UEFA Women's Championship

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UEFA Women's Championship
UEFA Women's Championship logo.svg
Founded1982; 40 years ago (1982)
RegionEurope (UEFA)
Number of teams16 (finals)
52 (qualifiers)
Current champions Netherlands (1st title)
Most successful team(s) Germany (8 titles)
WebsiteOfficial website
UEFA Women's Euro 2022
UEFA Women's Euro 2009 final (ceremony before the match).jpg
The closing ceremony prior to the 2009 final
Tournaments

The UEFA European Women's Championship, also called the UEFA Women's Euro, held every four years, is the main competition in women's association football between national teams of the UEFA confederation. The competition is the women's equivalent of the UEFA European Championship.

History[edit]

Women's football history has several turns and twists starting all the way in Europe.[1] The FICF, eventually merged into the Italian Football Federation, organised[2] a women's European tournament for national teams in Italy in 1969,[2] and a second was held unofficially in 1979[3] – tournaments won by Italy and Denmark respectively. There was the first UEFA-run international tournament in 1982 when the 1984 European Competition for Women's Football qualification was launched. The 1984 Finals were won by Sweden. Norway won in the 1987 Finals. Since then, the UEFA Women's Championship has been dominated by Germany, which has won eight out of ten events. Norway won in 1993 and the Netherlands in 2017. Germany's 2013 win had been their sixth in a row.

The tournament was initially played as a four-team event. The 1997 edition was the first that was played with eight teams. The third expansion happened in 2009 when 12 teams participated. From 2017 onwards 16 teams compete for the championship.[4]

The predecessor tournament to the UEFA Women's Championship in the early 1980s had the name "UEFA European Competition for Representative Women's Teams". With the increasing popularity of women's football, this competition was given European Championship status by UEFA around 1990.[clarification needed] Only the 1991 and 1995 editions have been used as European qualifiers for a FIFA Women's World Cup; starting in 1999, women's national teams adopted the separate World Cup qualifying competition and group system used in men's qualifiers.

Eight UEFA Women's Championships have taken place, preceded by three editions of the earlier "European Competition for Representative Women's Teams". The most recent holding of the competition is the 2017 Women's Euro hosted by the Netherlands in July and August 2017.

Results[edit]

Editions Years Hosts Finals Third place playoff or losing semi-finalists Number of teams
Winners Scores Runners-up Third place Score Fourth place
1 1984 Various
Sweden
1–0
0–1
(4–3 p)

England
 Denmark and  Italy 4
2 1987  Norway
Norway
2–1
Sweden

Italy
2–1
England
4
3 1989  West Germany
West Germany
4–1
Norway

Sweden
2–1 (a.e.t.)
Italy
4
4 1991  Denmark
Germany
3–1 (a.e.t.)
Norway

Denmark
2–1 (a.e.t.)
Italy
4
5 1993  Italy
Norway
1–0
Italy

Denmark
3–1
Germany
4
6 1995 Various
Germany
3–2
Sweden
 England and  Norway 4
7 1997  Norway
 Sweden

Germany
2–0
Italy
 Spain and  Sweden 8
8 2001  Germany
Germany
1–0 (g.g.)
Sweden
 Denmark and  Norway 8
9 2005  England
Germany
3–1
Norway
 Finland and  Sweden 8
10 2009  Finland
Germany
6–2
England
 Netherlands and  Norway 12
11 2013  Sweden
Germany
1–0
Norway
 Denmark and  Sweden 12
12 2017  Netherlands
Netherlands
4–2
Denmark
 Austria and  England 16
13 2022  England 16

Debut of teams[edit]

Ceremony before the UEFA Women's Euro 2009 final (Germany vs. England) at the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Helsinki, Finland
Players fighting for the ball during the match between Germany and Norway in UEFA Euro 2009 Women's European Championship in Tampere, Finland.
Reception of Germany women's national football team, after winning the 2009 UEFA Women's Championship, on the balcony of Frankfurt's city hall "Römer"
Year Debuting teams Successor teams
Teams No. CT
1984  Denmark,  England,  Italy,  Sweden 4 4
1987  Norway 1 5
1989  West Germany 1 6
1991 0 6  Germany
1993 0 6
1995 0 6
1997  France,  Russia,  Spain 3 9
2001 0 9
2005  Finland 1 10
2009  Iceland,  Netherlands,  Ukraine 3 13
2013 0 13
2017  Austria,  Belgium,  Portugal,  Scotland,   Switzerland 5 18
2022  Northern Ireland 1 19

Overall team records[edit]

In this ranking 2 points are awarded for a win, 1 for a draw and 0 for a loss. As per statistical convention in football, matches decided in extra time are counted as wins and losses, while matches decided by penalty shoot-outs are counted as draws. Teams are ranked by total points, then by goal difference, then by goals scored.[5]

As of UEFA Women's Euro 2017
Rank Team Part Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1  Germany 10 48 37 8 3 109 26 +83 82
2  Norway 11 44 23 7 14 69 53 16 53
3  Sweden 10 45 21 9 15 75 49 +26 51
4  Denmark 9 38 12 11 15 40 52 −12 35
5  Italy 11 40 12 8 20 50 67 −17 32
6  England 8 34 13 3 18 47 65 −18 29
7  France 6 23 8 7 8 30 33 −3 23
8  Netherlands 3 20 8 3 9 20 22 −2 19
9  Spain 3 12 3 3 6 10 14 −4 9
10  Finland 3 11 3 3 5 11 19 −8 9
11  Austria 1 5 2 3 0 5 1 +4 7
12  Russia[a] 5 19 1 4 14 10 43 −33 6
13   Switzerland 1 3 1 1 1 3 3 0 3
14  Iceland 3 12 1 1 10 6 23 −17 3
15  Belgium 1 3 1 0 2 3 3 0 2
16  Portugal 1 3 1 0 2 3 5 −2 2
17  Ukraine 1 3 1 0 2 2 4 −2 2
18  Scotland 1 3 1 0 2 2 8 −6 2
19  Hungary 1 2 0 0 2 1 4 −3 0

