USRA Heavy Mikado

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USRA Heavy Mikado
USRA Heavy Mikado.jpg
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Builder ALCO, Baldwin, Lima
Build date 1918–?
Total produced 233 originals, plus 724 copies[1]
Specifications
Configuration:
 • Whyte 2-8-2
 • UIC 1′D1′ h2
Driver dia. 63 in (1,600 mm)[2]
Wheelbase locomotive: 36 ft 1 in (11.00 m)[2]
Firebox:
 • Firegrate area
70.8 sq ft (6.58 m2)[2]
Boiler pressure 190 lbf/in2 (1,300 kPa)[2]
Cylinders Two[2]
Cylinder size 27 in × 32 in (690 mm × 810 mm)[2]
Valve gear Walschaerts[2]
Performance figures
Tractive effort 60,000 lbf (270 kN)[2]
General arrangement drawing.

The USRA Heavy Mikado was a USRA standard class of steam locomotive designed under the control of the United States Railroad Administration (USRA), the nationalized railroad system in the United States during World War I. These locomotives were of 2-8-2 wheel arrangement in the Whyte notation, or 1′D1′ in UIC classification. A total of 233 locomotives were built to this plan for the USRA; postwar, it became a de facto standard design, which was built to the total of 957 locomotives including the USRA originals and all subsequent copies.[2]

Heavy Mikado used the same running gear as the USRA Light Mikado but were built to a higher axle load, larger cylinders and a much larger boiler for more power and steam-generating ability. Many aspects of the PRR L1s class were carried over to the Heavy Mikado, although not that locomotive's distinctive Belpaire firebox.[1]

Original owners[edit]

USRA originals[edit]

Table of original USRA allocation[3]
Railroad Quantity Class Road numbers Notes
Central Railroad of New Jersey
10
M1s
850–859
reclassified M63 in 1945[4]
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad
15
O-4
5500–5514
Several to Colorado and Southern Railway and Fort Worth and Denver Railroad[5]
CB&Q affiliate Fort Worth and Denver Railway
5
E-4A2
451–455
[6]
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (“Milwaukee Road”)
100
L3
8600–8699
Renumbered 300–399 (not in order)[7]
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railway (“Omaha Road”)
4
J-2
422–425
[8]
El Paso and Southwestern Railroad
5
to Great Northern Railway #3204–3208 in 1920[9]
Elgin, Joliet and Eastern Railway
5
to Western Pacific Railroad in 1920[10]
Erie Railroad
15
N-2
3200–3214
[11]
Great Northern Railway
4
O-3
3145–3148
[9]
Louisville and Nashville Railroad
20
J4
1750–1769
[12]
New York Central Railroad subsidiary Pittsburgh and Lake Erie Railroad
15
H-9b, H-9d
9505–9509, 9510–9519
[13]
New York Central Railroad subsidiary Pittsburgh, McKeesport and Youghiogheny Railroad
15
H-9a, H-9c
9580–9589, 9590–9594
[13]
Wheeling and Lake Erie Railway
20
M-1
6001–6020
to New York, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad (“Nickel Plate Road”) #671–690 in 1949[14]
Total 233

Copies[1][edit]

Table of copies
Railroad Quantity Class Road numbers Notes
Central Railroad of New Jersey
56
M2s, M2as, M3
860–915
reclassified M63 in 1945[4]
Chicago, Indianapolis and Louisville Railroad (“Monon”) [citation needed]
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railway (“Omaha Road”)
6
J-2
426–431
[8]
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railway (“Omaha Road”)
8
J-3
432–439
[8]
Louisville and Nashville Railroad
145
J-4, J-4A
1770–1914
[12]
Missouri Pacific Railroad
170
MK-63
1401–1570
[15]
MP subsidiary St. Louis, Brownsville and Mexico Railway
10
MK-63
1111–1120
[15]
New York, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad (“Nickel Plate Road”) [citation needed]
Pittsburgh and West Virginia Railway
St. Louis-San Francisco Railway
65
4100
4100–4164
[16]
Southern Railway
115
Ms-4
4800–4915
[17]
Southern subsidiary Alabama Great Southern Railroad
8
Ms-4
6622–9929
[17]
Southern subsidiary Cincinnati, New Orleans and Texas Pacific Railroad
43
Ms-4
6320–6337, 6350–6374
[17]
West Point Route (Atlanta and West Point Rail Road)
1
F
430
[18]
West Point Route (Western Railway of Alabama)
1
F
380
[18]
Total 724

None of the originals built under USRA auspices or any of the subsequent copies were preserved.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Westcott (1960).
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Huddleston (2002).
  3. ^ "USRA locomotives". Steamlocomotive.com. Retrieved 2009-02-22. 
  4. ^ a b Drury pp.74, 76
  5. ^ Drury pp.101, 106
  6. ^ Drury pp.136, 138
  7. ^ Drury pp.116, 122
  8. ^ a b c Drury pp. 95, 98
  9. ^ a b Keyes & Middleton p.102
  10. ^ Drury p.430
  11. ^ Drury pp.172, 180
  12. ^ a b Drury pp.277, 230
  13. ^ a b Drury pp. 268, 278
  14. ^ Drury p.287
  15. ^ a b Drury pp.248–249, 254
  16. ^ Drury pp.342, 345
  17. ^ a b c Drury pp.369, 372–373
  18. ^ a b Drury p.30
  • Drury, George H. (1983), Guide to North American Steam Locomotives, Waukesha, Wisconsin: Kalmbach Publishing Company, ISBN 0-89024-206-2, LCCN 93041472 
  • Huddleston, Eugene L. (2002). Uncle Sam's Locomotives: The USRA and the Nation's Railroads. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press. ISBN 0-253-34086-1. 
  • Keyes, Norman C, Jr; Middleton, Kenneth R (Autumn 1980). "The Great Northern Railway Company: All-Time Locomotive Roster 1861–1970". Railroad History. Boston, MA: The Railway and Locomotive Historical Society, Inc. (143). ISSN 0090-7847. 
  • Westcott, Linn H. (1960). Model Railroader Cyclopedia, Volume 1: Steam Locomotives. Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Kalmbach Publishing Co. ISBN 0-89024-001-9. 
  • "Clearance and Weight Diagrams for Standard Locomotives". Railway Age. 65 (17): pp. 745–746. October 25, 1918 – via Archive.org. open access publication – free to read