USC Trojans women's basketball

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USC Trojans Women's Basketball
2018–19 USC Trojans women's basketball team
USC Trojans logo.svg
UniversityUniversity of Southern California
All-time record760–481
Head coachMark Trakh (6th* season)
ConferencePac-12
LocationLos Angeles, California
ArenaGalen Center
(Capacity: 10,258)
NicknameTrojans
ColorsCardinal and Gold[1]
         
Uniforms
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Home jersey
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Team colours
Home
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Away jersey
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Team colours
Away
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Alternate jersey
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Team colours
Alternate
NCAA Tournament Champions
1983, 1984
NCAA Tournament Final Four
1983, 1984, 1986
NCAA Tournament Elite Eight
1982, 1983, 1984, 1986, 1992, 1994
NCAA Tournament Sweet Sixteen
1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1992, 1993, 1994
NCAA Tournament Appearances
1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997, 2005, 2006, 2014
AIAW Tournament Final Four
1981
AIAW Tournament Appearances
1980, 1981
Conference Tournament Champions
2014
Conference Regular Season Champions
1983, 1984, 1986, 1987, 1994

The USC Trojans Women's Basketball team, or the Women of Troy, is the collegiate women's basketball team that represents the University of Southern California, in the Pac-12 Conference. The team rose to prominence in 1976, at which time scholarships became available to female basketball players. They were the first Division I team to give these scholarships.

History[edit]

The Women of Troy made their first appearance in the Final Four in the 1981 AIAW Tournament. Following the successful 1982 season, in which USC reached the Elite Eight of the first NCAA Tournament, the Trojans went on to win national championships in 1983 and 1984. The 1983 championship team included three All-Americans, Paula McGee, Cheryl Miller, and Rhonda Windham. The 1983 team went 31–2 in the regular and post-season combined. The 1983 team bested their opponent, Louisiana Tech, by a mere 2 points. The final score was 69–67. The 1984 championship team went 29–4 in the regular and post season. The 1984 team faced University of Tennessee. The victory this year came by a healthy eleven points. The final score was 72–61. USC made the National Championship again in 1986 but did not prevail. They lost to University of Texas 97–81. They since have yet to appear in the National Championship.

In 1987 and 1994 the Trojans won the Pac-10 Championship. The Trojans had begun their longest playoff drought in 1998, which was broken when the team made it to the playoff bracket in 2005. Not until 2011 did the Trojans make it to the postseason again. In 2006 USC opened the Galen Center, which was the new home of the Women of Troy. It can seat over 10,000 fans, and it was sold out in 2007 for a game between the Trojans and the UCLA Bruins. It was the first time in history that an NCAA women's basketball game was sold out. Every year since 1986, at least one member of the Trojans team has been honored in the Pac-10 awards. To date, eleven players who played for USC have won Olympic medals.[2]

Notable players[edit]