Comprehensive team results by tournament[edit]

Legend

  • 1st – Champions
  • 2nd – Runners-up
  • 3rd – Third place (not determined after 1993)
  • 4th – Fourth place (not determined after 1993)
  • SF – Semi-finals (since 1995)
  • QF – Quarter-finals (since 2009)
  • GS – Group stage
  • Q – Qualified for upcoming tournament
  •  •  – Did not qualify
  •  ×  – Did not enter / Withdrew / Banned
  •    – Hosts

For each tournament, the number of teams in each finals tournament (in brackets) are shown.

Team 1984
(4)
1987
Norway
(4)
1989
West Germany
(4)
1991
Denmark
(4)
1993
Italy
(4)
1995
(4)
1997
Norway
Sweden
(8)
2001
Germany
(8)
2005
England
(8)
2009
Finland
(12)
2013
Sweden
(12)
2017
Netherlands
(16)
2022
England
(16)
Total
 Austria × × × × × × SF Q 2
 Belgium GS Q 2
 Denmark SF 3rd 3rd GS SF GS GS SF 2nd Q 10
 England 2nd 4th SF GS GS 2nd GS SF Q 9
 Finland SF QF GS Q 4
 France GS GS GS QF QF QF Q 7
 Germany 1st 1st 4th 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st QF Q 11
 Iceland × × × GS QF GS Q 4
 Italy SF 3rd 4th 4th 2nd 2nd GS GS QF QF GS Q 12
 Netherlands SF GS 1st Q 4
 Northern Ireland × × × × × × Q 1
 Norway 1st 2nd 2nd 1st SF GS SF 2nd SF 2nd GS Q 12
 Portugal GS Q 2
 Russia × × × × GS GS GS GS GS × 5
 Scotland × GS 1
 Spain × SF QF QF Q 4
 Sweden 1st 2nd 3rd 2nd SF 2nd SF QF SF QF Q 11
  Switzerland GS Q 2
 Ukraine Part of  Soviet Union × GS 1

Medal table[edit]

Only in the 1987, 1989, 1991 and 1993 tournament there was a third place playoff. Losing semi-finalists are counted under bronze since 1995.

RankTeamGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1 Germany8008
2 Norway2439
3 Sweden1348
4 Netherlands1012
5 England0224
 Italy0224
7 Denmark0156
8 Austria0011
 Finland0011
 Spain0011
Totals (10 teams)12122044

Tournament statistics[edit]

Highest attendances[edit]

All-time top scorers[edit]

Rank Name Euro Total
1984 Norway
1987
West Germany
1989
Denmark
1991
Italy
1993
1995 Norway
Sweden
1997
Germany
2001
England
2005
Finland
2009
Sweden
2013
Netherlands
2017
1 Germany Inka Grings 4 6 10
Germany Birgit Prinz 2 2 1 3 2 10
3 Italy Carolina Morace 2 1 0 0 1 4 8
Germany Heidi Mohr 1 4 1 2 8
Sweden Lotta Schelin 0 1 5 2 8
6 Sweden Hanna Ljungberg 1 2 3 6
7 Italy Melania Gabbiadini 2 1 2 0 5
Norway Solveig Gulbrandsen 0 3 0 2 5
Germany Maren Meinert 1 1 1 2 5
Italy Patrizia Panico 1 2 0 2 0 5
Sweden Pia Sundhage 4 0 1 0 5
England Jodie Taylor 5 5
Sweden Lena Videkull 0 1 1 3 5
Germany Bettina Wiegmann 0 0 2 1 2 5

Top scorers by tournament[edit]

Year Player Maximum
matches
Goals
1984 Sweden Pia Sundhage 4 4
1987 Norway Trude Stendal 2 3
1989 Norway Sissel Grude
West Germany Ursula Lohn
2 2
1991 Germany Heidi Mohr 2 4
1993 Denmark Susan Mackensie 2 2
1995 Sweden Lena Videkull 3 3
1997 Italy Carolina Morace
Norway Marianne Pettersen
France Angélique Roujas
5 4
2001 Germany Claudia Müller
Germany Sandra Smisek
5 3
2005 Germany Inka Grings 5 4
2009 Germany Inka Grings 6 6
2013 Sweden Lotta Schelin 6 5
2017 England Jodie Taylor 6 5

UEFA.com Golden Player by tournament[edit]

Year Player
1984 Sweden Pia Sundhage
1987 Norway Heidi Støre
1989 West Germany Doris Fitschen
1991 Germany Silvia Neid
1993 Norway Hege Riise
1995 Germany Birgit Prinz
1997 Italy Carolina Morace
2001 Sweden Hanna Ljungberg
2005 Finland Anne Mäkinen
2009 Germany Inka Grings
2013 Germany Nadine Angerer1
2017 Netherlands Lieke Martens1

1Official player of the tournament since 2013.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Includes participations as  Soviet Union from 1954–1990; see below.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "History of Soccer - Women in Soccer".
  2. ^ a b "Coppa Europa per Nazioni (Women) 1969". Rsssf.com. 19 March 2001. Retrieved 12 September 2009.
  3. ^ "Inofficial European Women Championship 1979". Rsssf.com. 15 October 2000. Retrieved 12 September 2009.
  4. ^ "Women's EURO and U17s expanded". UEFA. 8 December 2011. Retrieved 8 December 2011.
  5. ^ "Women EURO » All-time league table". worldfootball.net. Retrieved 10 September 2021.

External links[edit]