U.S. Route 11 in Georgia

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This article is about the section of U.S. Route 11 in Georgia. For the entire route, see U.S. Route 11.
This article is about the current U.S. Highway. For the current state highway, see Georgia State Route 11.

U.S. Highway 11 marker

U.S. Highway 11
Route information
Maintained by GDOT
Length: 22.8 mi[1] (36.7 km)
Major junctions
South end: US 11 / SR 7 at the Alabama state line near Rising Fawn
 
North end: US 11 / SR 38 at the Tennessee state line in Chattanooga, TN
Location
Counties: Dade
Highway system
  • Georgia State Routes
SR 10 SR 12
SR 57 SR 58 I‑59

U.S. Route 11 (US 11) in the U.S. state of Georgia is a 22.8-mile-long (36.7 km) U.S. Highway the travels south-to-north through portions of Dade County in the northwestern part of the state. It is concurrent with State Route 58 (SR 58) for its entire length. In Georgia, the highway begins at US 11/SR 7 at the Alabama state line. It travels to its northern terminus at US 11/SR 38 at the Tennessee state line in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Route description[edit]

US 11 in the state of Georgia begins at the Alabama state line south-southwest of Rising Fawn. Here, US 11 continues into Alabama, where it is internally designated as SR 7. It travels to the north-north east. Almost immediately, it crosses over Red River Branch. It curves to the northeast and begins to parallel Interstate 59 (I-59). It curves back to the north-northeast and crosses over a tributary of Lookout Creek. It passes Hanna Cemetery and then travels through Rising Fawn. While there, it curves to the north-northwest and begins to parallel some railroad tracks of Norfolk Southern Railway for a short distance. It crosses over Allison Creek. It curves to the northeast and crosses over Crawfish Creek. The highway curves to the north-northeast and passes the Southeast Lineman Training Center just before passing the Dade County Sports Complex. It then enters Trenton. It has a brief concurrency with SR 136. Here, it begins to parallel some railroad tracks of Norfolk Southern Railway. Then, it crosses over Town Creek. In the main part of the city, the southbound and northbound lanes go around the Dade County Courthouse. It passes Trenton Cemetery and then Primary Health Care Center – Lookout Mountain. Just after crossing over McClain Branch, it leaves Trenton. It travels through New England. Just before crossing over Squirrel Town Creek, it separates from I-59 and curve to the northeast. After curving to the east-northeast, it crosses over Pope Creek. After traveling just north of Wildwood, it crosses over the Wauhatchie Creek. After intersecting the southern terminus of SR 299, the highway travels under a railroad bridge that carries railroad tracks of CSX. It then reaches the Tennessee state line, where SR 58 ends. US 11 continues into Tennessee, where it is internally designated as SR 38.

History[edit]

The roadway that would eventually become US 11 in Georgia was established by at least 1920 as part of SR 1 from Trenton to the Tennessee state line. This was just a dirt path.[2] By the third quarter of 1921, the roadway had been redesignated as SR 58 and extended to the Alabama state line.[2][3] By the end of 1926, a segment near Rising Fawn and a segment near Wildwood had a "completed hard surface". Also, a segment from about Rising Fawn to Trenton had a "sand clay or top soil" surface.[3][4] By the end of 1929, the entire highway had been designated as part of US 11.[4][5] By the middle of 1930, the entire highway had a "completed hard surface".[5][6]

By 1940, SR 2 was built in the Trenton area. It connected Trenton to areas to its southeast.[7][8] By the end of 1946, SR 2 had been extended to the Alabama state line, thus having a concurrency with US 11/SR 58.[9][10] By the end of the decade, all of SR 2 in the Trenton area had been redesignated as SR 143.[11][12] By 1953, a roadway had been built to connect US 11/SR 58 with the areas west of Chattanooga. This intersection was placed near Wildwood.[13][14] By the middle of 1955, this roadway had been designated as SR 299.[15][16]

By 1979, SR 143 had been redesignated as SR 136.[17][18]

Major intersections[edit]

The entire route is in Dade County.

Location mi[1] km Destinations Notes
0.00 0.00 US 11 south (SR 7) – Fort Payne Continuation into Alabama
SR 58 begins Southern terminus of SR 58; southern end of SR 58 concurrency
Trenton 12.0 19.3 SR 136 east (Lafayette Street) – LaFayette Southern end of SR 136 concurrency
12.2 19.6 SR 136 west (White Oak Gap Road) to I‑59 – Chattanooga, Scottsboro Northern end of SR 136 concurrency
22.0 35.4 SR 299 north to I‑24 – Jasper Southern terminus of SR 299
22.75 36.61 SR 58 ends Northern terminus of SR 58; northern end of SR 58 concurrency
US 11 north (SR 38 / Birmingham Highway) – Chattanooga Continuation into Tennessee
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Google (December 28, 2016). "Overview map of US 11 in Georgia" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved December 28, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1920). System of State Aid Roads as Approved Representing 4800 Miles of State Aid Roads Outside the Limits of the Incorporated Towns (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved December 29, 2016. 
  3. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1921). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved December 29, 2016. 
  4. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1926). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved December 29, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b No year defined.
  6. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (June 1930). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved December 29, 2016. 
  7. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1939). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved December 29, 2016. 
  8. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1940). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved December 29, 2016. 
  9. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1945). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved December 29, 2016. 
  10. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1946). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved December 29, 2016.  (Corrected to November 7, 1946.)
  11. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1948). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved December 29, 2016.  (Corrected to February 28, 1948.)
  12. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1949). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved December 29, 2016.  (Corrected to April 1, 1949.)
  13. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1952). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved December 29, 2016.  (Corrected to January 1, 1952.)
  14. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1953). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved December 29, 2016.  (Corrected to September 1, 1953.)
  15. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1954). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved December 29, 2016.  (Corrected to June 1, 1954.)
  16. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1955). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved December 29, 2016.  (Corrected to June 1, 1955.)
  17. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1977). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1977–78 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 29, 2016. 
  18. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1978). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1978-79 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 29, 2016. 

External links[edit]

KML is not from Wikidata


U.S. Route 11
Previous state:
Alabama
Georgia Next state:
Tennessee