  • Michelle Campbell, played 1993–1997, then played for the Washington Mystics of the WNBA in 2000.[3]
  • Cynthia Cooper, played 1982–1986. Cooper helped lead the team to its only National Championships (1983, 1984) and in 1988 won an Olympic gold medal with the U.S. national basketball team in Seoul. She also played with the Houston Comets in the WNBA, where the team won titles in 1997, 1998, 1999, and 2000. Signed as head coach at Prairie View A&M University in 2005, then UNC Wilmington in 2010, followed by Texas Southern in 2012.[4] She became the USC head coach for the 2013–14 season.[5]
  • Lisa Leslie, played 1990–1994. She set many records in points and rebounds, and in 1994, she was National Player of the Year. She got a contract with the WNBA in 1997, becoming one of the new league's first players, where she joined the Los Angeles Sparks. In 2001, she was the first WNBA player to win the regular season MVP, the All-Star Game MVP and the playoff MVP in the same season. Lisa also led the Los Angeles Sparks to two back-to-back WNBA Championships (2001, 2002). Lisa won 4 Olympic Gold medals and was the first woman in the WNBA to make a slam-dunk during an official game. In 2009 she retired and is now a team owner of the Los Angeles Sparks.[6][7]
  • Tina Thompson, played 1993–1997. Thompson led USC to the NCAA tournament 3 times (1994, 1995, 1997) and to one Elite 8 (1994). In 1994 she was named Freshmen of the Year in the Pac-10 Conference and Freshmen All-America by Basketball Times. In 1997 she was the first overall draft pick in the WNBA by the Houston Comets, she became the first draftee in the history of the WNBA. She helped lead the Comets to 4 WNBA Championships in 1997, 1998, 1999 and 2000.[8] Thompson played for Houston Comets from 1997–2008, the Los Angeles Sparks from 2009–2011, and the Seattle Storm from 2012–2013.[9]
  • Cheryl Miller, played 1982–1986. She led the Women of Troy to two National Championships (1983, 1984) and won the NCAA tournament MVP both years. She also coached for the Women of Troy for 2 seasons (1993–1995). In her 2 seasons she had a combined 44–14 record and went to the NCAA tournament both seasons, making a Regional Final once. She then went on to coach in the WNBA for the Phoenix Mercury (1997–2000). She was inducted to the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in 1999.[10][11]
  • Nicky McCrimmon, played 1992–1994, then for the Los Angeles Sparks in 2000,and Houston Comets in 2005.[3]
  • Adrian Williams, played 1995–1999, then for the Minnesota Lynx 2006–2007.[3]

Head Coaches[edit]

  • Linda Sharp (1977–1989) led The Women of Troy to 2 NCAA National Women Championships, 3 final four appearances. She ended her record with the Women of Troy with a 271–99 and was inducted into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in 2001.
  • Marianne Stanley (1989–1993) Led The Women of Troy to the NCAA Tournament 3 years in a row and recruited future WNBA Stars Lisa Leslie, Tina Thompson and Nicky McCrimmon. She has been inducted into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in 2002.
  • Cheryl Miller (1993–1995) coached only 2 seasons for the Women of Troy. In her 2 seasons she had a combined 44–14 record and went to the NCAA tournament both seasons, making a Regional Final once. Cheryl Miller is also a former player of the Women of Troy where she led the Women of Troy to two National Championships (1983, 1984) and won the NCAA tournament MVP both years. She then went on to coach in the WNBA for the Phoenix Mercury (1997–2000). She was inducted to the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in 1999.[10]
  • Fred Willams (1995–1997)
  • Chris Gobrecht (1997–2004)
  • Mark Trakh (2004–2009)[12] (2017–present)[13]
  • Michael Cooper (2009–2013) resigned as head coach for the Women of Troy. Of his 4-season he ended with a record of 61–37 (.622). As the head coach in 2009–10 season, he gave USC's best free-throw percentage (.725), the fewest turnovers (462) and fewest fouls (484) committed in Trojan history.[14]
  • Cynthia Cooper-Dyke (2013–2017) a former Women of Troy player, who helped lead the team to its only National Championships (1983, 1984) and in 1988 won an Olympic gold medal with the U.S. national basketball team in Seoul. She also played with the Houston Comets in the WNBA, where she led the team to a record four consecutive WNBA championships (1997–2000). She took the head coaching job for the USC Women of Troy for the 2013–2014 season and remained until 2017.[5][15]

Arenas[edit]

2017-2018 Roster[edit]

