 1882–1953 1931–1948 Hoover appointment to D.C. Cir.
35 F. Dickinson Letts DC 1875–1965 1931[13]–1961 1958–1959 1961–1965 Hoover death
36 Daniel William O'Donoghue DC 1876–1948 1931[14]–1946 1946–1948 Hoover death
37 Bolitha James Laws DC 1891–1958 1938–1945 F. Roosevelt appointment as Chief Justice
37.1 Bolitha James Laws DC 1891–1958 1945–1948 1945–1948 F. Roosevelt appointment as District Judge
37.2 Bolitha James Laws DC 1891–1958 1948–1958 1948–1958 operation of law death
38 Thomas Alan Goldsborough DC 1877–1951 1939–1951 F. Roosevelt death
39 James Ward Morris DC 1890–1960 1939–1960 F. Roosevelt death
40 David Andrew Pine DC 1891–1970 1940–1965 1959–1961 1965–1970 F. Roosevelt death
41 Matthew Francis McGuire DC 1898–1986 1941–1966 1961–1966 1966–1986 F. Roosevelt death
42 Edward C. Eicher DC 1878–1944 1942–1944 1942–1944 F. Roosevelt death
43 Henry Albert Schweinhaut DC 1902–1970 1944–1956 1956–1970 F. Roosevelt death
44 Alexander Holtzoff DC 1886–1969 1945–1967 1967–1969 Truman death
45 Richmond Bowling Keech DC 1896–1986 1946[15]–1966 1966–1966 1966–1986 Truman death
46 Edward Matthew Curran DC 1903–1988 1946[16]–1971 1966–1971 1971–1988 Truman death
47 Edward Allen Tamm DC 1906–1985 1948[17]–1965 Truman appointment to D.C. Cir.
48 James Robert Kirkland DC 1903–1958 1949[18]–1958 Truman death
49 Burnita Shelton Matthews DC 1894–1988 1949[19]–1968 1968–1988 Truman death
50 Charles F. McLaughlin DC 1887–1976 1949[20]–1964 1964–1976 Truman death
51 Walter Maximillian Bastian DC 1891–1975 1950[21]–1954 Truman appointment to D.C. Cir.
52 Luther Youngdahl DC 1896–1978 1951–1966 1966–1978 Truman death
53 Joseph Charles McGarraghy DC 1897–1975 1954–1967 1967–1975 Eisenhower death
54 John Sirica DC 1904–1992 1957–1977 1971–1974 1977–1992 Eisenhower death
55 George Luzerne Hart Jr. DC 1905–1984 1958[22]–1979 1974–1975 1979–1984 Eisenhower death
56 Leonard Patrick Walsh DC 1904–1980 1959–1971 1971–1980 Eisenhower death
57 William Blakely Jones DC 1907–1979 1962–1977 1975–1977 1977–1979 Kennedy death
58 Spottswood William Robinson III DC 1916–1998 1964[23]–1966 L. Johnson appointment to D.C. Cir.
59 Howard Francis Corcoran DC 1906–1989 1965–1977 1977–1989 L. Johnson death
60 William B. Bryant DC 1911–2005 1965–1982 1977–1981 1982–2005 L. Johnson death
61 Oliver Gasch DC 1906–1999 1965–1981 1981–1999 L. Johnson death
62 John Lewis Smith Jr. DC 1912–1992 1966–1983 1981–1982 1983–1992 L. Johnson death
63 Aubrey Eugene Robinson Jr. DC 1922–2000 1966–1992 1982–1992 1992–2000 L. Johnson death
64 Joseph Cornelius Waddy DC 1911–1978 1967–1978 L. Johnson death
65 Gerhard Gesell DC 1910–1993 1967–1993 1993–1993 L. Johnson death
66 June Lazenby Green DC 1914–2001 1968–1984 1984–2001 L. Johnson death
67 John H. Pratt DC 1910–1995 1968–1989 1989–1995 L. Johnson death
68 Barrington D. Parker DC 1915–1993 1969–1985 1985–1993 Nixon death
69 Charles Robert Richey DC 1923–1997 1971–1997 1997–1997 Nixon death
70 Thomas Aquinas Flannery DC 1918–2007 1971–1985 1985–2007 Nixon death
71 Louis F. Oberdorfer DC 1919–2013 1977–1992 1992–2013 Carter death
72 Harold H. Greene DC 1923–2000 1978–1995 1995–2000 Carter death
73 John Garrett Penn DC 1932–2007 1979–1998 1992–1997 1998–2007 Carter death
75 Norma Holloway Johnson DC 1932–2011 1980–2001 1997–2001 2001–2003 Carter retirement
76 Thomas Penfield Jackson DC 1937–2013 1982–2002 2002–2004 Reagan retirement
78 Stanley S. Harris DC 1927–present 1983–1996 1996–2001 Reagan retirement
79 George Hughes Revercomb DC 1929–1993 1985–1993 Reagan death
80 Stanley Sporkin DC 1932–present 1985–1999 1999–2000 Reagan retirement
82 Michael Boudin DC 1939–present 1990–1992 G.H.W. Bush resignation
86 Ricardo M. Urbina DC 1946–present 1994–2011 2011–2012 Clinton retirement
87 James Robertson DC 1938–present 1994–2008 2008–2010 Clinton retirement
97 Robert L. Wilkins DC 1963–present 2010–2014
Obama appointment to D.C. Cir.

