United Kingdom constitutional law

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The Magna Carta 1215 required the King to hold political talks, in what became the Houses of Parliament.[1] The House of Lords remains unelected but can be overruled.[2] The House of Commons represent around 65 million people in 650 UK constituencies.

United Kingdom constitutional law concerns the basic structure of political governance in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

History[edit]

Principles[edit]

  • Sources of the Constitution: statutes, cases, conventions

Parliamentary sovereignty[edit]

Rule of law[edit]

Democracy[edit]

Localism[edit]

Internationalism[edit]

Institutions[edit]

Parliament[edit]

Judiciary[edit]

Executive[edit]

Public services[edit]


Human rights[edit]

Liberty[edit]

Privacy[edit]

Expression[edit]

Association[edit]

Social security[edit]

Administrative law[edit]

Administrative rules[edit]

Judicial review substance[edit]

Judicial review procedure[edit]

Public body liability[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Painted here by Claude Monet in 1904, in French, parler means "to talk", and the old French developed into the English word "Parliament".
  2. ^ Parliament Act 1911 and Parliament Act 1949

References[edit]