2017–18 USC Trojans women's basketball team
Players Coaches
Pos. # Name Height Year Previous school Hometown
G 0 Shalexxus Aaron Injured 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) Fr Martin Luther King HS Apple Valley, CA
G 1 Jordan Adams 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) GS Mater Dei HS Irvine, CA
G 3 Minyon Moore 5 ft 8 in (1.73 m) So Salesian HS Rodeo, CA
G 4 Mariya Moore (I) Current redshirt 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m) Sr Louisville Hercules, California
F 5 Ja'Tavia Tapley 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) So University Christian Jacksonville, FL
F 13 Marguerite Effa 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) Jr Fairfax Los Angeles, CA
G 14 Sadie Edwards 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m) Sr Blair Academy
Connecticut
Meriden, CT
G 21 Aliyah Mazyck 5 ft 9 in (1.75 m) Jr Myers Park HS Charlotte, NC
G 22 Kyerstin Galloway (W) 5 ft 5 in (1.65 m) Fr San Pedro HS Los Angeles, CA
F 23 Asiah Jones Injured 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) So Woodmont HS Piedmont, SC
G 30 Candela Abejón 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) Jr Univ. de Ovideo Asturias, Spain
F 32 Dani Milisic 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) RS So Blacktown Girls HS Sydney, Australia
F 35 Kristen Simon 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) Sr Windward School Gardena, CA
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)

Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • (S) Suspended
  • (I) Ineligible
  • (W) Walk-on

Roster
Last update: February 25, 2018

Year by year results[edit]

Conference tournament winners noted with #[18]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason Coaches' poll AP poll
Marci Cantrell (Independent, WCAA, Pac-8) (1976–1977)
1976–77 Marci Cantrell 5–16 1–7 4th (WCAA)
Marci Cantrell: 5–16 1–7
Linda Sharp (Independent, WCAA, Pac-10) (1977–1989)
1977–78 Linda Sharp 11–13 3–5 4th (WCAA)
1978–79 Linda Sharp 21–10 4–4 3rd WAIAW
1979–80 Linda Sharp 22–12 9–3 3rd AIAW First Round
1980–81 Linda Sharp 26–8 9–3 1st AIAW Fourth Place 4
1981–82 Linda Sharp 23–4 9–3 2nd NCAA Elite Eight 6
1982–83 Linda Sharp 31–2 13–1 1st NCAA Champions 1
1983–84 Linda Sharp 29–4 13–1 1st NCAA Champions 5
1984–85 Linda Sharp 21–9 10–4 2nd NCAA Sweet Sixteen 15
1985–86 Linda Sharp 31–5 8–0 1st NCAA Runner-up 2 3
Pac-12 Conference
1986–87 Linda Sharp 22–8 15–3 1st (Pac-12) NCAA Sweet Sixteen 14 19
1987–88 Linda Sharp 22–8 15–3 2nd NCAA Sweet Sixteen 13 15
1988–89 Linda Sharp 12–16 8–10 T-4th
Linda Sharp: 271–99 116–40
Marianne Stanley (Pac-10) (1989–1993)
1989–90 Marianne Stanley 8–19 6–12 7th
1990–91 Marianne Stanley 18–12 11–7 3rd NCAA Second Round (Play-In)
1991–92 Marianne Stanley 23–8 14–4 2nd NCAA Elite Eight 12 23
1992–93 Marianne Stanley 22–7 14–4 2nd NCAA Sweet Sixteen 14 15
Marianne Stanley: 71–46 45–27
Cheryl Miller (Pac-10) (1993–1995)
1993–94 Cheryl Miller 26–4 16–2 1st NCAA Elite Eight 9 7
1994–95 Cheryl Miller 18–10 10–8 5th NCAA First Round
Cheryl Miller: 44–14 26–10
Fred Williams (Pac-10) (1995–1997)
1995–96 Fred Williams 13–14 8–10 T-6th
1996–97 Fred Williams 20–9 13–5 3rd NCAA Second Round
Fred Williams: 33–23 21–15
Chris Gobrecht (Pac-10) (1997–2004)
1997–98 Chris Gobrecht 12–15 7–11 6th
1998–99 Chris Gobrecht 7–20 3–15 T-9th
1999–2000 Chris Gobrecht 16–14 10–8 T-5th WNIT Sixteen
2000–01 Chris Gobrecht 13–15 8–10 T-6th
2001–02 Chris Gobrecht 16–14 11–7 T-4th WNIT Sixteen
2002–03 Chris Gobrecht 14–17 8–10 T-5th
2003–04 Chris Gobrecht 15–13 11–7 T-3rd
Chris Gobrecht: 93–108 58–68
Mark Trakh (Pac-10) (2004–2009)
2004–05 Mark Trakh 20–11 12–6 T-2nd NCAA Second Round 22
2005–06 Mark Trakh 19–12 11–7 4th NCAA Second Round
2006–07 Mark Trakh 17–13 10–8 5th
2007–08 Mark Trakh 17–13 10–8 4th
2008–09 Mark Trakh 17–15 9–9 T-4th
Mark Trakh: 90–64 52–38
Michael Cooper (Pac-10, Pac-12) (2009–2013)
2009–10 Michael Cooper 19–12 12–6 3rd
2010–11 Michael Cooper 24–13 10–8 4th WNIT Runner-up
2011–12 Michael Cooper 18–12 12–6 3rd
2012–13 Michael Cooper 11–20 7–11 7th
Michael Cooper: 72–57 41–31
Cynthia Cooper-Dyke (Pac-12) (2013–2017)
2013–14 Cynthia Cooper-Dyke 22–13 11–7 T–4th NCAA First Round
2014–15 Cynthia Cooper-Dyke 15–15 7–11 T–7th
2015–16 Cynthia Cooper-Dyke 19–13 6–12 8th
2016–17 Cynthia Cooper-Dyke 14–16 5–13 9th
Cynthia Cooper-Dyke: 56–41 24–30
Mark Trakh (Pac-12) (2017–present)
2017–18 Mark Trah 19–10 9–9 7th
Mark Trakh: 109-74 61-47
Total: 760–481