Chief judges[edit]

Chief judges have administrative responsibilities with respect to their district court. Unlike the Supreme Court, where one justice is specifically nominated to be chief, the office of chief judge rotates among the district court judges. To be chief, a judge must have been in active service on the court for at least one year, be under the age of 65, and have not previously served as chief judge. A vacancy is filled by the judge highest in seniority among the group of qualified judges. The chief judge serves for a term of seven years or until age 70, whichever occurs first. The age restrictions are waived if no members of the court would otherwise be qualified for the position.

When the office was created in 1948, the chief judge was the longest-serving judge who had not elected to retire on what has since 1958 been known as senior status or declined to serve as chief judge. After August 6, 1959, judges could not become or remain chief after turning 70 years old. The current rules have been in operation since October 1, 1982.

Succession of seats[edit]

  • Associate Justices Clabaugh, McCoy, Wheat and Laws were elevated to Chief Justice.
  • Chief Justice Laws was assigned to the new Seat 13 by operation of law upon the abolition of the Chief Justice Seat 1.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Appointed Director of the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts on June 11, 2013, by Chief Justice of the Supreme Court John Roberts. He retains his commission as a United States District Court Judge. The appointment takes effect July 1, 2013. Kathleen Arberg (June 11, 2013). "Press Releases – 06/11/13 – Supreme Court of the United States". The Supreme Court of the United States. Retrieved June 11, 2013. 
  2. ^ Recess appointment; Wylie was formally nominated January 5, 1864 and was confirmed January 20, receiving his commission the same day.
  3. ^ Recess appointment; James was formally nominated on December 1, 1879, confirmed by the Senate December 10, 1879 and received his commission the same day.
  4. ^ Recess appointment; Merrick was formally nominated on December 14, 1885, confirmed by the Senate March 15, 1856 and received his commission the same day.
  5. ^ Recess appointment; Montgomery was formally nominated on December 20, 1887, confirmed by the Senate January 26, 1888 and received his commission the same day.
  6. ^ Recess appointment; Montgomery was formally nominated on December 20, 1887, confirmed by the Senate January 23, 1888 and received his commission the same day.
  7. ^ Recess appointment;McComas was formally nominated on December 6, 1892, confirmed by the Senate January 25, 1893 and received his commission the same day.
  8. ^ Recess appointment;Clabaugh was formally nominated on November 10, 1903, confirmed by the Senate November 16, 1903 and received his commission the same day.
  9. ^ Recess appointment; Barnard was formally nominated December 11, 1899, confirmed by the Senate December 19 and received his commission the same day
  10. ^ Recess appointment; Anderson was formally nominated December 5, 1901, confirmed by the Senate February 4, 1902 and received his commission February 6, 1902
  11. ^ Recess appointment; Stafford was formally nominated December 6, 1904, confirmed by the Senate December 13 and received his commission the same day
  12. ^ Recess appointment; Hitz was formally nominated December 15, 1916, confirmed by the Senate January 2, 1917 and received his commission the same day.
  13. ^ Recess appointment; Letts was formally nominated December 15, 1931, confirmed by the Senate February 17, 1932 and received his commission February 20, 1932.
  14. ^ Recess appointment; O'Donoghue was formally nominated December 15, 1931, confirmed by the Senate January 26, 1932 and received his commission February 23, 1932.
  15. ^ Recess appointment; Keech was formally nominated January 8, 1947, confirmed by the Senate January 22 and received his commission January 24.
  16. ^ Recess appointment; Curran was formally nominated January 8, 1947, confirmed by the Senate February 3 and received his commission February 5.
  17. ^ Recess appointment; Tamm was formally nominated January 13, 1949, confirmed by the Senate March 29 and received his commission April 1.
  18. ^ Recess appointment; Kirkland was formally nominated January 5, 1950, confirmed by the Senate March 8 and received his commission March 9.
  19. ^ Recess appointment; Matthews was formally nominated January 5, 1950, confirmed by the Senate April 4, 1950 and received his commission April 7, 1950.
  20. ^ Recess appointment; McLaughlin was formally nominated January 5, 1950, confirmed by the Senate February 27, 1950 and received his commission March 1, 1950.
  21. ^ Recess appointment; Bastian was formally nominated November 27, 1950, confirmed by the Senate December 14, 1950 and received his commission December 22, 1950.
  22. ^ Recess appointment; Hart was formally nominated January 17, 1959, confirmed by the Senate September 9 and received his commission September 10.
  23. ^ Recess appointment; Robinson was formally nominated February 3, 1964 confirmed by the Senate July 1, 1964 and received his commission July 2, 1964.

External links[edit]