U.S. State Fuel Octane Standards

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Most states do not mandate certain standard gasoline grade octane ratings. In the United States and Canada, octane ratings are in AKI, commonly shown as "(R+M)/2". All states require gas pump to be labeled with the correct octane level and nearly all states do regular testing to make sure gas stations are in compliance. A minimum 87 octane fuel is recommend for most vehicles produced since 1984. Older cars with carburetors could operate with lower octane fuel at higher elevations. Regardless of legality fuel with an octane rating of less than 87 is generally not offered for sale in most states. However 85 and 86 octane gasoline can still commonly be found in several rocky mountain states.

State Octane Ratings[edit]

The octane ratings below are the lowest allowed by law and may or may not reflect the actual levels offered for sale at most gas stations. Ethanol's effect on octane is not considered--these are ratings that are seen at the pump.

State Regular Unleaded Mid-Grade Unleaded Premium Unleaded Notes
Alabama
Alaska 90
Arizona 87 89 91
Arkansas
California 87 89 91
Colorado
Connecticut 87 89 91 86 octane may be sold if labeled as economy[1]
Delaware
Florida 87[2] 89 91
Georgia 87 [3] 89 93 [4]
Hawaii 87 89 92
Idaho
Illinois 87 [5] 89 91
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky 86[6] 89 91
Louisiana
Maine 87 89 91 93 (exclusively available where Shell V-Power Premium unleaded gas is sold)
Maryland
Massachusetts 87 89 93
Michigan 87 88 90 85 and 86 octane may be sold if labeled as subregular[7]
Minnesota <88 [8] 88 91
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana 85.5[9]
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey New Jersey checks for fraudulent labeling of octane ratings.[10]
New Mexico
New York 87[11]
North Carolina
North Dakota 87 [12] 89 91
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania 87 89 93
Rhode Island 87 89 93
South Carolina 87 N/A 91 lower octane gas can be sold if labeled as "sub-standard" or "sub-regular"[13]
South Dakota 87 89 91 85 or 86 octane can be sold as "sub-regular" with a warning[14] label displayed at the pump and is found in western parts of the state[15]
Tennessee
Texas 87 89 93
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington 87 89 92
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.ct.gov/dcp/lib/dcp/pdf/laws_and_regulations/motor_fuel_quality_regs_current_12042008_(2).pdf
  2. ^ Florida Administrative Code 5F-2
  3. ^ http://agr.georgia.gov/1fuel-measures-faqs.aspx
  4. ^ http://agr.georgia.gov/1fuel-measures-faqs.aspx
  5. ^ http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ActID=2339
  6. ^ http://www.lrc.state.ky.us/kar/302/079/010.htm
  7. ^ https://www.legislature.mi.gov/(S(kvnx05fhsdtufphvy1a1ste3))/documents/mcl/pdf/mcl-Act-44-of-1984.pdf
  8. ^ https://www.revisor.leg.state.mn.us/statutes/?id=239.752
  9. ^ http://bsd.dli.mt.gov/weights-and-measures/faq
  10. ^ "New Jersey Weights and Measures" (PDF). NJ Department of Law and Public Safety. Retrieved 7 September 2017.
  11. ^ http://law.justia.com/codes/new-york/2012/agm/article-16/192-a
  12. ^ http://www.legis.nd.gov/information/acdata/pdf/33-34-01.pdf
  13. ^ http://www.scstatehouse.gov/code/t39c041.php
  14. ^ http://rapidcityjournal.com/news/local/octane-warning-labels-not-posted-at-many-gas-stations/article_681e07bc-3cd3-5e0c-a3c7-c06fcc4d319c.html
  15. ^ https://dps.sd.gov/documents/OctaneEmerRule6Allow_000.pdf