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

References[edit]

  1. ^ "USC Athletic Identity" (PDF). April 15, 2016. Retrieved June 11, 2017.
  2. ^ http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/usc/sports/w-baskbl/auto_pdf/2011-12/misc_non_event/2011-12WBBpp69-100.pdf (2012). "Women of Troy History,"
  3. ^ a b c "Women of Troy In the Pros". University of Southern California. Retrieved 2013-04-25.
  4. ^ "Cynthia Cooper Returns to Comets". WNBA.com. Retrieved 2013-04-25.
  5. ^ a b "Cynthia Cooper-Dyke Bio". CBSi Advanced Media. Retrieved 23 June 2016.
  6. ^ "Lisa Leslie.biography". A+E Television Networks, LLC. Retrieved 21 April 2013.
  7. ^ "Lisa Leslie Biography – Facts, Birthday, Life Story". Biography.com. 1972-07-07. Retrieved 2013-04-25.
  8. ^ "Tina Thompson". ©2013 Goodwin Sports Management, Inc. Retrieved 21 April 2013.
  9. ^ "SPARKS: Sparks Sign Olympian & WNBA Veteran Tina Thompson". Wnba.com. 2008-06-05. Retrieved 2013-04-25.
  10. ^ a b "Cheryl Miller". NBA Hoopedia. Retrieved 21 April 2013.
  11. ^ "Cheryl Miller Resigns as USC Coach". Los Angeles Times. 1995-09-16. Retrieved 2013-04-25.
  12. ^ "USC Trojans". NBA Hoopedia. Retrieved 20 April 2013.
  13. ^ "Trakh returns to USC". Swish Appeal. 2017-04-21. Retrieved 2017-04-21.
  14. ^ "Michael Cooper". CBS Interactive. Retrieved 20 April 2013.
  15. ^ "Cooper-Dyke resigns as USC basketball coach". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2017-03-07.
  16. ^ "Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena". NBA Hoopedia. Retrieved 29 April 2013.
  17. ^ "Galen Center". NBA Hoopedia. Retrieved 29 April 2013.
  18. ^ "Media Guide". USC. Retrieved 11 Aug 2013.

External links[edit]

Official Twitter: https://twitter.com/USCWBB

Fan Forum: http://uschoops.com/The-Other-Side-of-the-Trakh-forum/

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