John Lewis-class replenishment oiler

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USNS John Lewis (T-AO-205) underway at sea, in 2022 (220728-N-N2201-001).JPG
USNS John Lewis (T-AO-205) in 2022
Class overview
NameJohn Lewis class
BuildersGeneral Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO)
Preceded by Henry J. Kaiser class
Planned20
On order4
Building2
Completed2
Active2
General characteristics
TypeFleet replenishment oiler
Displacement49,850 tons full load
Length746 ft (227.4 m)
Beam106 ft 5 in (32.4 m)
Draft33.5 ft (10.2 m) maximum
PropulsionTwo medium-speed Fairbanks-Morse MAN 12V48/60CR diesel engines, two shafts, propellers
Speed20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph)
Endurance6,147 nmi (11,384 km; 7,074 mi)
Complement125 total
Electronic warfare
& decoys
AN/SLQ-25A Nixie torpedo countermeasures
Armament
Aviation facilitiesHelicopter flight deck
Notes
  • 5 refueling stations
  • 2 dry cargo transfer rigs

The John Lewis class is a class of fleet replenishment oilers which began construction in September 2018.[1] The class will comprise twenty oilers which will be operated by Military Sealift Command to provide underway replenishment of fuel and limited amounts of dry cargo to United States Navy carrier strike groups, amphibious ready groups, and other surface forces to allow them to operate worldwide.[2]

Design[edit]

The John Lewis-class ships are double-hulled and constructed to commercial standards and OPNAVINST 9070.1 requirements. They classed to American Bureau of Shipping steel vessel rules.[3] The ships have capabilities similar to the Henry J. Kaiser-class replenishment oilers and rely on existing technology.[4] The ships can carry 156,000 barrels of oil and have increased dry cargo storage over the Henry J. Kaiser class.[5] There are stations on both sides of each ship for underway replenishment of fuel and stores, and will have two dry cargo transfer rigs. The John Lewis-class ships have limited means of self-defense when delivered, including defenses against mines and torpedoes, and will be equipped with crew-served weapons which will be operated by embarked Navy Expeditionary Security Teams for limited self-defense ability against small boat attack. The ships have space, weight, and power reserved for additional self-defense systems, including close-in weapon systems (CIWS) or SeaRAM, and an anti-torpedo torpedo defense system. Even with additional self-defense systems installed the ships will still require escort if operating in a higher threat environment.[4]

History[edit]

On 30 June 2016, General Dynamics National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO) was awarded detailed design and construction for six John Lewis-class replenishment oilers.[6] NASSCO began construction on John Lewis on 20 September 2018, and began construction on Harvey Milk on 3 September 2020.[7] In January 2020 it was announced the lead ship delivery estimate had been delayed from November 2020 until June 2021 due to delays in delivery of gear and flooding of a graving dock.[4]

Naming[edit]

The class is named for its lead ship, John Lewis, which in turn is named for American politician and civil rights leader John Lewis. The remaining John Lewis-class oilers will be named after prominent civil rights leaders and activists.[4]

Ships[edit]

Ship Hull. No. Namesake Status Refs
John Lewis T-AO-205 John Lewis - Congressman Active [6] [8]
Harvey Milk T-AO-206 Harvey Milk - City Supervisor Christened 6 November 2021 [9]
Earl Warren T-AO-207 Earl Warren - Supreme Court Chief Justice Under construction [10]
Robert F. Kennedy T-AO-208 Robert F. Kennedy - Attorney General Under construction [11]
Lucy Stone T-AO-209 Lucy Stone - Woman's rights advocate On order [12]
Sojourner Truth T-AO-210 Sojourner Truth - Woman's rights advocate On order [12]
Thurgood Marshall T-AO-211 Thurgood Marshall - Supreme Court Justice On order [13]
Ruth Bader Ginsburg T-AO-212 Ruth Bader Ginsburg - Supreme Court Justice On order [14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fleet Replenishment Oilers T-AO". www.navy.mil. Retrieved 21 September 2020.
  2. ^ "Report to Congress on Requirements for the Fleet Replenishment Oiler, T-AO(X)" (PDF). Retrieved 21 September 2020.
  3. ^ Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) T-AO 205 John Lewis Class Fleet Replenishment Oiler (T-AO 205 Class). Department of Defense. p. 14.
  4. ^ a b c d "Navy John Lewis (TAO-205) Class Oiler Shipbuilding Program: Background and Issues for Congress" (PDF). fas.org. Retrieved 21 September 2020.
  5. ^ "John Lewis-Class (TAO-205) Replenishment Oiler Ships". naval-technology.com. Retrieved 21 September 2020.
  6. ^ a b "General Dynamics NASSCO Awarded Contract to Build Next Generation of U.S. Navy Fleet Oilers". nassco.com. 30 June 2016. Retrieved 21 September 2020.
  7. ^ "General Dynamics NASSCO Begins Construction on First Ship in the T-AO Fleet Oiler Program for U.S. Navy". nassco.com. 20 September 2018. Retrieved 21 September 2020.
  8. ^ "Navy Accepts Delivery of USNS John Lewis (T-AO 205)". Retrieved 31 July 2022.
  9. ^ "John Lewis-class replenishment oiler USNS Harvey Milk christened". naval-technology.com. 8 November 2021. Retrieved 1 April 2022.
  10. ^ "Fairbanks Morse ships diesel engines for future USNS Earl Warren". navaltoday.com. 16 June 2021. Retrieved 1 April 2022.
  11. ^ "GD-NASSCO begins construction of USNS Robert F. Kennedy". navalpost.com. 21 May 2021. Retrieved 1 April 2022.
  12. ^ a b "USNS John Lewis Conducts Builder's Trials". navalnews.com. 9 February 2022. Retrieved 1 April 2022.
  13. ^ "SECNAV Names Future T-AO USNS Thurgood Marshall, Sponsors for USS Doris Miller". seapowermagazine.org. 25 February 2022. Retrieved 28 February 2022.
  14. ^ "Navy to name ship after Ginsburg". thehill.com. 1 April 2022. Retrieved 1 April 2022.